South Africa gone down the Zimbabwe route.

And what lessons will have been learned, children?







...Absolutely fuck all.

Stand by for a repeat a few years down the line once the farms are looking good and making a profit again. SA will pay no attention whatsoever and continue with land grabs then wonder why it all went wahoonie shaped.
Never mind mate, at least you'll still have your biltong :twisted:
 
It'll be worth more than gold when you sugar addicted teletubbies realise you don't know how to make it and the shortage starts raising prices on the open market.
 
It'll be worth more than gold when you sugar addicted teletubbies realise you don't know how to make it and the shortage starts raising prices on the open market.
Now, now! As I said before only the commercial dried meat has sugar in it, the same as your commercially made biltong. Looking at the way biltong is made and the way we make our dried meats, there isn't a whole lot of difference. Our stuff is air dried as well.
 
Our commercially made stuff has very little sugar, unlike the syrup enhanced disasters in US convenience stores.
 
Our commercially made stuff has very little sugar, unlike the syrup enhanced disasters in US convenience stores.
Your commercially made stuff has quite a fair bit of sugar in it to appeal to the folks that don't know how to make it or might be trying it for the first time so spare me the BS. It isn't any better or any healthier than the commercially made $hite they make here.

I wouldn't give either to any of my dogs let alone eat it myself.
 
Yup, no idea what other crap is in there either to ensure it doesn't go rancid sweating in a plastic baggie on the shelf in the shop. Lasts forever in the open air but any moisture can make it a bit manky if kept in a bag or in the fridge.
 
And what lessons will have been learned, children?







...Absolutely fuck all.

Stand by for a repeat a few years down the line once the farms are looking good and making a profit again. SA will pay no attention whatsoever and continue with land grabs then wonder why it all went wahoonie shaped.
Hasn't all the infrastructure gone that supported the farms. All the light industries in Bulawyo that made tractors and other farm equipment, fertilisers etc. Plus the banks that loaned the money for the purchase of these and the payment of farm staff.

Would they ever be profitable again? Like you say, why work your nuts off trying to get them running again when there is the chance they could be seized again.

Isn't it the reason that a lot of western firms are reluctant to invest in Africa?
 
Pretty much. The understanding of how things work doesn't extend that far though. Screaming about lack of investment and jobs in the same breath as threatening to sieze assets, then wondering why no one is throwing money at them.

Take that a step further and it explains how maintenance budgets get turned into luxury vehicles and personal bank accounts while infrastructure goes down the shitter.
 
Yup, no idea what other crap is in there either to ensure it doesn't go rancid sweating in a plastic baggie on the shelf in the shop. Lasts forever in the open air but any moisture can make it a bit manky if kept in a bag or in the fridge.
I make a load of it up after a hunt and after which I put it in bags and vacuum seal the bags, doing this the stuff will keep for ages in the freezer. I pulled out some stuff over a year old from the freezer a few weeks back when I went ice fishing, it was still good and both the dogs and I enjoyed it.
 
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Freezer is fine (although it can affect flavour), but unless it's kept in the open, room temp or fridge temps will eventually cause a bit of deterioration if there's moisture present in the bag. One of the reasons the commercial stuff is hardly worth the effort.
 
Freezer is fine (although it can affect flavour), but unless it's kept in the open, room temp or fridge temps will eventually cause a bit of deterioration if there's moisture present in the bag. One of the reasons the commercial stuff is hardly worth the effort.
I found that if the bag is vacuum sealed it keeps it's flavour just fine in the freezer. That stuff I pulled out a few weeks back was from December 2018, seriously mate, it was just as good as the day I made it and tasted it back then.
 
OK, not tried vacuum sealing. Might give that a go with some sliced wet 'tong I have.

Ostrich is usually a very dry biltong and snaps when you bend it. Great salty snack with beer. I find the very dry stuff particularly good if pounded with a hammer to make a coarse powder and served on toast with a dab of Marmite or Bovril.



These particular bites seem to be cubes of toast with cream cheese rolled in biltong powder. Something your missus should be making as it's a bit fussy. Easier to just dust a slice of toast and Bovril with a handful of biltong powder.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Looks like after 20 years Zimbabwe might have learned something.




It's only a start, but will hopefully be the first of many on the journey from being the bread basket of Africa to basketcase of Africa and back to bread basket of Africa.
They sold stolen farms before, only to steal them again once, as Lardy says, they were up and running.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
I found that if the bag is vacuum sealed it keeps it's flavour just fine in the freezer. That stuff I pulled out a few weeks back was from December 2018, seriously mate, it was just as good as the day I made it and tasted it back then.
That might not be saying much about your biltong.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Your commercially made stuff has quite a fair bit of sugar in it to appeal to the folks that don't know how to make it or might be trying it for the first time so spare me the BS.
Really ?
I've bought commercial tong in pubs and bars and can't say I've noticed.
Which makes are full of sugar ?
 
Really ?
I've bought commercial tong in pubs and bars and can't say I've noticed.
Which makes are full of sugar ?
Yeah really!
Can't remember or be bothered to look for the link again. I found a South African website for commercially made biltong and posted the list of ingredients up on another thread for Lardbeast to have a look at. One of the ingredients listed was sugar.

I didn't say it was full of sugar either, I said it had a fair bit of sugar in it.
 
That might not be saying much about your biltong.
How so? I also never said it was biltong I make. I make jerky in much the same way that biltong is made, that is aired dried. Lardbeast and I were having a bit of a p!sstake out of each other on another thread and now carrying it on some on here.
 
OK, not tried vacuum sealing. Might give that a go with some sliced wet 'tong I have.

Ostrich is usually a very dry biltong and snaps when you bend it. Great salty snack with beer. I find the very dry stuff particularly good if pounded with a hammer to make a coarse powder and served on toast with a dab of Marmite or Bovril.



These particular bites seem to be cubes of toast with cream cheese rolled in biltong powder. Something your missus should be making as it's a bit fussy. Easier to just dust a slice of toast and Bovril with a handful of biltong powder.
Hmmm interesting, never thought to do it or try that way with my jerky and I might give that a try. Herself doesn't deal with the meat products, the sausages, bacon and all other meat products are down to me. Haven't seen any ostrich around here so far but I'll keep my eyes open, hey it wouldn't surprise me to stumble upon one up here as we get all sorts around these parts.

She does all the canning of potatoes, veg and fruits and other types of foodstuffs we produce ourselves. We have a lot of wild apple trees and pear trees around here so there is always plenty for her to can. There are also loads of wild strawberry, gooseberries and raspberry patches that we share with the mountain critters.
 
It's paradise, your name is Adam and you walk around all day with your danglies swinging free in the breeze, you dorrty bugger.
 

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