South Africa gone down the Zimbabwe route.

I have also used an airing cupboard.

The flies!!! I learned in Kenya to have a mossie net bag round my strips as they dried after finding maggots on a batch that had been taken to school by my cousins with whom I was living, and hadn’t been quite so fussy. I had the last laugh on that one.

When I first arrived in Saudi in 75 the flies were huge and in thick clouds. Then the Saudis signed a contract with Ciba-Giegy for ariel pest control spraying. It was terminated when some citizens fell over along with the flies. When it was over there were no insects...or birds for some years after.
 
Make it yourself, its pretty simple. Then you can control the taste spiciness and dryness. Cheaper and customisable.

My grandmother taught me when I was a boy, and we always took in back to school with us. I sent it to my lads when they were in school, and now my grand-daughters are always asking for it, as neither of my lads seem inclined, and have always liked Dad’s, lazy gits. It is a bit of a ‘Marmite’ thing, neither of my daughters-in-law liked it nor did my wife.

I have used this, and do have it in the cupboard but generally now simply use Black Pepper, Coriander, Garlic salt, and Chili powder.
.

I use Silverside with no fat at all. My marinade is mainly Malt Vineger, some Balsamic, some Soy Sauce, Tobasco and, L&P's Worcestershire sauce. Make that to taste, then marinade your meat strips in that in a zip lock plastic bag in the fridge for at least 12 hours.

Pat dry with paper towels then season with your spices then dry. I do have a desicator but a Biltong drying box is a very simple build, Youtube is your friend. In Kenya and Saudi I air-dried in the sun.
I really can't make anything. I am not joking - useless at cooking, apart from a very few specific dishes.
 
An airconditioner does it without dust or flies, but they add taste.

Mmmcrunchy...

Winter on the Highveld is the best time to make 'tong. Cold enough to fook off the flies and extremely dry. Keep a fan on the 'tong in the garage for a day or two and it's good to go within three days.

Back when one was a kid everyone made their own biltong in the garage. Point of pride to make it better than the neighbours and you'd often go home after visiting friends and family with a few sticks as padkos. Teething babies were given a chunk to ease the eruption of new fangs and you learned at a young age to appreciate nyama and regard chicken as a vegetable.

ETA: Legend has it umfaan @Cutaway was teethed on biltong to prevent him killing and eating the neighbours' kids.
 
Last edited:
Can't remember its name but there's a Saffer shop in the arches below Charing Cross Station (near the "Herman Ze German" Brattie shop, and opposite end to the "Ship & Shovell" pub ) which sells passable biltong (to my undiscerning palate)
 
Can't remember its name but there's a Saffer shop in the arches below Charing Cross Station (near the "Herman Ze German" Brattie shop, and opposite end to the "Ship & Shovell" pub ) which sells passable biltong (to my undiscerning palate)
That's a branch of Savannah. They produce good nyama*, there's no doubt, but their quality control seems to be less rigorous than Selfridges. If you're making it yourself, I've found the 'skirt' cut to be the most convenient in size and taste. Get the butcher to take off the fat overcoat and Bob's your uncle.

* Bloody Saffers nicking good KiSwahili maneno.
 
That's a branch of Savannah. They produce good nyama*, there's no doubt, but their quality control seems to be less rigorous than Selfridges. If you're making it yourself, I've found the 'skirt' cut to be the most convenient in size and taste. Get the butcher to take off the fat overcoat and Bob's your uncle.

* Bloody Saffers nicking good KiSwahili maneno.
That's far too technical for me I'm afraid, I just bought some tasty Biltong from there when falling out of the aforementioned pub (which at least saved me from taking out a mortgage for a brattie in Herman Ze German - the most expensive post pub food I've come across in London).

As for cows wearing skirts, is that some kinky Boer thing?
 
Can't remember its name but there's a Saffer shop in the arches below Charing Cross Station (near the "Herman Ze German" Brattie shop, and opposite end to the "Ship & Shovell" pub ) which sells passable biltong (to my undiscerning palate)
I do like Herman Ze German place....have been there a few times after a few drinks around the area. It is a bit expensive as someone mentioned. But after a few drinks and when you have a few quid in the bank you don't really care.
 
...Bloody Saffers nicking good KiSwahili maneno.
kiSwahili? You mean the bastardised slavers' lingua franca for East Africa? The one that uses quite a few Nguni words along with Arabic and other central African languages?

Such as nyama?

That one...?

Couldn't resist. Sorry...
 
Re kiSwahili, it amuses me how trendy minority students in the US see it as a language of their forebears and claim cultural links to the slavers' tongue without realising the reality.

Notwithstanding that most in the US were shipped from the west coast, east coast slavers supplying the middle east and Indian Ocean markets (and still do to some extent).

Does that count as cultural appropriation?
 
If you google biltong in UK there are loads all over the place, this one in Amersham looks good The Biltong Shop
I'd buy regularly from Savannah, but it costs £16 or so to send a £20 packet to NI, so I make myself with a dehumidifier and little fan in the spare room.

However, I've just checked your link there, and they only charge £2.66 for postage, so I've ordered some. Ta.
 
...incidentally, at one time I used to fairly regularly travel between Beitbridge and Joburg to do battle with suppliers, and a little butchery and biltong shop on the Southern side of Louis Trichardt sold as good as it's possible to get; run by a little old Afrikaner lady whose recipe she wouldn't share, the bag.
 
Back to kiSwahili: We were in Mozambique on holiday when I were a nipper, ie. pre-'74. The old man had worked in East Africa (Tsetse control / Maumau stuff) and had learned some Swahili. He was talking to the local shop keeper one day when a black guy wandered in. Black dude couldn't speak English or Porra, the Porra's English was rudimentary, so the old man ran translation between the two.
 
Back to kiSwahili: We were in Mozambique on holiday when I were a nipper, ie. pre-'74. The old man had worked in East Africa (Tsetse control / Maumau stuff) and had learned some Swahili. He was talking to the local shop keeper one day when a black guy wandered in. Black dude couldn't speak English or Porra, the Porra's English was rudimentary, so the old man ran translation between the two.
Probably wandered down from what is now Tanzania. kiSwahili not really used much in Moz except in border areas in the far north. Found the same in Uganda and Burundi when trying to converse with folks there despite claims it's widespread.
 
Probably wandered down from what is now Tanzania. kiSwahili not really used much in Moz except in border areas in the far north. Found the same in Uganda and Burundi when trying to converse with folks there despite claims it's widespread.
True. A few years ago now, at Rebkona in S Sudan there was a cook in the Petronas oily compound who was hugely delighted when I greeted him with a Jambo; he'd been lonely fit to cut his wrists because nobody spoke his lingo there. The local Dinka and Leik treated him like poo. Came from a village I knew, too, near Arusha. My steaks were never so beautifully grilled, and apparently (the British/Indian surveyor on the spot told me later) he stopped fighting while he had someone to have a beer with.
 
Re kiSwahili, it amuses me how trendy minority students in the US see it as a language of their forebears and claim cultural links to the slavers' tongue without realising the reality.

Notwithstanding that most in the US were shipped from the west coast, east coast slavers supplying the middle east and Indian Ocean markets (and still do to some extent).

Does that count as cultural appropriation?
Hey, hakuna matata, man. This phrase, it should be noted, was the source of much belly-laughter in East Africa when tourists started using it there to show some sort of brotherly solidarity. Not in earshot of the tourists, of course, who would receive it back at them (and a High-Five) using the Bronx accent it was delivered with in the popular film. It's appalling pidgin-kiswahili, probably picked up by a film-company researcher on a visit prior to briefing the cartoon director back in LA. Matatiso hamna (no *little* problem) would have been less grotesque. Mind you, a quick search of 'Kwanzaa' and all of the bullshit around it is just pathetic. Next time anyone is accused of cultural appropriation this should be used as a response. All good fun, though.
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top