Soundproofing a room.

#1
Evening all. Leaving a terraced house into a semi .Looking to do some kind of soundproofing to son's room. He has autism and his meltdowns sometimes get loud ,so don't want to disturb nextdoor . Both ways really as I don't want to hear Corrie,Ender's, coming from them.
Anyone done this? tips? Rockwool?
Thanks in advance.
 
#3
Evening all. Leaving a terraced house into a semi .Looking to do some kind of soundproofing to son's room. He has autism and his meltdowns sometimes get loud ,so don't want to disturb nextdoor . Both ways really as I don't want to hear Corrie,Ender's, coming from them.
Anyone done this? tips? Rockwool?
Thanks in advance.
Hard. Airborne noise is a bugger. Can you move him to bedroom furthest away or are they all adjacent walls?
 
#4
Soundproofing for engine compartments is either egg box foam which is cheap or composite sheets of foam and thin lead, which is not cheap.
 
#5
Would it not benefit both households by using the egg-box foam in your home and ask the neighbour if you can have it done in his too? :cool:
 

greyfergie

MIA
Book Reviewer
#7
Genuine answer its very hard. You can use acoustic plasterboard which will help. But you'll still have adjoining floor cavity 'gaps', attic 'gaps' etc

If it were me - 25mm Kingspan insulation dot and dabbed to the existing plaster, 12.5 acoustic plasterboard dot and dabbed to that and then get a plasterer in to reskim the wall...
 
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#8
Evening all. Leaving a terraced house into a semi .Looking to do some kind of soundproofing to son's room. He has autism and his meltdowns sometimes get loud ,so don't want to disturb nextdoor . Both ways really as I don't want to hear Corrie,Ender's, coming from them.
Anyone done this? tips? Rockwool?
Thanks in advance.
Do the loft. We’ve had some noise problems from next door. Whilst up the loft, I noticed no wall in the loft between the two properties.

Sorted that and it has improved, plus boarded the loft so sound going up into it limits.
 
#9
As per above, it's not easy to retro fit.
One thing that will transfer noises a lot are fixings into the walls.
Dot and dabbing mentioned above will be quieter than solid nails/screws.

Either way, best of luck for you/him dealing with the meltdowns :)
 
#11
Can't really be done by retrofit without spending a fortune.
Someone I know spent the best part of eight grand soundproofing her ceilings, specialist company came in and although it was a vast improvement, still lots of audible annoyance to both parties.
The company did say that there were no guarantees.
I have been in lots of recording studios/rehearsal rooms over the years and some of the rooms are triple skinned with three doors, all with triple glazing. Sound still escapes but its mostly low frequency so a screaming kid would be quieter.
I think the phrase "sound proof" is a misnomer.
 
#13
Some ideas on this site How to Soundproof a Room for Music Recording however, as a semi-professional composer who has built a studio into a bedroom, do not expect it to be cheap and expect to lose at least 10 cm of floor space where the properties join. The key is a combination of mass and an air gap between two heavy/dense materials. Egg boxes or egg-box foam will dampen down reverb (echo) in a room but will not do much for sound transmission except for high pitched sounds.
 
#14
Thanks for advice. I know it won't stop all sound but if I can say maybe reduce the high pitched levels at the least. The loft will be getting borderd out, so will look at putting something there as well.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#16
make sure the floor covering is carpet rather than laminate, you can get thick foam underlay, if you use 2 layers under the carpet that helps to stop noisy feet
also ensure all the floorboards are screwed down tightly
I have studded a room out and packed ti with rockwool, then boarded it and taped and skimmed the joints that works
also make sure you use decorators caulk between the wall and ceiling, as even small crack let noise through
skirting boards likewise, caulk them at the top to the plasterboard , try to ensure all furnishings have soft surfaces to prevent reflection of sound, and use caulk in the gap above the ceiling rose, as the cable entry is normally large enough to let noise through, if down-lighters are fitted, replace them with LED units with intumescent seals, as lagging the ceiling void will cause Tungsten lamps to overheat
 
#17
Acoustic bars (a type of Z-angle), acoustic boards, plywood, carpet, acoustic sealant, dense insulation - lots of specialist stuff and lots of cash. You'll lose about 12" in length and width in every room as well as 6-7" in height. You'll be taking floorboards up and fitting suspended ceilings as you try to isolate everything from everything else. And you'd be doing every room in your quest to stop sound transferring.

And it may not make a difference - especially in the summer when your and your neighbour's windows are open.

If the house is traditional brick/block construction, it's probably reasonably sound-resistant anyway. Just don't bang on the party wall and put your son in a bedroom that's furthest away from it. Thick carpets and underlay are about as good as it gets.
 
#18
Some sound advice (sorry) above. Agree that insulating the floor is a good plan and that ceiling insulation can help.
I had some info on soundproofing party walls at some point. If I recall correctly, it was recommended to erect a partition using high density sound absorbing boards mounted to battens, so as to create an air gap of about 1.5". Wool is sometimes used for acoustic damping, so you could fit wool cushioning on top of the board. All this will reduce the length of the room a bit.

Clothing and bedding absorb noise. You could have some shelving or cupboards on the room side of the sound proofing.

I don't have the info to hand but these folk might be helpful:

Building / DIY Supplies Archives - GIK Acoustics Europe
 
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#19
Soundproofing for engine compartments is either egg box foam which is cheap or composite sheets of foam and thin lead, which is not cheap.
having done a large truck engine compartment and cab I concur, fecking expensive
 
#20
If you really want to go soundproof, bear in mind that this is achieved by making every surface very heavy - sound is transmitted by vibration, the weight damps it. You also need to fill every cavity with dense and soft materials to prevent air transmitting from one surface to another (like the two skins of a drum). Each skin of the construction has to be flexibly joined (the acoustic bars - Z-angles - reduce the direct vibration by flexing a little bit).

I'm not making a good job of the description.
Probably best to Google "acoustic bar", "resilient bar" and "hush bar" (they're all the same sort of thing). The images will give you an idea and the prices will have you breaking out in a sweat.

Resilient Bar installation guide

Also worth remembering that it's not just the party wall that has to be soundproofed. It's everything that touches anything that touches any part of the party wall. That's pretty much every wall, floor and ceiling. Miss one and you may as well not bother.
 
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