SoS Def

#1
Announcement on Afghanistan on BBC Radio 5 Live now

London Evening Standard
4,000 UK troops could leave next year in speedier Afghan pull-out
David Cameron today announced a significant withdrawal of British troops from Afghanistan which could see 4,000 return home next year.

Downing Street said that progress by Afghan forces in taking charge of security was happening quicker than planned. The proposed pull-down would see troops return in roughly equal numbers in two stages, next year and in 2014.

The Prime Minister has pledged to end Britain’s combat role in Afghanistan by the end of 2014, with a small number of personnel remaining to train local troops. UK troops are already being cut from 9,500 to 9,000 before Christmas. Allied forces are expected to see their final summer “fighting season” next year, after which the British contingent could fall to around 5,000.

Mr Cameron has agreed with President Barack Obama that there are “further opportunities” for personnel to be brought home over the next 12 months. The two leaders covered the situation in an hour-long video call. Downing Street said: “They discussed progress on the plan to hand security responsibility from the International Security Assistance Force (Isaf) to the Afghan National Security Forces and agreed that the Nato strategy to withdraw combat troops from Afghanistan by the end of 2014 was on track.
4,000 UK troops could leave next year in speedier Afghan pull-out - UK - News - London Evening Standard
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#3
"will" - and if you don't think that planning for this has been going on for a loooong time, then you're even more naive than the media :)
 
P

PrinceAlbert

Guest
#5
"will" - and if you don't think that planning for this has been going on for a loooong time, then you're even more naive than the media :)
It says "could" in the report. I know the draw down plans, and the 4000 troops are extra curricular to the current plans. Hence the "could"

This is talking about 2013, not 2014.
 
#7
The question is should they be?

Are the Afghans ready? Especially training and logistically?

The last thing you want is to have to go back in 5/10 years.

Would it not be a good idea for high level/strategic enablers to remain? Eg NATO to remain responsible for parts of officer and NCO training, small teams in HQs to assist ops, planning and training?

Yes this is where the risk from blue (terry in blue) on blue is but it makes sure the job that was started is finished.




Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
 
P

PrinceAlbert

Guest
#8
Are the Afghans ready? Especially training and logistically?

The last thing you want is to have to go back in 5/10 years.
No they're not. There are certain places in Afg that the ANA/ANP will not patrol unless they have CF callsigns alongside them. They simply refuse to rock up. Until this is resolved then pulling out will mean that all our efforts have been for nothing.

It's the Russians turn again next time.....and 5/10 years is too long.
 
#9
No they're not. There are certain places in Afg that the ANA/ANP will not patrol unless they have CF callsigns alongside them. They simply refuse to rock up. Until this is resolved then pulling out will mean that all our efforts have been for nothing.

It's the Russians turn again next time.....and 5/10 years is too long.
Or India v Pakistan in a proxy war, with the Iranians stirring things up?
 
#10
No they're not. There are certain places in Afg that the ANA/ANP will not patrol unless they have CF callsigns alongside them. They simply refuse to rock up. Until this is resolved then pulling out will mean that all our efforts have been for nothing.

It's the Russians turn again next time.....and 5/10 years is too long.
Can it be resolved?
 
#11
The question is should they be?

Are the Afghans ready? Especially training and logistically?

The last thing you want is to have to go back in 5/10 years.

Would it not be a good idea for high level/strategic enablers to remain? Eg NATO to remain responsible for parts of officer and NCO training, small teams in HQs to assist ops, planning and training?

Yes this is where the risk from blue (terry in blue) on blue is but it makes sure the job that was started is finished.




Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
We all know the answer to there, apart from it seems the politicians.
 
#17
Well those classic COIN tactics worked in Iraq.

If you want to defend the people you have to be with them, not patrol into the area on a daily basis.

It is high risk but it has shown it works.


Posted from the ARRSE Mobile app (iOS or Android)
Did they? Is that why Iraq is on the verge of civil war then? Iraq is in shit state and was left in a worse state then it was when it was taken. Afghanistan has got better, but will be back to what it was in a matter of years. We haven't seen it work anywhere yet.
 
#18
The stated goal of the invasion of Afghanistan was the dismantling of the Al Queda terrorist organization and ending its use of Afghanistan as a base.

Has this goal been achieved or not?

Are the Taliban capable of undertaking a 9/11 style attack on US or British soil (external assitance from Pakistan notwithsatnding)? probably not - so what threat do they present to us exactly and why are we still there?

Mineral rights? - better hurry up, the Chinese are grabbing it all.
 

Latest Threads

New Posts