Something Up in Saudi ?

#1
Turki al-Faisal, the Saudi ambassador, has abruptly left Washington after only 15 months.There is speculation that maybe the Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal or the King may have died.
 
#2
If it kicks off in Saudi, where will b liar get his troops from, The Royal British Legion?
 
#5
Nothing on Reuters as yet.
 
#6
Could just be that the Saudis are waking up to the threat on their doorstep posed by a nooklear Iran. Turki is a wily old so-and-so, better off strutting his stuff in Tehran and Damascus than Georgetown.

The Saudis are getting more focussed on regional politics now that it appears that the septics and we poodles are going to destabilise the place yet further by pulling out.

As a complete aside, there's this from the BBC: "In December 2004, Prince Turki accepted substantial libel damages and an apology from the magazine Paris Match over claims he himself was linked to the 11 September attacks". Septic opinion on this difficult matter has never really been revised sufficiently to ease his entry into social high society.

Nobody is going to pass him the pyramid of Ferrero Rocher choccies.
 
#7
tomahawk6 said:
Turki al-Faisal, the Saudi ambassador, has abruptly left Washington after only 15 months.There is speculation that maybe the Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal or the King may have died.
What source was this from?
 
#8
tomahawk6 said:
There is speculation that maybe the Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal or the King may have died.
blimey it will be full on lock down if either of them has died, and probably not a good result for the world whoever takes over.
 
#10
First link:

POL-U.S.-SAUDI ARABIA
Prince Turki al-Faisal, Saudi ambassador to U.S., abruptly leaves post

WASHINGTON, Dec. 12 (KUNA) -- Prince Turki al-Faisal, the Saudi ambassador to the United States, flew out of Washington on Monday after informing Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice that he was leaving the job, the Washington Post reported on Tuesday.

The Post, citing Arab diplomatic sources, said Prince Turki told his staff on Monday afternoon that he wanted to spend more time with his family.
http://www.kuna.net.kw/Home/Story.aspx?Language=en&DSNO=933473
 
#11
What is the form if (unconnected with this case of course) a Diplomat is declared PNG?
 
#12
Letterwritingman said:
First link:

POL-U.S.-SAUDI ARABIA
Prince Turki al-Faisal, Saudi ambassador to U.S., abruptly leaves post

WASHINGTON, Dec. 12 (KUNA) -- Prince Turki al-Faisal, the Saudi ambassador to the United States, flew out of Washington on Monday after informing Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice that he was leaving the job, the Washington Post reported on Tuesday.

The Post, citing Arab diplomatic sources, said Prince Turki told his staff on Monday afternoon that he wanted to spend more time with his family.
I don't think this is a 'Tory More Time With Family Orange in Gob' excuse.

Watch out for a redefinition of Saudi's relationship with the bonkers bollox of Iran.

Turki's close relations 'in the past' with Al-Qaida should come in handy. We are looking at a major sea change in ME politics.


http://www.kuna.net.kw/Home/Story.aspx?Language=en&DSNO=933473
 
#13
Basically they're forced to leave the country which makes the declaration and are never permitted to return even in a civilian capacity.

If the declaration is made in conjunction with an accusation of activities incompatible with diplomatic status (i.e. espionage against the host nation), the diplomat's nation will "usually" retaliate by expelling a similar number of the host nation's diplomats, again usually those they know are intelligence agents rather than diplomats, in a tit for tat reaction.
 
#14
This from Globalsecurity.org about the last time that Turki made a sudden decision to resign, back in 2001 - and NO, I am not a tin foil hat wearer, so Frenchmong and SLRBoy can fcuk off in advance, but as I have hinted, Washington SIGINT may have uncovered some unpleasant elements in the good ambassador's contacts book.

"Other speculation focused on the fact that his departure came a few days before September 11th. One conjecture suggested that Turki had found out about the planned attacks and was trying to dissuade bin Laden. His failure to do so, or his failure to report his prior knowledge, could have precipitated his dismissal as intelligence chief.

A few days after 9-11, an aircraft carrying 31 Saudi nationals departed the United States. Some reports claim that among the passengers was Prince Turki bin Faisal. One of Prince Turki's brother was also said to be on board the flight.
"

If we were'nt flogging 'em billions of pounds worth of Typhoons, etc, we'd be taking a long, hard look at the Saudis and we'd be asking a lot more questions. Blessings and peace be upon you all, by the way.
 
#17
From the the Economist Intelligence Unit (13/12/06)

Reshuffle in Saudi Arabia

The outgoing ambassador to America might become foreign minister

The abrupt departure from Washington of Saudi Arabia's highly regarded ambassador, Prince Turki al-Faisal, has been described by close associates as being related to family concerns, and should not be taken as confirmation of rumours that he is to replace his ailing elder brother, Saud al-Faisal, as foreign minister. However, the elevation of Prince Turki to foreign minister, either as a simple replacement for his brother or as part of a wider reshuffle, would come as no surprise, given the recent signals coming out of Riyadh pointing to a desire to adopt a much more assertive regional foreign policy, in response to the looming defeat of the US in Iraq and the accompanying growth of Iranian power.

Saud al-Faisal has been in poor health for several years, and his public appearances have become increasingly infrequent. His lack of vigour has been compensated for to some extent by the high status afforded to the office of ambassador to Washington during the 22-year stint of Prince Bandar bin Sultan, who was accorded cabinet rank. Prince Bandar was recalled to Riyadh last year to take on the post of head of the National Security Council, focusing on regional affairs. Prince Turki was a more than adequate replacement, having distinguished himself in his previous post as ambassador to the UK. (Prince Turki had earlier served for 24 years as chief of Saudi intelligence until his replacement in August 2001—the proximity of this date to the 9/11 attacks and Prince Turki's former contacts with both Osama bin Laden and Taliban leaders in Afghanistan prompted speculation that his handling of the al-Qaida dossier had played a part in his removal from this post.)

Facing up to Iran

Saudi Arabia's growing alarm at the course of events in the Middle East was evident from the comments of King Abdullah bin Abdel-Aziz al-Saud at the recent summit of Gulf Arab leaders, when he referred to the region as a powder keg liable to be ignited at any time. An even more graphic account of the risks facing Saudi Arabia came in an opinion article in the Washington Post by Nawaf Obaid, a security consultant who has worked for the Saudi embassy. Mr Obaid suggested that Saudi Arabia could take a much more aggressive approach towards Iran's involvement in Iraq, including arming Sunni militias and using its oil power to lower crude prices and thereby damage the Iranian economy. The Saudi government disassociated itself from Mr Obaid's views, and Prince Turki said that the embassy had decided to terminate its contact with him so as to emphasise his independence from official Saudi policy.

It is conceivable that Prince Turki's departure from Washington may be linked to the Obaid article, with the ambassador possibly facing censure from Riyadh for being associated with a somewhat inflammatory position, at odds with Saudi Arabia's official policy of cultivating cordial relations with Iran. However, there is no question that Saudi Arabia is genuinely alarmed at the prospect of Shia supremacy in Iraq and of a Hizbullah takeover of power in Lebanon.

With Prince Bandar reserved for discreet missions behind the scenes and Prince Saud in no state to engage in gruelling rounds of public diplomacy, the kingdom has been unable to impose itself on the regional political scene with any real conviction. Prince Turki has the credentials to fill this gap, and would arguably be more of an asset for Saudi Arabia pressing its views in Baghdad, Beirut and Tehran than on television chat shows in Washington.
 
#18
My theory is that he's off back to take up his old job, but organising the shipment of spare jihad heads to the Sunni side of Iraq rather than the freedom loving people of Afghanistan. The Saudis' biggest exports after oil are jihadis, and rhetoric against them.
 
#19
Now if i were of the tin foil hat brigade, i would say that this could almost have been part of some american grand plan.
IE cripple Iraq, which will invite Iran in, they jump in on the Shi'ite side and awake sleeping richman Saudi, which arms the Sunni's, at the same time lowering world oil price, toppling the Iranian regime and at the same time boosting the US economy with cheap oil.
Oops time to go back to my padded cell....
 
#20
Saudi supporting the Sunni's with big bucks.
I always understood that the reason George I never finnished off Sadam post Gulf I was that Saudi feared what is now happening in Iraq and being the wise old man of long expireance George I listened.
King George II will now delay his announcement of the future of Iraq untill next year, maybe he is hoping for somthing special in his Christmas stocking, Rambo 5 ? no that was Ronnei Ray Gun.
To little old me it looks like another exit from Nam, hand over, wash hands, f-off and leave it to the locals.
john
Sounds like another seasonal tale of 2006 ish years ago.
 

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