Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

CUM

That got your attention :D

The word "cum" got its name from Capt. Sir Mansfield Cumming, who, during WW1, suggested that British Intelligence agents use semen as invisible ink. However, the practice was soon abandoned because of the smell.
1642240499862.jpeg


I'll sniff next time I go past.
 

exspy

LE
The word "cum" got its name from Capt. Sir Mansfield Cumming, "C", first head of the Secret Services, who, during WW1, suggested that British Intelligence agents use semen as invisible ink. However, the practice was soon abandoned because of the smell.

Is it April 1st already?
 
During the US Civil War dozens of regiments based on French Zouaves were raised.

1642257241668.jpeg
 

Chef

LE
During the US Civil War dozens of regiments based on French Zouaves were raised.

View attachment 631578
The military is as prone to fashion statements as any other organisation, for example:

When Marshal Luxembourg was unexpectedly attacked by William of Orange at Steenkirk Camp in 1692 the French officers had no time to tie their cravats merely wrapping them round their neck and pushing the lace ends through a buttonhole in the waistcoat. A new fashion 'cravats a la Steenkerque was born and very popular it was too.

An early version of looking ally I suppose.
Ran Away From The Subscriber: The Steinkirk Cravat
 
The military is as prone to fashion statements as any other organisation, for example:

When Marshal Luxembourg was unexpectedly attacked by William of Orange at Steenkirk Camp in 1692 the French officers had no time to tie their cravats merely wrapping them round their neck and pushing the lace ends through a buttonhole in the waistcoat. A new fashion 'cravats a la Steenkerque was born and very popular it was too.

An early version of looking ally I suppose.
View attachment 631670
A style that I may adopt tomorrow morning when I adgitate the slurry pit.
 
The military is as prone to fashion statements as any other organisation, for example:

When Marshal Luxembourg was unexpectedly attacked by William of Orange at Steenkirk Camp in 1692 the French officers had no time to tie their cravats merely wrapping them round their neck and pushing the lace ends through a buttonhole in the waistcoat. A new fashion 'cravats a la Steenkerque was born and very popular it was too.

An early version of looking ally I suppose.
View attachment 631670
The US Army styled itself after the French Army during the Civil War - ie. the kepi. After 1870 they switched hats. :D
1642274756835.png
 
So why then do the Germans say "Ich komme," and the fFrench say "J'arrive"? Have they also heard of this bloke
The reputable fact checker sites all confirm the origin of the expression, so I guess other countries must have subsequently adopted it.
 
The US 71st Infantry Regiment from NY was known as the American Guard before the ACW. Virulent nativists, to be a member you had to be born in the USA the entire regiment was formed as a bulwark against "Foreign" units like the Irish 69th and the 45th NYI aka (5th German rifles) and Italian 39th Garibaldi riflesThe 71st Regimental QM sgt was Chinese American sergeant Lee, born in NYC.

the 36th NYSV was almost half British army veterans of the Crimea (When amalgamated as the Washington volunteers many deserted).

79th NYSV wore Kilts and Glengarries at Bull Run
 
New York Fire Zouaves at First Bull Run (Manassas).
1642420745218.jpeg



Note the firefighter iconography on their Regimental Color.

There was a great deal of confusion and friendly fire on both sides in this battle, with troops on both sides wearing a misleading variety of uniforms.
It was the first time most had been in battle or even seen the enemy.

During the action portrayed in this painting (taking Griffin’s Battery) the Fire Zouaves were brigaded with, inter alia, New York’s all Irish Fighting 69th. All of the 69th’s Color Guards and reliefs were cut down, and their Color lost. It was saved and recovered by the 11th New York (the Fire Zouaves) and returned to the remnants of the 69th.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
seen elsewhere, this thread fits:

1644665244506.png

Marshal Ernst Busch, the last surrendering German commander, shows himself at Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery's tent.

Luneburg (Germany), May 3, 1945.


Having never heard of the guy I googled him : Ernst Busch (field marshal) - Wikipedia

One of the old regular Army generals Oncle Addy blamed for the collapse of the Eastern Front.

Army Group Northwest[edit]​

Having gradually returned to favour with Hitler, Busch was recalled to duty on 20 March 1945 when he became head of Army Group Northwest. Tasked with defending the portion of German coastline along the North Sea, he had few resources and lacked the respect of many men under his command. Busch surrendered to Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery on 4 May 1945. He died in a prisoner of war camp in Aldershot, England, on 17 July 1945, and was initially buried at Aldershot Military Cemetery[14] before his remains were later re-interred at Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery.[15]
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
seen elsewhere, this thread fits:

View attachment 638940
Marshal Ernst Busch, the last surrendering German commander, shows himself at Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery's tent.

Luneburg (Germany), May 3, 1945.


Having never heard of the guy I googled him : Ernst Busch (field marshal) - Wikipedia

One of the old regular Army generals Oncle Addy blamed for the collapse of the Eastern Front.

Army Group Northwest[edit]​

Having gradually returned to favour with Hitler, Busch was recalled to duty on 20 March 1945 when he became head of Army Group Northwest. Tasked with defending the portion of German coastline along the North Sea, he had few resources and lacked the respect of many men under his command. Busch surrendered to Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery on 4 May 1945. He died in a prisoner of war camp in Aldershot, England, on 17 July 1945, and was initially buried at Aldershot Military Cemetery[14] before his remains were later re-interred at Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery.[15]
Monty still in his PJs too
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
...Whereas the staff officer, in the presence of TWO Field Marshals (even if one of them is the despised Boche) is ramrod straight, thumbs reaching for the seam of his combats......good man, that.
 

syrup

LE
seen elsewhere, this thread fits:

View attachment 638940
Marshal Ernst Busch, the last surrendering German commander, shows himself at Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery's tent.

Luneburg (Germany), May 3, 1945.


Having never heard of the guy I googled him : Ernst Busch (field marshal) - Wikipedia

One of the old regular Army generals Oncle Addy blamed for the collapse of the Eastern Front.

Army Group Northwest[edit]​

Having gradually returned to favour with Hitler, Busch was recalled to duty on 20 March 1945 when he became head of Army Group Northwest. Tasked with defending the portion of German coastline along the North Sea, he had few resources and lacked the respect of many men under his command. Busch surrendered to Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery on 4 May 1945. He died in a prisoner of war camp in Aldershot, England, on 17 July 1945, and was initially buried at Aldershot Military Cemetery[14] before his remains were later re-interred at Cannock Chase German Military Cemetery.[15]


Was that when Monty reportedly asked "What do you want"

Do we know what he died off?
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Disappointment
 
Was that when Monty reportedly asked "What do you want"

Do we know what he died off?
Death by ACC cooking implement, he dared take 2 sausages for breakfast one day in his PoW camp. The story covered up to avoid embarrassing questions from the Red Cross about the death of a rather VIP German officer prisoner in captivity.
 

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