Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

I did a search and don't think this one has been covered on here before.

View attachment 609749

Two US airman flying their unarmed Piper Grasshopper spot a German equivalent Fieseler Fi 156 Storch flying beneath them.

They then shoot it down using their pistols and capture the Germans!

Full dit below.

That must have been one the more bizarre shot downs of WW2. Very reminiscent of the first months of the Great War in 1914, when crews were taking pot shots at each other with service revolvers.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Sat in the Museum next to the rather fabulous diorama of Juno Beach,6th June 1944 reading a brief account of the landings. Came across this nugget:

Allied Free Polish forces carried several lorryloads of British Army uniforms to clothe Polish members of Wehrmacht ' Ost' Battalions as they advanced.

SOURCE

On the Western Front, Polish prisoners were first encountered by the allies in prisoner-of-war camp for Afrika Korps soldiers. After realizing that a high number of prisoners were Polish, the British and the Polish Armed Forces in the West created a special section aimed at recruiting POWs to serve the allied cause. Recruitment efforts intensified in the summer of 1943.[2]

In January 1944, after Henry Maitland Wilson expressed concern over the lack of Polish replacement troops, General Władysław Anders assured him replacements would be recruited at the front lines. In the Polish II Corps, there were 2,500 ex-POWs by June 1944, a number which rose to 18,500 by 1945.[2] Anders' optimism was well-founded, and thanks to POW recruitment the Polish army in the West ended the war as a larger formation than it had started as when the Italian campaign began.
[6]
Ultimately, nearly 90,000 Poles formerly employed by the Wehrmacht served in the Polish Armed Forces in the West.

By Victory Day in 1945, nearly a third of Polish soldiers in the West had formerly served in the German military.
 
"Bazooka Charlie" and his 6 bazooka armed L-4 took out 6 german tanks

53l4.JPG




43-30426 has been found and being restored
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
"Bazooka Charlie" and his 6 bazooka armed L-4 took out 6 german tanks

View attachment 610984



43-30426 has been found and being restored

Thanks for that - lovely story.

Good to know he survived both the war and Hodgkins diagnosis. Brass balls on that man.

I am flying later today in a Cessna 150 which I always thought owed a heck of a lot to the 1930's Piper Cub.

The initiation circuit for the wing-mounted bazookas must have been intriguing - his ground crew must have rigged a row of individual firing switches keyed to each weapon- Fire Starboard One, Two ,Three etc. ?

Unguided Air-to-Ground at 80kts from 1500 feet anyone ?

Loosely ties in with this post on the Wehrmacht's PanzerSchreck regarding firing mechanisms for early AT weapons: https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/what-film-have-you-just-watched.113556/post-11055210

( The loathsome Boche captured a few bazookas in North Africa in 1943 (Kasserine Pass ? ) - reverse engineered them. )
 

maritime

Old-Salt

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Remember, Remember the 5th of November

SOURCE

Fawkes gave his name as John Johnson and was first interrogated by members of the King's Privy chamber, where he remained defiant.[37] When asked by one of the lords what he was doing in possession of so much gunpowder, Fawkes answered that his intention was "to blow you Scotch beggars back to your native mountains."[38]

He identified himself as a 36-year-old Catholic from Netherdale in Yorkshire, and gave his father's name as Thomas and his mother's as Edith Jackson. Wounds on his body noted by his questioners he explained as the effects of pleurisy. Fawkes admitted his intention to blow up the House of Lords, and expressed regret at his failure to do so. His steadfast manner earned him the admiration of King James, who described Fawkes as possessing "a Roman resolution".[39]

James's admiration did not, however, prevent him from ordering on 6 November that "John Johnson" be tortured, to reveal the names of his co-conspirators.[40] He directed that the torture be light at first, referring to the use of manacles, but more severe if necessary, authorising the use of the rack: "the gentler Tortures are to be first used unto him et sic per gradus ad ima tenditur [and so by degrees proceeding to the worst]".[37][41]

Fawkes was transferred to the Tower of London. The King composed a list of questions to be put to "Johnson", such as "as to what he is, For I can never yet hear of any man that knows him", "When and where he learned to speak French?", and "If he was a Papist, who brought him up in it?"[42]

The room in which Fawkes was interrogated subsequently became known as the Guy Fawkes Room.
[43]


Rest in Peace, the only man to ever enter the Houses of Parliament with honest intent.
 
Remember, Remember the 5th of November

SOURCE

Fawkes gave his name as John Johnson and was first interrogated by members of the King's Privy chamber, where he remained defiant.[37] When asked by one of the lords what he was doing in possession of so much gunpowder, Fawkes answered that his intention was "to blow you Scotch beggars back to your native mountains."[38]

He identified himself as a 36-year-old Catholic from Netherdale in Yorkshire, and gave his father's name as Thomas and his mother's as Edith Jackson. Wounds on his body noted by his questioners he explained as the effects of pleurisy. Fawkes admitted his intention to blow up the House of Lords, and expressed regret at his failure to do so. His steadfast manner earned him the admiration of King James, who described Fawkes as possessing "a Roman resolution".[39]

James's admiration did not, however, prevent him from ordering on 6 November that "John Johnson" be tortured, to reveal the names of his co-conspirators.[40] He directed that the torture be light at first, referring to the use of manacles, but more severe if necessary, authorising the use of the rack: "the gentler Tortures are to be first used unto him et sic per gradus ad ima tenditur [and so by degrees proceeding to the worst]".[37][41]

Fawkes was transferred to the Tower of London. The King composed a list of questions to be put to "Johnson", such as "as to what he is, For I can never yet hear of any man that knows him", "When and where he learned to speak French?", and "If he was a Papist, who brought him up in it?"[42]

The room in which Fawkes was interrogated subsequently became known as the Guy Fawkes Room.
[43]


Rest in Peace, the only man to ever enter the Houses of Parliament with honest intent.

Trespasser !!

What shall we do with 'im ?

....................BUUUUURRRRRRNNNN 'IM !!
 
Remember, Remember the 5th of November

SOURCE

Fawkes gave his name as John Johnson and was first interrogated by members of the King's Privy chamber, where he remained defiant.[37] When asked by one of the lords what he was doing in possession of so much gunpowder, Fawkes answered that his intention was "to blow you Scotch beggars back to your native mountains."[38]

He identified himself as a 36-year-old Catholic from Netherdale in Yorkshire, and gave his father's name as Thomas and his mother's as Edith Jackson. Wounds on his body noted by his questioners he explained as the effects of pleurisy. Fawkes admitted his intention to blow up the House of Lords, and expressed regret at his failure to do so. His steadfast manner earned him the admiration of King James, who described Fawkes as possessing "a Roman resolution".[39]

James's admiration did not, however, prevent him from ordering on 6 November that "John Johnson" be tortured, to reveal the names of his co-conspirators.[40] He directed that the torture be light at first, referring to the use of manacles, but more severe if necessary, authorising the use of the rack: "the gentler Tortures are to be first used unto him et sic per gradus ad ima tenditur [and so by degrees proceeding to the worst]".[37][41]

Fawkes was transferred to the Tower of London. The King composed a list of questions to be put to "Johnson", such as "as to what he is, For I can never yet hear of any man that knows him", "When and where he learned to speak French?", and "If he was a Papist, who brought him up in it?"[42]

The room in which Fawkes was interrogated subsequently became known as the Guy Fawkes Room.
[43]


Rest in Peace, the only man to ever enter the Houses of Parliament with honest intent.

He is regarded as a former old boy by St Peter's School in York, who as a consequence do not have guys on their fire
 
He is regarded as a former old boy by St Peter's School in York, who as a consequence do not have guys on their fire

Harry Gration went there for his education. Lucky s0d was also knocking off *Judith.§ The jammy b#st#rd!

*Meaningless to anyone not of a certain age from Yorkshire.

§ How do I know this! I was in the Metropole when they at the groping fully clothed stage, waiting for their taxi.

Have I said, he was a lucky, lucky, b#st#rd?
 
....and the crabs have been serving the same menu ever since....if they were anything like the one i got on a Herc to Norway in 1974. :salut:

I think Horror bags were pretty standard across the Services at that time.

I once got an 'Indulgence Flight ' from Brize to Barbados. It cost me £7.00 and I was told that was to pay for the food.
The same food I had been given a dozen times before boarding a 4 Tonner, coach, etc for an extended journey.

Same egg mayonnaise sarnie with stale, curly-up corners, same packet of crisps that had more salt than potato, same sugary Panda- fizz vomit, and an apple.

Thank **** for the apple
 
Trespasser !!

What shall we do with 'im ?

....................BUUUUURRRRRRNNNN 'IM !!

Well at least you're up front. I find it hilarious the number of Arrsers who are pro-GF (the only honest man to enter Westminster) while being rabidly anti-Catholic.
 
Well at least you're up front. I find it hilarious the number of Arrsers who are pro-GF (the only honest man to enter Westminster) while being rabidly anti-Catholic.

Also worth remembering that Guy Fawkes was NOT burned to death. I think he was sentenced to be hanged, drawn and quartered but avoided that appalling fate by leaping from the ladder and died from a broken neck.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
He is regarded as a former old boy by St Peter's School in York, who as a consequence do not have guys on their fire
Yes.

I have a question for the EOD types. @dingerr @MuddyOldEngineer

The House of Lords in 1604 was a smaller construction than the current Victorian edifice. But still a large building .

' 36 barrels of gunpowder were discovered hidden under piles of faggots and coal.[98] '

Would this have ...um....brought the House down ?

A quarryman writes: Once upon a long ago, I had occasion to visit a slate mine in North Wales. They were (at that time) still using gunpowder rather than gelignite or another more modern explosive because it brought down the slate without excessive splitting.

There was also at some point in the 80s' a bit of debate about the amount of gunpowder involved.
Something to do with all powder being accountable to the Master of Ordnance and therefore not possible for a civilian to amass that much powder without it being noticed.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Yes.

I have a question for the EOD types. @dingerr @MuddyOldEngineer

The House of Lords in 1604 was a smaller construction than the current Victorian edifice. But still a large building .

' 36 barrels of gunpowder were discovered hidden under piles of faggots and coal.[98] '

Would this have ...um....brought the House down ?

A quarryman writes: Once upon a long ago, I had occasion to visit a slate mine in North Wales. They were (at that time) still using gunpowder rather than gelignite or another more modern explosive because it brought down the slate without excessive splitting.

There was also at some point in the 80s' a bit of debate about the amount of gunpowder involved.
Something to do with all powder being accountable to the Master of Ordnance and therefore not possible for a civilian to amass that much powder without it being noticed.
There was a programme a few years ago looked at this. I think they built a scale replica. Can't remember the result.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Answers on a postcard please. Our resident Bolitho/Hornblower/Clarendon may be able to advise.

- Was there a standard size for powder barrels ?

- How much powder did a Royal Navy '74' such as HMS Victory carry when fully stored ?

In the age of fighting sail, magazine explosions in battle ( qv the French flagship L'Orient at the Battle of Nile ) were not uncommon.

1920px-Battle_of_the_Nile%2C_Whitcombe.jpg


( Sadly in both the Battle of Jutland and the loss of HMS Hood, magazine explosions also played a significant part.)

I imagine a ship of Nelson's navy required a considerable weight of powder to sustain 3 broadsides a minute for hours at a time.

@Ninja_Stoker ? @Ravers ?
 

Pteranadon

LE
Book Reviewer
Yes.

I have a question for the EOD types. @dingerr @MuddyOldEngineer

The House of Lords in 1604 was a smaller construction than the current Victorian edifice. But still a large building .

' 36 barrels of gunpowder were discovered hidden under piles of faggots and coal.[98] '

Would this have ...um....brought the House down ?

A quarryman writes: Once upon a long ago, I had occasion to visit a slate mine in North Wales. They were (at that time) still using gunpowder rather than gelignite or another more modern explosive because it brought down the slate without excessive splitting.

There was also at some point in the 80s' a bit of debate about the amount of gunpowder involved.
Something to do with all powder being accountable to the Master of Ordnance and therefore not possible for a civilian to amass that much powder without it being noticed.
Been done
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer

BlipDriver

War Hero
Answers on a postcard please. Our resident Bolitho/Hornblower/Clarendon may be able to advise.

- Was there a standard size for powder barrels ?

- How much powder did a Royal Navy '74' such as HMS Victory carry when fully stored ?

In the age of fighting sail, magazine explosions in battle ( qv the French flagship L'Orient at the Battle of Nile ) were not uncommon.

1920px-Battle_of_the_Nile%2C_Whitcombe.jpg


( Sadly in both the Battle of Jutland and the loss of HMS Hood, magazine explosions also played a significant part.)

I imagine a ship of Nelson's navy required a considerable weight of powder to sustain 3 broadsides a minute for hours at a time.

@Ninja_Stoker ? @Ravers ?
HMS Victory was a 104 gun first-rate, and according to this picture from the HMS Victory Facebook page

It held up to 780 barrels of gunpowder of 90 - 100 lb.
At Trafalgar 17,100 lb (7800kg) were expended, from "HMS Victory Pocket Manual 1805: Admiral Nelson's Flagship At Trafalgar" By Peter Goodwin - Keeper and Curator of HMS Victory for some 20 years.
 
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