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Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

Not quite in the same league as either the Limes Germanicus or the Gorgan wall.

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'The Anastasian Wall, also called the Long Walls of Thrace is a wall fortification built by the Eastern Roman Empire, to protect the city of Constantinople (Istanbul in present-day Turkey) from Barbarian invasion.

'The wall was constructed during the late 5th century and ran for 35-40 miles across the Thracian peninsula, from the Black Sea coast to the Sea of Marmara.

The fortification was built from stone and turf and reached a height of 5 metres, with supporting forts, towers, gates, and ancillary buildings. A ditch and military way ran parallel to ensure the rapid deployment of supplies and troops, similar in function to the Stanegate found alongside Hadrian’s Wall.

The most notable fort called the Büyük Bedesten Wall Fort was constructed near present-day Karamandere and Belgrat, shaped in a typical rectangular plan with four defensive towers in each corner.

The Anastasian Wall had limited effectiveness due to the difficulty of keeping it garrisoned and repaired, with the wall being eventually abandoned by the 7th century and the defensive emphasis relying on the double line of the Theodosian Walls built in the 5th century.

Large quantities of stone and material were robbed for local buildings, with only remnants of the wall still being preserved in remote woodlands.

So they had pikeys even then. :oops:
 
Lockdown doing your head in? Feck all on Netflix or Prime? Things so bad that you've actually watched every grot flick on the Hamster? Twice?

Then send yourself off to sleep with this handy internetz stroll through British Army Field Manuals from the early 1900s!


My particular favourite, The Field Pocket Book 1914


. . . complete with 'Did You Know?' stuff such as an Officer was obliged to carry 6lbs of grain on his saddlery if mounted?

Tons of similar, exciting stuff here: Catalog Record: Field service manual, 1910 : Infantry battalion (Expeditionary force

Joking aside, there's a lot of good 'stuff' in amongst the trivia: if 'Sanitation in The Field' is not your thing, there are digital copies of Fuller's original 'Tanks In The Great War', the book read by certain Reichsheer officers named Rommel and Guderian, the contents of which they used as their own datum:


Whether a casual historian or full-blown anorak, there's something in there to keep you amused.
 

Joe_Private

On ROPS
On ROPs
_____
* RAPC theorized that you didn't contribute NI, they just took it from you. And because your money went down, not up, they were the opposite of increments, so it appeared on your pay statement as Nat Ins D.
RAPC theorised incorrectly then. Class D National Insurance Contributions were a reduced rate of NI paid by people who were contracted out of the additional state pension due to their occupational pension. That included most public sector workers, including Armed Forces.

Can't remember exactly when it was binned, but my annual pay rise that year was less than the increase in NI.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Who did you say it to?
What are their names?
Where do they live?
What is your relationship with them?
What are their political affiliations?
How long have you been a part of the conspiracy against the state ?

[ Okay that's enough Stasi nonsense danggit. Ed ]
 
I think that we are all aware that radio/wireless messages are prone to interception. However I wasn't aware that in WWI trench telephone messages could also be intercepted. Telephone "leakage" could be picked up from up to 2,000 yards away.

 
Watching BBC4 : Secrets of the Berlin Wall.


:jawdrop:

At its height, the Stasi had TWELVE TIMES as many personnel as its Nazi predecessor, the Geheime Staats Polizei (Gestapo).
... per head of population, and 35 times more than the KGB, per head of population.

Still a very good programme. The Jewish guy whose family smuggled him out of Germany before the war, returned to East Germany after the war and was told his family were all dead, "deported east" being a euphemism for dead n concentration camps. Despite this, he described the fall of the Berlin Wall as "the most hurtful day of my life". He had the light in his eyes of a zealot. Similarly the woman indoctrinated in Marx, Engels and Lenin as a teenager who agreed those who died trying to escape East Germany were the broken eggs needed to make the omelette.

The crimes of the state, the insiduous nature of the secret police needed to make socialism "work", the fanatacism of the true believers was chilling and I couldn't help but think they had the exact same worldview as Corbyn, MacDonnell, Milne, Abbot et al. To look at what happened to East Germans is to see the future that lot wanted for us.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
I think that we are all aware that radio/wireless messages are prone to interception. However I wasn't aware that in WWI trench telephone messages could also be intercepted. Telephone "leakage" could be picked up from up to 2,000 yards away.

That might appear pretty dry stuff - but actually there's some amazing background in there to the Somme.

Today's Arrse Kollidge day moment - whilst being generally aware of the sheer scale of ops during WW1 I certainly had not appreciated that by 1918 there were " circa 225,000 " men in the British Army Corps of Royal Engineers.....

Lumme.

' You can never have enough Sappers' anyone ? :)
 
I was reading Peter Hart's The Great War and what struck me was the number of times the french had deaths in excess of 20,000. In 1914 alone. Think how hard the first day of the Somme is burned into this nation's consciousness (by and large, and certainly historically). To have multiple days like that throughout the war, I was really struck by that thought.
 
I was reading Peter Hart's The Great War and what struck me was the number of times the french had deaths in excess of 20,000. In 1914 alone. Think how hard the first day of the Somme is burned into this nation's consciousness (by and large, and certainly historically). To have multiple days like that throughout the war, I was really struck by that thought.
We have a house in France and whenever we travel around I always have a look at the local War Memorials. Whole families lost all the menfolk in the household. We lost over a million men, the French lost over 2 million. It would seem to indicate that however bad our generals were, the French generals were even worse. No wonder there was no enthusiasm for a fight in 1940 - those that came back in 1918 told their sons how poorly led they were.

Bear in mind, also, that France had always had National Service so could mobilise a far larger field force than Britain. Thus, to put it brutally, there were far more men available to be killed.
 

Goatman

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Book Reviewer

The Banana Wars – 10 Quick Facts About America’s Military Interventions in the Caribbean & Latin America


The U.S. occupied six countries in the Americas over 30 years

After the Spanish-American War, U.S. foreign policy in the Western Hemisphere became much more aggressive, leading to a number of interventions and occupations. At various times from 1899 up to 1933, the United States occupied Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Nicaragua, Mexico, Haiti and Honduras. In that same period, it also invaded Panama and Puerto Rico.

-------------------- ------------------------- ------------------------


Several of these wars were fought for control of…fruit

The United Fruit Company was one of several major American corporations with interests in fruit plantations in Central America. Their influence was so great that they quickly became more powerful than the governments of the countries in which they operated, most notably Honduras and Nicaragua. Whenever these private interests were threatened, they called for help from the United States. In Honduras, for example, the United States invaded seven times between 1903 and 1925 to ensure that American companies maintained control of the nation’s banana exports.

This was the origin of the term “banana republic,” coined to describe Honduras’ weak and corrupt government.


-------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------- -----------

The USMC counter-insurgency doctrine in Iraq and Afghanistan was pioneered in the Banana Wars

The Marine’s analyzed its experiences in the conflicts of the early 20th century to produce a manual called Small Wars Operations in 1935. It was revised in 1940, and retitled the Small Wars Manual. It remained the reference on counter-insurgency, with some minor modifications, during the early portions of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, until being replaced by Counterinsurgency in 2006.
 
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