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Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Einstein settled on his 'general' theory in 1915, a decade after he came up with a 'special' theory of relativity that applied a universal speed of light to the assumption that the laws of physics stay the same inside any given frame of reference.
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Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
ON THIS DAY.....

SOURCE

Charles Darwin's return to England

Naturalist Charles Darwin returned to England this day in 1836 after a five-year journey on HMS Beagle, on which he gathered the specimens and observations that led to his theory of evolution by natural selection.


The Chileans have a full-size replica of her in Punta Arenas:




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Some ' Signing-on Cruise ' :)

More here : HMS Beagle

Beagle's first voyage of exploration was to South America, surveying Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego between 1826–30. The second voyage (1831–36) took her to South America and then around the world. Darwin was on board during this voyage, which became one of the most famous and important voyages of exploration ever made. Beagle's third and final voyage (1837–43) surveyed large parts of the Australian coast.

How big was Beagle?
The Beagle measured just 27 metres long and seven metres wide, and weighed 235 tons. She underwent a number of improvements throughout her life on the seas. For example, her hull was reinforced and a mizzen-mast (a third mast) was added to make her more manoeuvrable in shallow coastal waters.

What scientific equipment did she carry?
The Beagle voyages under Captain Robert FitzRoy saw the use of scientific technology such as theodolites, chronometers and barometers used to provide accurate survey information for new charts and, equally important, meteorological data and weather forecasting.

The Darwin voyage was the first time the Beaufort wind scale was used for wind observations. The crew also undertook various experiments and, despite some disappointments, they produced useful results. They were especially successful in the measurement of earthquakes during experiments in 1835.
 
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Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
On 25 November 1944 a V-2 rocket exploded at the Woolworths store in New Cross Road (on the site later occupied by an Iceland supermarket), 168 people were killed, and 121 were seriously injured.

It was London's most devastating V-bombing of the entire war.

On Wednesday 25 November 2009 a new commemorative plaque was unveiled on the site by the Mayor of Lewisham, marking the 65th anniversary of the explosion.
 
I'd read about this in one of Holland's books, but never seen photos of it.

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'Remnants of the Sassanid-era (224 CE–651) Great Wall of Gorgan, a national heritage which is regarded as the longest brick wall in the world, are at the risk of destruction, IRNA reported on Saturday.

'Situated in the city of Gorgan, the capital of northern Golestan province, the defensive wall is about 200 km in length and it was built to prevent the invasion of the northern tribes. It is said to be the longest architectural work of ancient Iran, which was built in 90 years.

'While the city’s cultural heritage officials are making efforts to register the historic structure on the World Heritage List, the slow but continuous destruction of the wall by farmers and owners of agricultural lands in the region has put the wall in serious danger, the report added.

'Also known as Red Wall, which in some ancient texts is referred to as the Red Snake, this wall is the longest brick wall in the world and the third-largest wall in the world after the walls of China and Germany.

'Archaeological excavations have so far identified ditches, brick kilns, earthen dams, water canals, 38 castles, and watchtowers attached to the wall and more than 25 castles in the southern margin of the wall as well as several ancient sites from prehistoric, historic, and Islamic eras.

'Due to the outbreak of coronavirus and the reduction in the number of the domestic and foreign tourists, the province’s Cultural Heritage, Tourism, and Handicrafts Department has launched online visits and virtual tours of the province’s historical sites, and in this regard, a documentation project has commenced on the Great Wall of Gorgan, provincial tourism chief Ahmad Tajari said.

'However, in recent years, as a result of poor monitoring and control, hundreds of thousands of bricks of this historic wall, which has been buried for thousands of years, were looted for the construction of residential buildings in the surrounding areas.

'The Great Wall of Gorgan was added to the National Heritage list in 1999.

'Golestan is reportedly embracing some 2,500 historical and natural sites, with UNESCO-registered Gonbad-e Qabus – a one-millennium-old brick tower – amongst its most famous.'


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Zhopa

War Hero
the third-largest wall in the world after the walls of China and Germany

Something else I never knew... I wasn't aware Germany still had a big wall? Serious question, what might that be referring to?
 
Something else I never knew... I wasn't aware Germany still had a big wall? Serious question, what might that be referring to?
I think the article is referring to the Limes Germanicus built by the Romans. Not sure how much of it is still standing or even evident on the ground.
 
I think the article is referring to the Limes Germanicus built by the Romans. Not sure how much of it is still standing or even evident on the ground.

There's more of a vicus than a wall (so it's more like the Antonine Wall in Scotland), and a rebuilt Roman fort (complete with re-enactors) on the Upper Limes, but the Lower Limes (around Xanten) have extensive settlement ruins are reconstruction (though without the 'frontier' atmosphere of the wooded areas of the Upper Limes.

'The ‘Roman Limes’ represents the border line of the Roman Empire at its greatest extent in the 2nd century AD. It stretched over 5,000 km from the Atlantic coast of northern Britain, through Europe to the Black Sea, and from there to the Red Sea and across North Africa to the Atlantic coast. The remains of the Limes today consist of vestiges of built walls, ditches, forts, fortresses, watchtowers and civilian settlements. Certain elements of the line have been excavated, some reconstructed and a few destroyed. The two sections of the Limes in Germany cover a length of 550 km from the north-west of the country to the Danube in the south-east.'

 
There's more of a vicus than a wall (so it's more like the Antonine Wall in Scotland), and a rebuilt Roman fort (complete with re-enactors) on the Upper Limes, but the Lower Limes (around Xanten) have extensive settlement ruins are reconstruction (though without the 'frontier' atmosphere of the wooded areas of the Upper Limes.
Geographically where in Germany would this be please?
 
Geographically where in Germany would this be please?

From the Lower Rhine on the German-Netherlands frontier to the Main, and then south-east toward the Danube. The bit of exploring we did on the Upper Limes was very evocative in the snows of winter.

Upper Germanic & Raetian Limes

 

Pteranadon

LE
Book Reviewer
Can't equate the two...the point here is agency. I doubt if slaves opted to follow their Boer masters from choice. I think you may be in danger of trying to be too clever.
Boer servants had limited choices following their masters on campaign, but they had every opportunity to avoid incarceration with the families into concentration camps and plenty of opportunities to desert.

Black slaves also served with the army of the Confederate States in non combat roles, though there is evidence that individuals took up arms. Sure they were slaves, but many seem to have attended regimental reunions.
Black Confederates.

Human behaviour is complex. Some people accept or even choose limits to their freedom. The life of a free man can be scary. Look at the problems the DDR citizens faced adjusting to a world where the state did not find them a job and somewhere to live. (or for that matter squaddies when given bank accounts). Some people are attracted to or need structure and discipline someone telling them what to do. I was intrigued by the choices some escaped slaves made to join the Napoleonic Royal Navy or British Army. Several fought at Waterloo - one rising to the rank of Sergeant in the 42nd.

I am not trying to be clever - just bridling what may be blinkered certainties of the binary view. Life was different three hundred years ago. Just because we have decided to become Woke about the past - or react to it, doesn't mean we understand what people thought back then.
 
Something else I never knew... I wasn't aware Germany still had a big wall? Serious question, what might that be referring to?

Not quite in the same league as either the Limes Germanicus or the Gorgan wall.

ant1wall-scaled.jpg


'The Anastasian Wall, also called the Long Walls of Thrace is a wall fortification built by the Eastern Roman Empire, to protect the city of Constantinople (Istanbul in present-day Turkey) from Barbarian invasion.

'The wall was constructed during the late 5th century and ran for 35-40 miles across the Thracian peninsula, from the Black Sea coast to the Sea of Marmara.

The fortification was built from stone and turf and reached a height of 5 metres, with supporting forts, towers, gates, and ancillary buildings. A ditch and military way ran parallel to ensure the rapid deployment of supplies and troops, similar in function to the Stanegate found alongside Hadrian’s Wall.

The most notable fort called the Büyük Bedesten Wall Fort was constructed near present-day Karamandere and Belgrat, shaped in a typical rectangular plan with four defensive towers in each corner.

The Anastasian Wall had limited effectiveness due to the difficulty of keeping it garrisoned and repaired, with the wall being eventually abandoned by the 7th century and the defensive emphasis relying on the double line of the Theodosian Walls built in the 5th century.

Large quantities of stone and material were robbed for local buildings, with only remnants of the wall still being preserved in remote woodlands.

 

syrup

LE
Perhaps the most famous law officer to fight prohibition Eliot Ness was a heavy drinker and was according to some an alcoholic.
He crashed his car whilst drunk and was known to be a heavy "social" drinker.
Al Capone who help to convict on tax evasion made it known via a henchman that every Monday morning two 1000 dollar bills would be on his desk as long as he turned a blind eye to the bootlegging operations.
Ness refused the bribe and eventually died penniless at the age of 54.
 

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