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Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

Well there is a history of breaking old ships and re using their timbers, some houses are older than that and it depended where ships were built in the first place.

Some of the 18th century wrecker's houses in Corwwall still have paling fences from ships they deliberately wrecked. Nasty days, if a man or animal from a ship reached shore alive there was a duty to rescue all and hand the flotsam, the cargo and the vessel, to the authorities. Many apocryphal records are about wreckers swimming out to drown seafarers. Not just Cornwall either, Scots villages and Kent too. I'd quote the books but they went back to the reference section of the library.
Interesting program about the “wreckers” a few months back, but it appears all was not what it seemed. Apparently this was a sort of myth put out by the ship owners largely to cover their own tracks in respect of negligence in maintaining their vessels or using them as insurance losses. Since the unscrupulous still do that it comes as no surprise. However since it was the shipowners doing the complaining the Government was bound to act. Now by the by, Mrs LR treated me to a reprint source of the Customs legislation from between 1791-5 , Cos I’m a sad git like that, and that has been an eye opener ( it being the full Customs Tariff for the time and if you want to know how far Freeport’s go back or bonded warehouses). That said the timbers being flotsam would be salvaged and reused.
 

oldnotbold

War Hero
Following on from the story about the Shannon/Chesapeake battle and freely culled from Wiki.

Admiral of the Fleet Sir Provo William Parry Wallis, GCB (12 April 1791 – 13 February 1892)

HMS Shannon's captain, Brooke was badly wounded and her first lieutenant killed in the action so Lt Wallis took command for the six days it took Shannon and its prize to reach Halifax. He served on, making Vice-Admiral in 1870. That year the retirement scheme provided a clause that officers who had commanded a ship before the end of the Napoleonic Wars should be retained on the active list until they died. This was to stop any of Nelson's captains dying as paupers. The six days Wallis spent in command of Shannon qualified. He made Admiral of the Fleet in December 1875. The Admiralty suggested he retire when he reached his late nineties, as being on the active list meant he was liable for calling up for a seagoing command. Wallis instead replied he was ready to accept one.

Wallis died in 1892 a few months short of his 101st birthday. To cap this off his father had enlisted him into the RN in 1791 when he was four in order to get him onto the seniority ladder, although he didn't go to sea, or indeed actually serve until he joined a ship in 1798. That made a combined service of 96 years from the time his name first appeared on the books of a Royal Navy ship.
 
Sad story.

I have just remembered that one of the La Rochelle U-Boat pens was being used as a repair shop for the local fishing trawlers and was told that others were used for mushroom farms.
Like this:
002_00.jpg

The only U-Boat pens that were successfully penetrated were the ones at Lorient which 617 Squadron attacked with Tallboys. I worked in Bergen for a while with the Norwegian navy and they said that they had tried to destroy the pens with explosives after the war but did not make much headway and gave up in the end. They do use a small island which the Germans had hollowed out and fitted to receive submarines - known locally as Fraggle Rock.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Source

49th (Hertfordshire) Regt

1840 The Wars in China


thumb_image_image_49007.jpg


The attack on Joss House, Chapu, showing Colonel Tomlinson being carried from the field of battle, whilst the 49th are advancing with Colours flying.



In 1840 the 49th was sent from India to take part in the "Opium War" with China, spending two years in China fighting in six major battles at Canton, Amoy, Chusan, Chinhae, Chapoo and the Heights of Chin Keang Foo.

On 18 May 1842 the 49th took part in a joint atack with the 18th Regiment on Joss House, Chapu, which was defended by a large number of Tartars. The commander, Colonel Tomlinson was killed. Every man who attempted to enter the Joss House was killed or wounded. It was evetually entered and captured after the wall was blown in. The Regiment’s casualties this day were the heaviest of the campaign with two officers and eleven other ranks killed and six officers and forty-five men wounded.

n consequence of the distinguished conduct and gallantry displayed by all ranks during the campaign the Regiment was awarded, as a badge, the dragon super-scribed "China".

It was the China Dragon that later became the cap badge of the Royal Berkshire Regiment and formed the centre piece of the Regimental badge of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Royal Regiment and the buttons of the Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment.


1601494780172.png
1601547243049.png
 
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ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
Einstein's law of relativity takes on a whole new meaning, exactly what, I have no idea!
Its all light years over my head.

General or Special?
 

Pteranadon

LE
Book Reviewer
Source

49th (Hertfordshire) Regt

1840 The Wars in China


thumb_image_image_49007.jpg


The attack on Joss House, Chapu, showing Colonel Tomlinson being carried from the field of battle, whilst the 49th are advancing with Colours flying.



In 1840 the 49th was sent from India to take part in the "Opium War" with China, spending two years in China fighting in six major battles at Canton, Amoy, Chusan, Chinhae, Chapoo and the Heights of Chin Keang Foo.

On 18 May 1842 the 49th took part in a joint atack with the 18th Regiment on Joss House, Chapu, which was defended by a large number of Tartars. The commander, Colonel Tomlinson was killed. Every man who attempted to enter the Joss House was killed or wounded. It was evetually entered and captured after the wall was blown in. The Regiment’s casualties this day were the heaviest of the campaign with two officers and eleven other ranks killed and six officers and forty-five men wounded.

n consequence of the distinguished conduct and gallantry displayed by all ranks during the campaign the Regiment was awarded, as a badge, the dragon super-scribed "China".

It was the China Dragon that later became the cap badge of the Royal Berkshire Regiment and formed the centre piece of the Regimental badge of the Duke of Edinburgh’s Royal Regiment and the buttons of the Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment.


View attachment 508648 View attachment 508788
There are/were also several Dragon batteries of the RHA and RFA. P Battery (the Dragon Troop) as well as 111, 127 and 129 Dragon Batteries Bit here 111 (Dragon) Battery RA

The Madras Foot Artillery at the Assault on Chin-Kiang-Foo, 21st July 1842 By David Rowlands


Note that the image file name is called "chink.jpg" Nothing woke about David Rowlands.
 

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