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Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

"In response to the Korean Conflict, the Navy disbanded the Blue Angels and the team reported to Fighter Squadron 191 (VF-191), "Satan's Kittens," aboard the aircraft carrier USS Princeton in 1950. "

 
1752.jpg
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Nice but not true sadly " In 1686, John Aubrey referred to the celebration as "Fooles holy day", the first British reference. On April 1, 1698, several people were tricked into going to the Tower of London to "see the Lions washed"
 
These guys knew the difference. I believe upwards of 20,000 escaped slaves served with British Forces in the revolutionary war...mainly with Army, but plenty found their way aboard. This incident occurred during the war of 1812.

"As HMS Victorious lay at anchor in Lynnhaven Bay, off Norfolk, in the early morning hours of 10 March 1813, a boat approached from the Chesapeake shore.1 Its occupants, nine American Black men drew the attention of the sailors in the guard boat circling the 74 gun ship. The men were runaway slaves. After a cautious inspection, the guard boat’s crew towed them to the Victorious where the nine Black men climbed up the ship’s side and entered freedom. This scene would be repeated many times during the coming twenty-one months. American Blacks came individually and in both small and large groups seeking escape from slavery within the wooden hulls of the British Navy."
Further to that, it seems that we formed a unit of "Colonial Marines" from escaped slaves as well.
So another one to us, we thought of Colonial Marines a long time before Robert A Heinlein did. In your ******* face Bugs. I am not sure if service guaranteed citizenship, but it certainly meant freedom from slavery in the American States.
 
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I read somewhere that amongst sea farers the Royal Navy was something of a cushy billet. Commercial ships sailed with just enough crew as required to man the ship to maximise profits. The Navy sailed with enough men to man the guns: vastly more than was needed just to move the ship about the globe. Food and grog we’re guaranteed and prize money was a possibility. Discipline was brutal but Georgian times were a brutal age thus the navy was not much more savage than elsewhere.
Legend has it that my local pub was founded by an Portuguese guy with prize money from Trafalgar.
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
Lotta bollocks in that post about the calendar. A lot.
Prior to 1752 the start of the year was not April 1st.
It was Lady Day, March 25th. The significance was that it was deemed to be the conception date of Christ, exactly 9 months before Christmas Day.

The reason why Britain stuck with the Julian calendar when most of Europe had changed to the Gregorian in 1582 was because the change was decreed by the Catholic Church in the name of Pope Gregory. Protestant and Orthodox countries were not going to accept any dictate from Rome, Even though we bit the bullet and changed in 1752, the Orthodox churches did not, for much longer. Russia only changed after the 1917 revolution - did you ever wonder why the Soviet Union commemorated the October revolution in November ?
And the Greeks didn’t change until 1922.

Lady Day, being the start of the year, was the start of the financial year as well, when any annual dues such as rents were payable. Because of the “loss” of 11 days in 1752, all these sums came up 11 days earlier, and so it was decided that the dues would henceforth be slipped to April 6th, which is why the financial year in UK is set at this date.
The Julian calendar had long recognized that the solar year was 356.25 days and compensated that quarter day by a leap day every four years. However, no account was taken of the four minutes or so by which the astronomical year differed from 356.25
Gregory’s calendar corrected this by not having a leap year every hundred years except where the year is divisible by 400. That’s why 2000 was a leap year, but 1900 was not.
 
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Russia only changed after the 1917 revolution - did you ever wonder why the Soviet Union commemorated the October revolution in November ?
Another interesting factoid is that the celebration of the Battle of the Boyne, July 1 1690, got shifted to July 12. The Bluenoses changed the date of their annual bellendery cos the Pope told 'em to, as my Granny never tired of telling me.

Isn't there also some confusion over the celebration of Prince Philip's birthday too?
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
Another interesting factoid is that the celebration of the Battle of the Boyne, July 1 1690, got shifted to July 12. The Bluenoses changed the date of their annual bellendery cos the Pope told 'em to, as my Granny never tired of telling me.

Isn't there also some confusion over the celebration of Prince Philip's birthday too?

When dating a letter or other document before 1752 (in England) it was common practice to put OS or NS after the date, to indicate Old/New Style. There’s a famous exchange of letters between Lord Chesterfield and his son, who was doing the Grand Tour, and trying to follow the sequence of replies is frustrating.

I hadn’t thought about Prince Philip, but being born in 1921 In Greece his birth date would have been expressed there in Old Style. The date is now given as 10 June, but Old Style would have been, what, 29 May ?

Edit. Having checked, I was a day out on my mental calculation - Philip’s dob OS was 28 May. The change from Julian to Gregorian in Greece was driven by the Revolution of 1922 which saw the Greek (Danish) Royal family, including the infant Philip, booted out, but the actual date of change was 1923, not 1922 as I stated earlier.
 
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Legend has it that my local pub was founded by an Portuguese guy with prize money from Trafalgar.
That's entirely possible. Ships captured at Trafalgar, were sold as prize and strange though it may seem the entire crews had shares in their prizemoney. That saved the treasury the cost and time of having a ship built as did the provision of either the cannon or the metal for recasting of new cannon. Their rigging cost a few bob too if they could be salvaged. I have no doubt that the treasury were rubbing their hand with glee upon news of the victory because indirectly that led to Napoleon's blockade of 1808- he didn't have the ships. Ships at prize money and their accoutrements were free of any tariffs according to the 1791 tariffs. That's probably why Nelson is so remembered, he added to the kings fleet massively. But as the the French say "C'est la Guerre" :D
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
I recall vaguely the police using the Julian Calendar for something to do with vehicles/driving but damned if I can remember what. There was a copy in the control room.
 
That's entirely possible. Ships captured at Trafalgar, were sold as prize and strange though it may seem the entire crews had shares in their prizemoney. That saved the treasury the cost and time of having a ship built as did the provision of either the cannon or the metal for recasting of new cannon. Their rigging cost a few bob too if they could be salvaged. I have no doubt that the treasury were rubbing their hand with glee upon news of the victory because indirectly that led to Napoleon's blockade of 1808- he didn't have the ships. Ships at prize money and their accoutrements were free of any tariffs according to the 1791 tariffs. That's probably why Nelson is so remembered, he added to the kings fleet massively. But as the the French say "C'est la Guerre" :D
Weren't most of the Trafalgar prize ships subsequently lost in the Biscay in a hurricane before they could be got back to England?
 

4(T)

LE
I recall vaguely the police using the Julian Calendar for something to do with vehicles/driving but damned if I can remember what. There was a copy in the control room.


Maybe it was something to do with with ancient pre-1752 common laws overlaying the modern world, such as the days when sheep could be driven along the highway, or when markets could assemble. A lot of religious and commercial events were originally scheduled under the Julian Calendar.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Maybe it was something to do with with ancient pre-1752 common laws overlaying the modern world, such as the days when sheep could be driven along the highway, or when markets could assemble. A lot of religious and commercial events were originally scheduled under the Julian Calendar.
No it was a certain item used it, it'll come to me eventually probably about 3am
 
I recall vaguely the police using the Julian Calendar for something to do with vehicles/driving but damned if I can remember what. There was a copy in the control room.

Amazing system design, the Police National Computer or PNC, for criminal and DVLA records. Dunno when it started but at least since 1976 to date it is still a black screen with green text and a blinking cursor, and was designed to use the Julian calendar which had to be converted by the operator to the conventional. Upgrades come and go, but it's still no bells and whistles, no windows, no mice, and it's fast as light: most basic searches, of tens of millions of records, come back in less than a second. When all you want is information and you need it fast, resilient systems with operator skills, rather than smiley face icons and little tunes, are still the way to go. Don't fix wot ain't broke.
 
Weren't most of the Trafalgar prize ships subsequently lost in the Biscay in a hurricane before they could be got back to England?
As were some British ships If I recall. Victory herself was dis-masted. I'm not exactly sure how that would have played out viz insurance and lost prize money, but there was money somewhere I'll be bound. But it's also worth bearing in mind that in the ruckus after the battle, people would have looked after themselves- probably not the official version. Also long servers would have either deferred or stashed their prize money. Look on it as a sort of OAP.
Might have been PNC but this was one specific task maybe chassis numbers pre VIN
where there any? Even coach builts had a record of a chassis number. I mean you could be going back to pre Great war
 

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