Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

RigPig

War Hero
Here is something I only found out recently - the a branch of the MoD are still using on a daily basis - an item of kit we 'liberated' from the Nazis.

It still has the Swastika and German Eagle on it too. A very interesting piece of kit indeed.
?
Am I the only one who can’t see what you’re on about? Maybe the picture didn’t attach correctly.

RP
 
Sadly, your gentle play on words closed after the first night :cool:
Just like real theather-land after all.

I actually find the Hollyrood-Wood connection rather funny and it goes back a long way for me. Because Politics is largely theatre. Also from an English perspective Scots politics has the same justification as our WMonster one, "tha' is we're right and you're wrong Pal."

@exspy Summed it up neatly
Some were doubting that he could make those shots with a cheaply made Mannlicher-Carcano blunderbuss. When he was arrested an hour and a half latter at a theatre showing of 12th Night, he was reported to have been shouting "Och, I'm just a patsy, I'm just a patsy!"

@ Helm said
"The original murder weapon, the "Bothwellhaugh Carbine", isn't preserved, but there is a contemporary drawing in the possession of Lord Hamilton, a descendant of the assassin. The brass plaque with which the weapon was marked after the assassination can be clearly seen on the butt ...:
Now why would anyone do that? Sounds like a case for the defence. Where for example is the axe allegedly used on Mary QoS or for that matter the sword used on Anne Boleyn so marked.

All these factors are so familiar to the Hollywoodland concept of the reinvention of history for the convenience of the audience. I think it deserved more than just a premiere.
Incidentally was that carbine originally a snaphaunce or wheelock
1580123900347.png

The bottom drawing around the lock seems to indicate some reworking from an earlier ignition source
 

syrup

LE
It's worth remembering that Hans von Luck, commanding Kampfgrüppe 21. Panzerdivision (or was it 21. Panzerdivision Kampfgrüppe? Whatever, the bloody stump of 21. Panzerdivision) was given command of a company of 15 Tigers from one of the Schwerepanzerabteilungen. They arrived at a railhead and headed off for Caen. Two dodged the bombers. That's how logistics worked for the Heer in Normandy.
Also.worth remembering that when transported by train the Tiger needed to have its tracks changed
The tracks on the Tiger where too wide for the railcars.
They had to remove them replace them with narrow tracks before putting them on the train.
At the other end the process had to be reversed
Not only time consuming but helpfully had all the Tigers stationary when air power was flying round looking for them
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
A number of Imperial Japanese Army officers were tried for Cannibalism after WWII,

The most senior Japanese officer found guilty of cannibalism and hanged was Lieutenant General Yoshio Tachibana.

A book written by a Japanese author in 1997: << Hidden Horrors: Japanese War Crimes In World War II >> refuted the Allies’ conclusion that the Japanese resorted to cannibalism when their supplies dwindled.

Hidden Horrors Japanese War Crimes in World War Ii by Tanaka Toshiyuki - AbeBooks

The author, Toshiyuki Tanaka said this was done under the supervision of senior officers and was perceived as a power projection tool.
 
Something I have just come across...Vladimir II Monomakh, great prince of the Kievan Rus 1113-1125, had an English wife...Gytha of Wessex. **** you Putin.... you soft southern shite.:cool:
 
Just like real theather-land after all.

I actually find the Hollyrood-Wood connection rather funny and it goes back a long way for me. Because Politics is largely theatre. Also from an English perspective Scots politics has the same justification as our WMonster one, "tha' is we're right and you're wrong Pal."

@exspy Summed it up neatly
Some were doubting that he could make those shots with a cheaply made Mannlicher-Carcano blunderbuss. When he was arrested an hour and a half latter at a theatre showing of 12th Night, he was reported to have been shouting "Och, I'm just a patsy, I'm just a patsy!"

@ Helm said
"The original murder weapon, the "Bothwellhaugh Carbine", isn't preserved, but there is a contemporary drawing in the possession of Lord Hamilton, a descendant of the assassin. The brass plaque with which the weapon was marked after the assassination can be clearly seen on the butt ...:
Now why would anyone do that? Sounds like a case for the defence. Where for example is the axe allegedly used on Mary QoS or for that matter the sword used on Anne Boleyn so marked.

All these factors are so familiar to the Hollywoodland concept of the reinvention of history for the convenience of the audience. I think it deserved more than just a premiere.
Incidentally was that carbine originally a snaphaunce or wheelock
View attachment 446037
The bottom drawing around the lock seems to indicate some reworking from an earlier ignition source
It seems to me that you are the one that is making stuff up to satisfy your fanciful Hollyrood-wood connection.

You quote the following as if it were a fact, when the only fact is that @expsy made it all up. For a start, William Shakespeare was 6 years old when James Stewart was assassinated, and the earliest date given for him writing 12th night was 1601.

@exspy Summed it up neatly
Some were doubting that he could make those shots with a cheaply made Mannlicher-Carcano blunderbuss. When he was arrested an hour and a half latter at a theatre showing of 12th Night, he was reported to have been shouting "
Och, I'm just a patsy, I'm just a patsy!"

Your ramblings here, and your eagerness to latch on to someone else's fabricated story seem to open a window into your own anti-Scots bigotry which you quite frequently and openly display. Enjoy your own amusement at the almost-homonym Holyrood/Hollywood, it's a simple pleasure.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
During the period of hyper-inflation under Germany's Weimar Republic in 1923, an egg could cost 60 billion Reichsmarks.

 
Also.worth remembering that when transported by train the Tiger needed to have its tracks changed
The tracks on the Tiger where too wide for the railcars.
They had to remove them replace them with narrow tracks before putting them on the train.
At the other end the process had to be reversed
Not only time consuming but helpfully had all the Tigers stationary when air power was flying round looking for them
Also had to remove the outer roadwheels
 

4(T)

LE
During the period of hyper-inflation under Germany's Weimar Republic in 1923, an egg could cost 60 billion Reichsmarks.


"When money dies" by Adam Fergusson is a good read - a narration of the events of the hyper inflation. Its pretty gripping stuff; grossly incompetent government economic decisions, exacerbated by (mostly French) obstinacy over Versailles Treaty conditions. Horrifying when it describes how people of all backgrounds became utterly destitute, not least because its scarily easy to relate it all to today's precarious financial system. It also gives a good contextual background to the popular rise of the Nazis.
 
"When money dies" by Adam Fergusson is a good read - a narration of the events of the hyper inflation. Its pretty gripping stuff; grossly incompetent government economic decisions, exacerbated by (mostly French) obstinacy over Versailles Treaty conditions. Horrifying when it describes how people of all backgrounds became utterly destitute, not least because its scarily easy to relate it all to today's precarious financial system. It also gives a good contextual background to the popular rise of the Nazis.
I found out the other day that German Grandad was employed in the postWW1 reparations Commission on the German side. It seems his job was to drive livestock over to France and Belgium. I think that was ended around 1925.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
"When money dies" by Adam Fergusson is a good read - a narration of the events of the hyper inflation. Its pretty gripping stuff; grossly incompetent government economic decisions, exacerbated by (mostly French) obstinacy over Versailles Treaty conditions. Horrifying when it describes how people of all backgrounds became utterly destitute, not least because its scarily easy to relate it all to today's precarious financial system. It also gives a good contextual background to the popular rise of the Nazis.
I'd be interested to know if the statement I quoted is verified by that (much more credible) source :)
 
Most will be aware that only 3 people have been awarded the VC twice.

One of those was Arthur Martin-Leake VC*: however, his 1902 Boer War VC was won when he was a Captain though his 1914 second award was named to him as a Lieutenant. This anomaly is explained because, in the Boer War, he was a Surgeon Captain in the South African Constabulary for the duration of that conflict-in 1914, as a civilian Doctor, he volunteered for further service with RAMC.

1582827391512.png


1582827414711.png
 
Most will be aware that only 3 people have been awarded the VC twice.

One of those was Arthur Martin-Leake VC*: however, his 1902 Boer War VC was won when he was a Captain though his 1914 second award was named to him as a Lieutenant. This anomaly is explained because, in the Boer War, he was a Surgeon Captain in the South African Constabulary for the duration of that conflict-in 1914, as a civilian Doctor, he volunteered for further service with RAMC.

View attachment 452488

View attachment 452489
The three double VC recipients are connected. Martin-Leake commanded the Field Ambulance where Chavasse died, and Chavasse was a distant cousin of Upham.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
1919

Soldiers of the 369th 'Harlem Hellfighters' wearing the Cross of War medal pose for a photo on their trip back to New York. In this picture we see: front row (left to right) - Private Ed Williams; Herbert Taylor; Private Leon Fraitor; Private Ralph Hawkins. Back row (l-r) - Sergeant H. D. Prinas; Sergeant Dan Storms; Private Joe Williams; Private Alfred Hanley; and Corporal T. W. Taylor. When America joined the Great War, the first African-American regiment to fight was the 369th Infantry, transported to France at the end of 1917. The racism and discrimination the soldiers encountered had begun during training in America, and continued in Europe, with many white US soldiers refusing to fight alongside the 369th. After April 1918, under the control of the French Army, such discrimination lessened. Nicknamed the “Harlem Hellfighters,” the members of the 369th were renowned for bravery, ability and ferocity. On their return to New York City after 1918, they received a euphoric welcome, marching up Fifth Avenue

WW1 US Infantry - Harlem.jpg


 

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