Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

Enthusiastically backstab the USSR, with the expectation that a Nazi/Soviet war, whatever the outcome, would leave even the victor too exhausted to be of concern, with the American stick to encourage movement Eastward? Germany to return to some approximation of pre-war western borders as the (Anglo) Allies "ask?"
There an element of truth in that Russia was only really a convenience ally, It certainly didn't like the British since their involvement in the civil war and the Germans of course fought there under their victorious masters direction. There was no liking for communism in the West and it has to be remembered that the French in pre WW1 had fostered agreements between tsarist Russia. However the Socialist mentality in France was quite happy to deal with the communists with their own adoption of communists parties in the inter and WW2 years and they still exist. That spilled over in the20- 30's in Germany and North Germany, Berlin, Hamburg etc all were hotbeds of communism which the NS wouldn't tolerate. That's why the Russians do not consider their great patriotic war to be anything but their own.
 

MrMemory

War Hero
Not strictly military history, but interesting nonetheless.

The £20 million debt the UK Government created to implement the Slavery Abolition Act in 1833 wasn’t paid off until 2015.

 
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Not strictly military history, but interesting nonetheless.

The £20 million debt the UK Government created to implement the Slavery Abolition Act in 1883 wasn’t paid off until 2015.

1883? A slip of the finger one suspects.
 

4(T)

LE
Not strictly military history, but interesting nonetheless.

The £20 million debt the UK Government created to implement the Slavery Abolition Act in 1883 wasn’t paid off until 2015.



Presumably thats because nearly all 19th and 20th century government debt (including from both wars) has been repeatedly rolled over to take advantage of decreasing interest rates - i.e. cheap borrowing?

I imagine that the public works debt for constructing latrines in Hong Kong circa 1850 is probably still "being paid off".

Britain was so immensly rich towards the end of the 19th century that we were running an Empire and a 500-ship Navy without even taxing most of the population (no income tax for most, no VAT, no stealth taxes, no inheritance tax, etc). I'm sure we'd have found £20m in loose change down the back of the sofa if there was any ineed to pay down the slavery debt.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Trust the Jocks

On January 23, 1570, the first assassination attempt was carried out with a firearm that is known in history - in Scotland!

In Linlithgow the nobleman James Hamilton of Bothwellhaugh ...

[IMG]

[IMG]

... shoots several times the Scottish regent James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray ...:

[IMG]


The original murder weapon, the "Bothwellhaugh Carbine", isn't preserved, but there is a contemporary drawing in the possession of Lord Hamilton, a descendant of the assassin. The brass plaque with which the weapon was marked after the assassination can be clearly seen on the butt ...:

[IMG]
In addition to political reasons (Hamilton sees his clan disadvantaged), personal feelings of revenge also play a role for Hamilton:
The regent had confiscated much of his land and had distributed it to his favorites.

Stewart is injured so badly that he dies the same day. His body is shown in the next picture - the gunshot wounds are clearly visible

[IMG]
 

MrMemory

War Hero
Quite 1833, have a look at your original post which says 1883. :)
Ahh, I stand corrected (said the man in the orthopaedic shoe)!
 
Trust the Jocks

On January 23, 1570, the first assassination attempt was carried out with a firearm that is known in history - in Scotland!

In Linlithgow the nobleman James Hamilton of Bothwellhaugh ...

[IMG]

[IMG]

... shoots several times the Scottish regent James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray ...:

[IMG]


The original murder weapon, the "Bothwellhaugh Carbine", isn't preserved, but there is a contemporary drawing in the possession of Lord Hamilton, a descendant of the assassin. The brass plaque with which the weapon was marked after the assassination can be clearly seen on the butt ...:

[IMG]
In addition to political reasons (Hamilton sees his clan disadvantaged), personal feelings of revenge also play a role for Hamilton:
The regent had confiscated much of his land and had distributed it to his favorites.

Stewart is injured so badly that he dies the same day. His body is shown in the next picture - the gunshot wounds are clearly visible

[IMG]
Shooting him several times with that weapon either took some impressive reloading drills or the Close Protection Team were a tad tardy.
 
Trust the Jocks

On January 23, 1570, the first assassination attempt was carried out with a firearm that is known in history - in Scotland!

In Linlithgow the nobleman James Hamilton of Bothwellhaugh ...

[IMG]

[IMG]

... shoots several times the Scottish regent James Stewart, 1st Earl of Moray ...:

[IMG]


The original murder weapon, the "Bothwellhaugh Carbine", isn't preserved, but there is a contemporary drawing in the possession of Lord Hamilton, a descendant of the assassin. The brass plaque with which the weapon was marked after the assassination can be clearly seen on the butt ...:

[IMG]
In addition to political reasons (Hamilton sees his clan disadvantaged), personal feelings of revenge also play a role for Hamilton:
The regent had confiscated much of his land and had distributed it to his favorites.

Stewart is injured so badly that he dies the same day. His body is shown in the next picture - the gunshot wounds are clearly visible

[IMG]
Erm wouldn't that suggest that he was in fact shot by several firearms rather than then one, reloading procedure for dem 'tings being what it was? Damn beaten to it.
 
Shooting him several times with that weapon either took some impressive reloading drills or the Close Protection Team were a tad tardy.
Two bullets were fired from one barrel.
Although there was a theory that the second shot had been fired by an accomplice from ye nearby grassy knoll...
 

exspy

LE
Although there was a theory that the second shot had been fired by an accomplice from ye nearby grassy knoll...
Some were doubting that he could make those shots with a cheaply made Mannlicher-Carcano blunderbuss. When he was arrested an hour and a half latter at a theatre showing of 12th Night, he was reported to have been shouting "Och, I'm just a patsy, I'm just a patsy!"
 
Here is something I only found out recently - the a branch of the MoD are still using on a daily basis - an item of kit we 'liberated' from the Nazis.

It still has the Swastika and German Eagle on it too. A very interesting piece of kit indeed.
 
I bet that you didn't know that the Naval Division (particularly Nelson Battalion) were notorious for poor Latrine drills on the front lines in WW1.
"Mud, Blood and Poppycock", great read.

From wiki...
On 17 October, just before the Battle of the Ancre, Paris was wounded and replaced by Major-General Cameron Shute. Shute was appalled by the un-military "nautical" traditions of the division and made numerous unpopular attempts to stamp out negligent hygiene practices and failures to ensure that weapons were kept clean.[22] Following a particularly critical inspection of the trenches, Sub-Lieutenant A. P. Herbert (later a humorist, legal satirist and Member of Parliament), wrote


"... that shit Shute."
:confused::cool::p
So matelots in the Naval Divisions took a (subcontinent) Indian approach to trench hygiene? Dorrrty scutters. :mrgreen:
 
Some were doubting that he could make those shots with a cheaply made Mannlicher-Carcano blunderbuss. When he was arrested an hour and a half latter at a theatre showing of 12th Night, he was reported to have been shouting "Och, I'm just a patsy, I'm just a patsy!"
Ah, he was a time-traveller!

12th Night was written in 1601
 

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