Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
The first pack of ‘Rolo‘ was manufactured in Norwich in 1937, and its popularity spread around the world. ‘Rolo‘ was exported to over 100 countries stretching from Canada to the Cape Verde Islands, Fiji to Finland and Nepal to Nicaragua. The main ‘Rolo‘ plant at Norwich produced two tons an hour.
 
The first pack of ‘Rolo‘ was manufactured in Norwich in 1937, and its popularity spread around the world. ‘Rolo‘ was exported to over 100 countries stretching from Canada to the Cape Verde Islands, Fiji to Finland and Nepal to Nicaragua. The main ‘Rolo‘ plant at Norwich produced two tons an hour.
But they never loved any of us enough to give us their last Rolo's - they just put some of the first production in the rat packs.
 

Slime

LE
But they never loved any of us enough to give us their last Rolo's - they just put some of the first production in the rat packs.
But they loved us enough to make our Rolos the poshest sweets on earth...............

Surely that was the real reason they all had gold leaf so lovingly glued to each one :)
 

Slime

LE

ugly

LE
Moderator
I was told, in 1984, that was because they were rations left over from the Suez crisis. Seemed reasonable.
Probably the same nco who assured you Russians could use our ammo in their weapons but not the other way around.
The foreign wrappers were just batches packed for export that ended up being used for MoD possibly because they were past their best!
 
Topical at the moment, sort of.

The Bayeux Tapestry is the oldest surviving bit of false news. The tapestry as we know it shows the figure under the name Harold with an arrow in the eye.

A 18th century drawing taken from an engraving of the relevant scene of unknown date shows the figure not with an arrow in the eye but holding a spear.

The leading academic authority on the tapestry, Lucien Musset, states that the original has needle holes where the shaft of the spear has been removed. The reason is only speculation but a middle ages punishment for a perjuror was a weapon in the eye so it is probable that the original was altered at some point to an arrow to back up the Norman claim that Harold had committed perjury by swearing on holy relics his support for Williams claim to the English throne in 1064.

False news over 900 years ago so not a new thing.
 
Topical at the moment, sort of.

The Bayeux Tapestry is the oldest surviving bit of false news. The tapestry as we know it shows the figure under the name Harold with an arrow in the eye.

A 18th century drawing taken from an engraving of the relevant scene of unknown date shows the figure not with an arrow in the eye but holding a spear.

The leading academic authority on the tapestry, Lucien Musset, states that the original has needle holes where the shaft of the spear has been removed. The reason is only speculation but a middle ages punishment for a perjuror was a weapon in the eye so it is probable that the original was altered at some point to an arrow to back up the Norman claim that Harold had committed perjury by swearing on holy relics his support for Williams claim to the English throne in 1064.

False news over 900 years ago so not a new thing.
Certainly intriguing, but what can we infer from the alteration of a then 700 year old record of a Battle? I mean the region in which the Bayeaux Tapestry must have been a very important area or was it a Napoleonic thing. Besides it's always been held that oaths sworn under duress were nul and the swearer absolved.
 
Topical at the moment, sort of.

The Bayeux Tapestry is the oldest surviving bit of false news. The tapestry as we know it shows the figure under the name Harold with an arrow in the eye.

A 18th century drawing taken from an engraving of the relevant scene of unknown date shows the figure not with an arrow in the eye but holding a spear.

The leading academic authority on the tapestry, Lucien Musset, states that the original has needle holes where the shaft of the spear has been removed. The reason is only speculation but a middle ages punishment for a perjuror was a weapon in the eye so it is probable that the original was altered at some point to an arrow to back up the Norman claim that Harold had committed perjury by swearing on holy relics his support for Williams claim to the English throne in 1064.

False news over 900 years ago so not a new thing.
Maybe the said tapestry was the forerunner of the daily wail.:rolleyes:
 
Maybe the said tapestry was the forerunner of the daily wail.:rolleyes:
The last bit of the tapestry depicts the fall in house prices along the South coast and the influx of cheap foreign labour after the invasion, so you could be right.
 
Certainly intriguing, but what can we infer from the alteration of a then 700 year old record of a Battle? I mean the region in which the Bayeaux Tapestry must have been a very important area or was it a Napoleonic thing. Besides it's always been held that oaths sworn under duress were nul and the swearer absolved.
The alteration was made before the 18th century. The drawing was made of an old engraving of unknown age. It should be borne in mind that no one outside of Bayeux knew the tapestry (which is technically an embroidery not a tapestry) existed until it was discovered in 1476.

Whether the engraving and alteration was made before or after 1476 no one knows. All that is know is that the "Harold figure" was altered at some point from its original depiction.
 
The last bit of the tapestry depicts the fall in house prices along the South coast and the influx of cheap foreign labour after the invasion, so you could be right.
There are actually two panels missing, the thing is made up of a series of panels not one complete length of cloth.

Perhaps the two missing panels show scenes of such effect on the locals so were removed by the Saxonit or Normaners depending on which side of the Great Hastings debate you were on? :D
 
The alteration was made before the 18th century. The drawing was made of an old engraving of unknown age. It should be borne in mind that no one outside of Bayeux knew the tapestry (which is technically an embroidery not a tapestry) existed until it was discovered in 1476.

Whether the engraving and alteration was made before or after 1476 no one knows. All that is know is that the "Harold figure" was altered at some point from its original depiction.
In 1477 there was the Battle of Nancy which ended with the death of Charles the Bold of Burgundy and is recorded as the end of power for Burgundy. Also Caxton set up his printing press in Westminster in 1476. Burgundy had been an English Ally during the 100 years war and I believe the French considered them faithless. Edward IV had been in Exile in France..... who knows.
 

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