Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
careless...
 
The TV programme last night ( 7-08-2019) "War Factory's" showed just how productive the USA was in the war, the numbers are staggering, one tank every 20 minutes, a liberty ship built in 4 days, and one plane every hour, if repeated it is a must watch experience.
Interesting but that figure of one plane per hour is wrong, unless it relates to just one factory. Between 1940 and 1945 the US produced almost 300,000 aircraft (according to Wikipedia). That averages at 50,000 per year, or six per hour. 96,000 were produced in 1944 alone, or 11 aircraft per hour.

Apologies for squabbling, but it reminded me of accountancy text books which give examples such as Machine A runs for 11,000 hours per year, Machine B runs for 14,000 hours per year etc, oblivious to the fact that there are only 8,760 hours per year.
 
The TV programme last night ( 7-08-2019) "War Factory's" showed just how productive the USA was in the war, the numbers are staggering, one tank every 20 minutes, a liberty ship built in 4 days, and one plane every hour, if repeated it is a must watch experience.
 
On Tuesday evening, at the local shooting club, we were talking about how Wesel was almost entirely destroyed during op VARSITY. One of the young fellas told us that his grandfather's 'new' barn is built entirely of glider parts, abandoned after the landings. I have made a date with him, for next week, to go and have a look. Hopefully I'll come back with a few recognisable pics and post them here.
 
On Tuesday evening, at the local shooting club, we were talking about how Wesel was almost entirely destroyed during op VARSITY. One of the young fellas told us that his grandfather's 'new' barn is built entirely of glider parts, abandoned after the landings. I have made a date with him, for next week, to go and have a look. Hopefully I'll come back with a few recognisable pics and post them here.
If Grandfather is still there you might not come back at all. :oops:
 

Serpico

Old-Salt

Just found out a Scot once tried to kill Franco. Best bit is where an Argie newspaper claims he was a transvestite because of the kilt in his luggage, hahaha
 
I have been reading a history book recently which referred to British Army bands performing Sunday public concerts in Australian towns during the 19th Century. It also mentioned that many professional musicians in that era were ex Army Bandsmen.

I did not realise we ever garrisoned Oz back in the day, although my old Regiment (Queen's Regiment) did have New Zealand listed as a battle honour following the Maori Wars.

Anyway, Google being my friend, apparently 24 British Infantry regiments served in Australia between 1818 and 1870; along with detachments from the Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers.

British Regiments in Australia

Every day a schoolday... :)
 
I have been reading a history book recently which referred to British Army bands performing Sunday public concerts in Australian towns during the 19th Century. It also mentioned that many professional musicians in that era were ex Army Bandsmen.

I did not realise we ever garrisoned Oz back in the day, although my old Regiment (Queen's Regiment) did have New Zealand listed as a battle honour following the Maori Wars.

Anyway, Google being my friend, apparently 24 British Infantry regiments served in Australia between 1818 and 1870; along with detachments from the Royal Artillery and Royal Engineers.

British Regiments in Australia

Every day a schoolday... :)
Why are Queens Regiment and Vegans so alike?
They let you know the fact in the first paragraph.
 
@ Jack Prior . Just read your two posts of July. Well yers, there was certainly an element of resistance to Hitler particularly by the Communists in North Germany-who had a legacy going back the the first lot when Wilhelm sanctioned Lenin to cross Germany territory to undermine the Russians. The point is that Marxism was first printed in German in London in the 1880's, which meant that Germany had it's fair share of Communists too. They still do and so do we. The 1930's became a battle ground between Communism and NS and point that neither Molotov, Ribbentrop et al could not avoided knowing about in those "Pragmatic times"

There was of course the Royalist entity, who wanted the Monarch back, which included the officer elites-who had sworn their oath of alleigiance to Wilhelm, just like we swear an oath to the Queen and that "Eidt" meant something. But just where do you draw the line between Communism and NS, anymore that the SWP belong to Labour which has a Marxist as a leader, but is not a "Communist". If you like you now have a soft communist Socialist sect masquerading a socialism in Europe. The idiocy is that they cannot control the way capitalism works-nor do the leaders want to, because, of course a soft life with all the trimmings is emminently better than a Hair shirt and Austerity and where do we hear that word?

It has been convenient not to admit to a form of resistance and Germany having been occupied from 1945-arguably til reunification and subsequently "Europeanised" would rather not bother about a period that technically never existed in Europe and it's also a convenient Narrative for Brussels along with others that they Kept the peace. For the Communists the control of Capital for the masses has been translated to the control of Capital for themselves.
 

Just found out a Scot once tried to kill Franco. Best bit is where an Argie newspaper claims he was a transvestite because of the kilt in his luggage, hahaha
I know him, he used to be a bit "intense" to say the least.
 
Really aye? Small world eh, he does seem like he's a touch intense but fair play to him, is he a Celtic fan by any chance?

Tell him I've spat on Franco's grave in the Valle de los Caidos
Hamilton Accies, I think, he grew up in Blantyre, he was born in Partick in the 40s so probably not a fish eater.

I found this in a book review.

"He was strongly influenced - as the book’s title makes clear - by his redoubtable grandmother, Agnes, a strict Presbyterian, whom he describes as "equal parts John Knox and village community".
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
Business trip to Madrid ca.1973, host driving me in from the airport and a cop on every street corner so maybe Franco on his way. Host tells me of joke of F on his deathbed, hears major sussuration from outside the window . 'What's going on?' 'It's the people, Caudillo, they have come to say good-bye.' 'Why? Who's going?'
 

syrup

LE

Did it mention General Motors' (or Ford's) war production in Germany or the fact they sued the allies at the end of the war for the bomb damage done to their factories?
Don't forget Coke who up until Germany declared war on America to support Japan still supplied the Coke syrup to Germany.
The Germans replaced the Coke Syrup with Fruit and renamed it Fanta after an employee declared it was Fantastic when he tasted it.
After the War the Coke Corporation claimed it along with their factories and made former Paratrooper and Heavy Weight Boxer Max Schmelling the man in charge
 
On Tuesday evening, at the local shooting club, we were talking about how Wesel was almost entirely destroyed during op VARSITY. One of the young fellas told us that his grandfather's 'new' barn is built entirely of glider parts, abandoned after the landings. I have made a date with him, for next week, to go and have a look. Hopefully I'll come back with a few recognisable pics and post them here.
I haven't been yet. Probably this weekend.
 
The Major Fuller character in A Bridge Too Far portrayed Sir Brian E. Urquhart, 1st Airborne Corps Intelligence Officer working on the planning during 'Market Garden' in September 1944. Many here will already know that Urquhart was seriously worried about the Op, citing 21st Army Group's intelligence summaries and Dutch INT.

Considering the level of knowledge this site is famous for, I'll stick to referenced info and the best of my knowledge. Just to be safe ;) The Dutch underground had indicated that two German Panzer divisions of II SS Panzer Corps were bivvied near Arnhem. Urquhart asked the RAF to recce the area, and produced oblique aerial photos to prove it.

In the film, 'Fuller' gets sent on sick leave, out of the way. In reality, Browning dismissed Urquhart's warnings as those of a “nervous child suffering from a nightmare,” and Urquhart was sent on sick leave for “nervous strain and exhaustion.” See 'General Boy: The life of Lieutenant General Sir Frederick Browning' by Richard Mead (Pen & Sword, 2010 ISBN: 978 1 84884 181 9) pp. 122-23. No offence to Browning.

Arnhem 1944: The Airborne Battle by Martin Middlebrook (recent).

As far as I know, Brian Urquhart is still alive, at 100. He was involved in setting up the UN in 1945, assisting the Executive Committee under the UN Charter. Also organised the first U.N. peacekeeping force, and served as UN Undersecretary-General.
 

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