Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

" he was afraid of all the wronged British husbands and boyfriends he'd have to avoid when they were de-mobbed."
as they used to say in Lancashire
"if Bob's your Uncle who's your Father ? "

john


'
 
Something I didn't know about history, until about ten years ago, was the Peterloo Massacre (A little bit over-dramatised) in Manchester. That might not be so strange until you consider that I grew up in Stretford and many of my antecedents would have been inolved. It was just never mentioned...at all...ever.
 
Are you thinking of Baronet Oswald Ernald Mosley?

Michael Mosley of BBC TV is his grandson - and as affable a guy in person as he is on screen.......I spent a fortnight with him in Camp Bastion some while ago.




Yes but according to my Gran he always referred to him as our great leader Edward. I have no idea why and she’s long since passed. I thought I would continue with the family tradition. Although I have no idea why ?
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
A family full of republican, catholic’s with a huge chip on their shoulder about a united Ireland. Trust me you would hate them. When I joined up they were over the moon.
And sent a grammar blind leprechaun with a sackful of punctuation to help you through life.
 
And sent a grammar blind leprechaun with a sackful of punctuation to help you through life.
That would have been funny about 10 years ago. Your one of those people with nothing of importance to say, but feel the need to speak. Even though when you open your mouth no one listens. I’ve a got a programme that checks grammar and spelling. Just like you I don’t pay much attention to it, because it frankly just doesn’t matter.
 
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Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
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That would have been funny about 10 years ago. Your one of those people with nothing of importance to say, but feel the need to speak. Even though when you open your mouth no one listens. I’ve a got a programme that checks grammar and spelling. Just like you I don’t pay much attention to it, because it frankly just doesn’t matter.
Better ditch the programme anyway. It didn't pick up your misuse of your when you really meant you're. :)
 
How's about we all post one interesting but little known fact to do with military history? Well, I'd find it interesting and, besides, I can't get to the pub just yet... :)

Starter for ten: During the period of the Napoleonic Wars, French propaganda compared the struggle between Britain and France to the Punic Wars, casting France in the role of Rome (a new, revolutionary kind of empire on a mission to teach civilisation and citizenship to the world) and painting Britain as the heir of Carthage (a greedy and rapacious trading empire concerned only with profit margins). It's quite an interesting perspective, really, and stands up to more than a cursory glance once you strip away the over-positive view of Rome/France and some of the negative barbs directed at Britain/Carthage. The major difference, of course, is that Hannibal lost while Wellington won (and he didn't even need any elephants).

Over to you!
Well, as Rome had burned Carthage before leaving no stone atop another, sown the fields with salt, put all the males to the sword and sold everyone else into slavery, there remained no one to say anything to the contrary.

The victors write the history.

The Napoleonic Wars were not Britain -v- France, though, it was France trying to conquer all Europe, and the Americas. With their reluctant allies, Spain, 'Mexico' extended up the west coast to within sight of the Columbia River, Oregon, 200 miles from Vancouver.
On the East Coast, 'New France' (Canada) extended south to the Caribbean, hemming the British colony between themselves and the Atlantic.

When 'New France' fell to the English it caused a problem for Paris. The French Canadians were a symbol of that defeat and could never be allowed home, but they were good Catholics and the Pope wasn't up for their being tainted by English Protestantism, so the solution was the fever infested jungles of French Guiana, where most of them lived foreshortened lives.

Well off- topic: Devil's Island, French Guiana, BTW. Nothing at all like the one portrayed in the original movie of Papillon. Low lying, rocky, in close company with two other similar rock islands,Isle Royale, and Isle St Joseph, with prisons, that create an unsurvivable tidal race that made the building of simple cable cars between the islands, essential.
The three islands are the tip of a very ancient submerged volcano.
(As always, found the research fascinating and absorbing, when writing Armageddon's Song)
 
Well, as Rome had burned Carthage before leaving no stone atop another, sown the fields with salt, put all the males to the sword and sold everyone else into slavery, there remained no one to say anything to the contrary.

The victors write the history.

The Napoleonic Wars were not Britain -v- France, though, it was France trying to conquer all Europe, and the Americas. With their reluctant allies, Spain, 'Mexico' extended up the west coast to within sight of the Columbia River, Oregon, 200 miles from Vancouver.
On the East Coast, 'New France' (Canada) extended south to the Caribbean, hemming the British colony between themselves and the Atlantic.

When 'New France' fell to the English it caused a problem for Paris. The French Canadians were a symbol of that defeat and could never be allowed home, but they were good Catholics and the Pope wasn't up for their being tainted by English Protestantism, so the solution was the fever infested jungles of French Guiana, where most of them lived foreshortened lives.

Well off- topic: Devil's Island, French Guiana, BTW. Nothing at all like the one portrayed in the original movie of Papillon. Low lying, rocky, in close company with two other similar rock islands,Isle Royale, and Isle St Joseph, with prisons, that create an unsurvivable tidal race that made the building of simple cable cars between the islands, essential.
The three islands are the tip of a very ancient submerged volcano.
(As always, found the research fascinating and absorbing, when writing Armageddon's Song)
I'm confused. The French were effectively thrown out of North America during the Seven Years War. The writing on the wall being obvious to all after their defeat at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham outside Quebec. In 1759. Ten years before Napoleon was born. So not the Napoleonic Wars then.
 
Well, as Rome had burned Carthage before leaving no stone atop another, sown the fields with salt, put all the males to the sword and sold everyone else into slavery, there remained no one to say anything to the contrary.

The victors write the history.

The Napoleonic Wars were not Britain -v- France, though, it was France trying to conquer all Europe, and the Americas. With their reluctant allies, Spain, 'Mexico' extended up the west coast to within sight of the Columbia River, Oregon, 200 miles from Vancouver.
On the East Coast, 'New France' (Canada) extended south to the Caribbean, hemming the British colony between themselves and the Atlantic.

When 'New France' fell to the English it caused a problem for Paris. The French Canadians were a symbol of that defeat and could never be allowed home, but they were good Catholics and the Pope wasn't up for their being tainted by English Protestantism, so the solution was the fever infested jungles of French Guiana, where most of them lived foreshortened lives.

Well off- topic: Devil's Island, French Guiana, BTW. Nothing at all like the one portrayed in the original movie of Papillon. Low lying, rocky, in close company with two other similar rock islands,Isle Royale, and Isle St Joseph, with prisons, that create an unsurvivable tidal race that made the building of simple cable cars between the islands, essential.
The three islands are the tip of a very ancient submerged volcano.
(As always, found the research fascinating and absorbing, when writing Armageddon's Song)
Excuse my perplexity, wasn’t that silver screen snippet of French penal exile filmed on and around the actual well you know prison itself or was the leper’s colony actually sandbank Street Glasgow
 
Excuse my perplexity, wasn’t that silver screen snippet of French penal exile filmed on and around the actual well you know prison itself or was the leper’s colony actually sandbank Street Glasgow
Jamaica apparently, although the cliff jumping scene was shot in Hawaii. The shots of the former prison at the beginning and end were gen though.

As much as I hate to admit it, because I love the book, Papillon is generally accepted to be at best a heavily exaggerated compendium of prison dits and at worst somewhat Bugsyesque in it's relationship with the truth.
 
I'm confused. The French were effectively thrown out of North America during the Seven Years War. The writing on the wall being obvious to all after their defeat at the Battle of the Plains of Abraham outside Quebec. In 1759. Ten years before Napoleon was born. So not the Napoleonic Wars then.
If it was
Day #1 - sat in cell dig bugger all.
until Day #14337 - sat in cell did bugger all
It wouldn't have been such a big seller, would it?
 
If it was
Day #1 - sat in cell dig bugger all.
until Day #14337 - sat in cell did bugger all
It wouldn't have been such a big seller, would it?
Anne Frank did ok out of similar...

Monday - Stayed in.

Tuesday - Stayed in.

Wednesday - Thought about going out, stayed in.

Thursday - Awesome! Dad's bought me a drum kit!!

..........................
 
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