Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

Its
German and Italian POWs working on UK farms had a red square or triangle on their backs , to be easily seen if they ran away.

They took so many in the first days after DDay they ran out of patches.
They were also treated very well even going out to watch a footy match.

View attachment 358188
Its the only way some Welsh teams could get any spectators.
 
German and Italian POWs working on UK farms had a red square or triangle on their backs , to be easily seen if they ran away.

They took so many in the first days after DDay they ran out of patches.
They were also treated very well even going out to watch a footy match.

View attachment 358188
The italian prisoners in the old POW camp in the village I grew up in didn't have any red patches or other means of recognition.

They had free run of the local area with the exception of the pubs, and often visited locals on Sundays after being invited for Sunday lunch.
 
The attitude towards Italian POWs always seemed to be more easy going. My grandfather ran a POW camp in India, the Italians used to let themselves in at night.

They also made Parker 51 copies there.
 
The italian prisoners in the old POW camp in the village I grew up in didn't have any red patches or other means of recognition.

They had free run of the local area with the exception of the pubs, and often visited locals on Sundays after being invited for Sunday lunch.
In the US after the Italians became co belligerents ,most were recruited into ''Italian Service Units'' and made into agricultural workers paid a salary. 1 was lynched by Black GI's in Washington State during a riot in 1944. Others were roughed up here or there in various camps but overall Italian POW's were looked on as victims of Mussolini unlike German POW's
 
In the US after the Italians became co belligerents ,most were recruited into ''Italian Service Units'' and made into agricultural workers paid a salary. 1 was lynched by Black GI's in Washington State during a riot in 1944. Others were roughed up here or there in various camps but overall Italian POW's were looked on as victims of Mussolini unlike German POW's
The Italian POWs that came to the West country during the war, many stayed on afterwards, they are now second generation, the father and sons made fine carpenters and house builders, cafe owners barbers etc...the type of integration that most on here would agree with.
 
The italian prisoners in the old POW camp in the village I grew up in didn't have any red patches or other means of recognition.

They had free run of the local area with the exception of the pubs, and often visited locals on Sundays after being invited for Sunday lunch.
They changed side half way through and got a free pass. Many repatriated.
 
The Guards Shop at Wellington Bks was built in 1945. It was originally the prison built to house the British Free Corps prisoners whilst they were awaiting trial for treason.
The name of the BFC man awarded a German combat decoration in Russia was Thomas Heller Cooper. He was awarded the Wound Badge in black for being wounded once in action, at the time he was serving with the Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler.
Next to the Duke of York's HQ in Chelsea is a large block of flats called Whitelands House. In the early 1930s another building stood on that site called the Black House; it was the original HQ of the British Union of Fascists, before Mosley moved his party HQ to the East End of London. The Black House was hit by a V-2 rocket in 1944.
Tommy Ryan (he was known by other names) was one of Edward Mosley's right-hand men. He was born in Cork in Ireland and as a child was brought to Wales by this mother, he was also a bare-knuckle fighter and had large burn holes in his upper arms from working in the Steelworks in Cardiff that you could poke your fingers in. He could often be seen on his soapbox preaching to the public wearing his black shirt buttoned up tight.

He was a nasty man and a hard drinker, it was rumored that he also had another family in London and used to satellite between them both although both wives or families never met.

He was also my Great Grandfather.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Tommy Ryan (he was known by other names) was one of Edward Mosley's right-hand men.
He was also my Great Grandfather.
Are you thinking of Baronet Oswald Ernald Mosley?

Michael Mosley of BBC TV is his grandson - and as affable a guy in person as he is on screen.......I spent a fortnight with him in Camp Bastion some while ago.




 
Tommy Ryan (he was known by other names) was one of Edward Mosley's right-hand men. He was born in Cork in Ireland and as a child was brought to Wales by this mother, he was also a bare-knuckle fighter and had large burn holes in his upper arms from working in the Steelworks in Cardiff that you could poke your fingers in. He could often be seen on his soapbox preaching to the public wearing his black shirt buttoned up tight.

He was a nasty man and a hard drinker, it was rumored that he also had another family in London and used to satellite between them both although both wives or families never met.

He was also my Great Grandfather.
You remind me of that bit in Bottom, when Eddie Hitler is asked, after stating his name 'No relation?'

'Sadly, yes..' He replies.
 
They changed side half way through and got a free pass. Many repatriated.
Yes, I know.
Quite a few stayed in the area from the camp mentioned above, and lived in England their whole lives.
Doing a bit of research on local history it was nice to find that many who returned to Italy stayed in touch as pen pals of local families.
 
The Italian POWs that came to the West country during the war, many stayed on afterwards, they are now second generation, the father and sons made fine carpenters and house builders, cafe owners barbers etc...the type of integration that most on here would agree with.
Similar thing in the Aylesbury area as i grew up many tradesmen were Italian the best being of course the baker!!
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
Although the Wright brothers first flew in America in 1903, the US aircraft industry didn't make substantial progress until 1917.

That was because all the early US aircraft firms took out dozens of patents - some trivial. Rival aircraft firms would then sue and counter-sue each other for patent infringement, making firms reluctant to manufacture aircraft for fear of legal action.

It wasn't until 1917 - after America got involved in the Great War - that the US government, alarmed at the implications for military aircraft manufacture, stepped in, knocked heads together and forced the aircraft companies to pool their patents. Manufacture then ramped up fast.

Wordsmith
 
You remind me of that bit in Bottom, when Eddie Hitler is asked, after stating his name 'No relation?'

'Sadly, yes..' He replies.
Go on youtube and listen to an interview by the daughter of Herman Goering, Edda Goering, chatting about her father. It was during the 1970s, she was one hell of an attractive women. The many German comments on there declare that she speaks the best German that they have ever heard.
 
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I met an old guy in Italy who spoke English with a distinct Lancashire accent. He'd been captured in Libya and spent years at camps around the Bolton area. He said that he had a wonderful war and the only reason that he left was that he was afraid of all the wronged British husbands and boyfriends he'd have to avoid when they were de-mobbed.
 
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