Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

AlienFTM

MIA
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If it hadn't been for a maid not doing as she was asked this tale would never have emerged.
Historical Heroines: The Perfect Gentleman
There was a 15th Hussar (or Light Dragoon depending on the date, which I cannot remember offhand) who rose to the rank of Sergeant and wasn't outed as a woman despite being wounded in battle a few times.

Left the army, married an infantryman and had children
 

Goatman

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The 1st Chinese Regiment was created in 1898 from men of Shantung Province led by British officers and Colour Sergeants.[2] Army Order No 2 of 1899 approved the raising of a Chinese regiment of 1,000 men. Major Hamilton Bower of the Indian Staff Corps was given the local rank of lieutenant colonel and appointed Commandant of the new regiment. British officers started to arrive in late 1898 and the regiment first appeared in the Army List, preceded by the Hong Kong Regiment (not to be confused with the later Royal Hong Kong Regiment), in January 1899.[3]

The Regiment was highly regarded for its drill, military appearance and marksmanship.[4]

By 1900 the Regiment consisted of 420 men organised into seven companies.[5]



The Regiment on active service during the Boxer Rebellion


The Regiment sent 200 men in 4 companies led by Lt Col. Bower to serve in the Boxer Rebellion, arriving in Tientsen on 24 June 1900.[7] The men of the regiment fought alongside United States Marines led by Smedley Butler.[8][9] Two British captains and 21 Chinese NCOs and other ranks were killed, two majors, one colour sergeant and 15 Chinese NCOs and other ranks were wounded during this campaign.[10]


By 1902 the regiment consisted of over 1200 men organised into 12 companies.
 

Goatman

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How many died to Hitler's Panzers and how many to Stalin's orders I wonder
No. Bit of confusion there Fusilier?....no panzers were involved. And the commissars were too busy shooting Soviet soldiers attempting to withdraw from frontline positions.

The 2M Soviet POWs were the ones who died in German captivity after they became prisoners.
cf World at War, narrated by Laurence Olivier Episode 26 - Remember

There's a shot in which a column of Soviet POWs marches,stumbles,runs past the Signaal cameraman. The column is five or six wide and stretches to the horizon.
Olivier's narration says
'Of the men you see only four in a hundred survived the war'
 
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No. Bit of confusion there Fusilier?....no panzers were involved. And the commissars were too busy shooting Soviet soldiers attempting to withdraw from frontline positions.

The 2M Soviet POWs were the ones who died in German captivity after they became prisoners.
cf World at War, narrated by Laurence Olivier Episode 26 - Remember

There's a shot in which a column of Soviet POWs marches,stumbles,runs past the Signaal cameraman. The column is five or six wide and stretches to the horizon.
Olivier's narration says
'Of the men you see only four in a hundred survived the war'
No confusion here , I'm fairly sure that Stalins regime was responsible for more Russian deaths that the boxheads
 

Goatman

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So what happened to them?

Cheers,
Dan.

Good question. In WW1, China was technically neutral so Chinese soldiers could not be shipped over to fight in France, unlike Chinese Labour Corps.
These days , they could re-muster.

Ah...Wiki is your friend:

Link
In spite of its excellent record the regiment was ordered to be totally disbanded on 1 June 1906[13][14] by Army Order No.127 of 1906.[15] The reason appears to have been primarily a financial one, after the decision was made not to develop Wei-hai-wei as a naval base.

Some of the soldiers were retained as a permanent police force with three of the British Colour Sergeants commissioned as police inspectors. In 1910 the police force was commanded by three European Inspectors, one being Colour Sergeant Purdon who was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal in the Boxer Rebellion, and the others being C/Sgt Alfred Whittaker and C/Sgt Young.[16] The remainder of the force consisted of 55 Chinese Constables,[17]


The original second-in-command (2IC) and later commander of the Regiment, Colonel Clarence Dalrymple Bruce, became Captain Superintendent commanding the Shanghai Municipal Police from 1907 to 1913. During the First World War, the Chinese Labour Corps was recruited in Weihaiwei for service in France. The unit's commanding officer was Colonel Bryan Charles Fairfax who had served as a lieutenant with the Chinese Regiment in the Boxer Rebellion, the unit's 2IC was Major Purdon, who was later promoted to colonel and succeeded Colonel Fairfax.[18]

Back then, there were all sorts of mumblings about using Native troops to kill (white) Europeans. Didn't seem to stop the French using Senegalese, Maghreb troops etc in their lines.



Source:

During the 1890s and early 1900s the Indo-Chinese tirailleurs saw on-going service against pirates and bandits within the boundaries of present-day Vietnam. Because of unwarranted doubts about their reliability the Tonkinese units were normally accompanied by detachments of French Colonial Infantry or Foreign Legionaires.[16] A fifth regiment of Tonkinese Rifles (5th R.T.T.) was raised in 1902 but was disbanded in 1908.

On the outbreak of World War I many of the French officers and non-commissioned officers of the tirailleurs tonkinois and tirailleurs annamite were recalled to France. One battalion of Tonkinese riflemen (6th B.T.I.) subsequently saw service on the Western Front near Verdun.[17]

In 1915 a battalion of the 3rd Regiment of Tonkinese Rifles (3rd R.T.T.) was sent to China to garrison the French Concession in Shanghai. The tirailleurs remaining in Indo-China saw service in 1917 in putting down a mutiny of the Garde Indignene (native gendarmerie) in Thai Nguen. In August 1918 three companies of tirailleurs tonkinois formed part of a battalion of French Colonial Infantry sent to Siberia as part of the Allied intervention following the Russian Revolution.[18]


Enseigner la mémoire ? - Les soldats indigènes, oubliés des deux guerres mondiales - L'Armée coloniale indigène pendant la 1ère guerre mondiale


Au total, entre 1914 et 1918, plus de 275 000 soldats indigènes ont servi dans l'Armée coloniale :
- 181 512 tirailleurs dits « sénégalais » mais venant en réalité de toute l'Afrique occidentale et équatoriale française, les plus nombreux, répartis au sein de 141 Bataillons de tirailleurs africains qui constituaient l'essentiel de ce que le général MANGIN appelait « la Force noire » ;
- 41 355 Malgaches ;
- 2 434 Somalis ;
- 48 922 Indochinois ;
- 1 067 Canaques et Polynésiens.

A la fin de la guerre en novembre 1918, leurs pertes totales s'élevaient à 28 700 morts
et 6 500 disparus ( 3 ).
 
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Goatman

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No confusion here , I'm fairly sure that Stalins regime was responsible for more Russian deaths that the boxheads
Without doubt...but unrelated to my earlier post.
 

Goatman

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In Victorian London, the River Branch of the Metropolitan Police ( which actually pre-dated the formation of the Met) were routinely armed with cutlasses. This spread to other cities where riverine crime against sailors and shipping was commonplace.

cutlasses | Victorian Policing


the Victorian police were routinely trained in the use of cutlasses, which were then issued to the men if a riot or serious disturbance was anticipated.



( Sam Vimes prefers to rely on Mrs Figgins' Little Persuader)
 
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Goatman

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Gracefully said - and none needed Sir.:salut:
 

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