Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

Captain William Wharton’s story is told on Waterloo 200, he fought with 73rd Regiment in the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo in 1815, and was severely wounded at Waterloo; Soldier’s Story: William Wharton - Waterloo 200.

Watton Barracks in Brecon was built by government contract in 1805 to house the town Armoury. It was converted into accommodation for 270 men a few years later; and yes as you say the building is now the Regimental Museumof the Royal Welsh (Brecon). The Brecknock County Militia were stationed there in those days: history fact sheet pdf.

Every conflict from the early 18th century; 'Blatant lack of respect for the history"; Brecon barracks closing after 220 years. After so much history the old cavalry and infantry barracks will be a big loss, to some people it's only bricks and mortar, and bean counting. Hopefully Dering Lines will survive yet another MOD sell off.
well said Jack!
 

Goatman

ADC
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Out of all the Soviet males born in 1923, an estimated 80 percent didn’t survive the war.

https://www.ushmm.org/wlc/en/article.php?ModuleId=10007183

' By February 1942, 2,000,000 of the 3,300,000 Soviet soldiers in German custody up to that point had died from starvation, exposure, disease, or shooting. '
 
Indeed-Slim was no supporter of Wingate: however, Wavell was a believer and Wingate was protected by his later patronage.

I suspect that Wingate, if medically assessed now, would probably be regarded as borderline autistic/bi-polar: he consumed large amounts of raw onions as he believed that such were the cornerstone of a healthy diet. In the field, he had the habit of receiving visitors to his tent whilst naked. It was something of a surprise to learn that he was allowed to continue serving as a failed suicide!

An odd fish indeed.
I'm trawling through one of those "Forgotten Voices" books at the moment, this one about The Forgotten Army, the 14th in Burma.
Wingate is not really spoken of with much affection or respect by many of those under him. The vast majority seem very critical of his leadership skills & tactics once they deployed.
This is not to denigrate the Chindits, the idea was a sound one and they aquitted themselves well but Wingate's methods & decisions are often the subject of criticism.
It seems he was not well liked by many of his subalterns.
 
Out of all the Soviet males born in 1923, an estimated 80 percent didn’t survive the war.

The Treatment of Soviet POWs: Starvation, Disease, and Shootings, June 1941–January 1942

' By February 1942, 2,000,000 of the 3,300,000 Soviet soldiers in German custody up to that point had died from starvation, exposure, disease, or shooting. '
I'm only surprised that the survival rate was so high. I read somewhere that the wartime survival rate for Soviet males born in 1924 was 1%. This figure has stuck in my head because both of my maternal grandparents were born in August 1924. My grandmother was one of Lord Haw Haw's "Aycliffe Angels". My grandfather was an engine fireman on the railways and therefore in a reserved occupation.
 

Auld-Yin

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I'm trawling through one of those "Forgotten Voices" books at the moment, this one about The Forgotten Army, the 14th in Burma.
Wingate is not really spoken of with much affection or respect by many of those under him. The vast majority seem very critical of his leadership skills & tactics once they deployed.
This is not to denigrate the Chindits, the idea was a sound one and they aquitted themselves well but Wingate's methods & decisions are often the subject of criticism.
It seems he was not well liked by many of his subalterns.
Well, he was mad as a box of frogs!
 
I'm only surprised that the survival rate was so high. I read somewhere that the wartime survival rate for Soviet males born in 1924 was 1%. This figure has stuck in my head because both of my maternal grandparents were born in August 1924. My grandmother was one of Lord Haw Haw's "Aycliffe Angels". My grandfather was an engine fireman on the railways and therefore in a reserved occupation.
Had to look up "Aycliffe Angels" and were taken to the web site which said "Few official records of these accidents exist, perhaps because of the secrecy surrounding the plant, which was infiltrated by several German spies during the War." I was under the impression that there was minimal German spies in the UK as the counter spying by Uk intelligence was excellent. There may have been lots of Soviet spies but no German ones.
 
Had to look up "Aycliffe Angels" and were taken to the web site which said "Few official records of these accidents exist, perhaps because of the secrecy surrounding the plant, which was infiltrated by several German spies during the War." I was under the impression that there was minimal German spies in the UK as the counter spying by Uk intelligence was excellent. There may have been lots of Soviet spies but no German ones.
I've just had a quick Google of the term and one of the articles mentions that there was no official recognition of the workers there. However my nanna told me that she actually got a medal for the work that she did there. As granda's brother picked up a MM and bar the family knew a bit about medals so presumably this was a commemorative medal as opposed to the BEM that one of the women who worked there got for only missing two shifts in two years.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Out of all the Soviet males born in 1923, an estimated 80 percent didn’t survive the war.

The Treatment of Soviet POWs: Starvation, Disease, and Shootings, June 1941–January 1942

' By February 1942, 2,000,000 of the 3,300,000 Soviet soldiers in German custody up to that point had died from starvation, exposure, disease, or shooting. '
Not supporting the Box treatment of their Slavic POWs by any means, but the Sovs themselves managed to slaughter greater numbers of their own.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
The battling monks of the Shaolin temple in China,home of kung fu,were so hard core that in 1928 a local warlord (Shi Yousan) kicked them all out and set fire to their monastery. It burned for a biblical 40 days.
 
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The first UK Navy Nuc sub , on its first trip to Singapore, The Officer in charge of resupply did not demand enough toilet paper, so all were reduced to one sheet a day. "Please use both sides".

On surfacing in Mauritius, to resupply the bog roll, the Officer in charge of the electrics had to find somewhere to "clean" the C2O scrubbers for the oxygen and air supply when under the surface.

Needed 1000 plus degrees to clean them. Went to the local crematorium.
 
The first UK Navy Nuc sub , on its first trip to Singapore, The Officer in charge of resupply did not demand enough toilet paper, so all were reduced to one sheet a day. "Please use both sides".
Who was worst in the sh!t after that one?

Answers on a postcard C/O a PO Box in Mauritius, I think.
 
The first UK Navy Nuc sub , on its first trip to Singapore, The Officer in charge of resupply did not demand enough toilet paper, so all were reduced to one sheet a day. "Please use both sides".

On surfacing in Mauritius, to resupply the bog roll, the Officer in charge of the electrics had to find somewhere to "clean" the C2O scrubbers for the oxygen and air supply when under the surface.

Needed 1000 plus degrees to clean them. Went to the local crematorium.
Bluddy 'ell, it'll have been Izal bog roll as well. That stuff only smeared the sh!t about yer ring. Wouldn't have liked to have been their dhobi.
 
On the same subject UK Navy subs....

Used to visit Murmansk the Russian sub port.

One time the UK sub hit a Russian sub as it tried to “ lift up a bit” sorry do not know the nautical term.

On return to Faslane, report was ...

On trying to surface under an Artic ice flow , coning tower was damaged.

Civil engineer on his report wrote...

“First time I have ever seen anti fouling paint on an ice flow”.

From the BBC , The Reunion radio programme Radio 4.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
At the end of the 19th Century, Birmingham Corporation started building a series of dams in the Elan Valley, near Rhayader. First thing they did was build a small dam at Nant y Gro to provide drinking water for the workers' village. Once the main dams were built, Nant y Gro became redundant.

In 1942, Barnes Wallace needed a proper dam to prove the theory of Upkeep. Nant y Gro got the good news on 1 May 1942. The rest is history.

Bomb Testing at Nant-y-Gro Dam | The Dambusters

The remnants of the Nant y Gro dam have remained as they were left in 1942. Today Zero Alpha and I once again walked around Caban Coch reservoir from the Elan visitors' centre to Nant y Gro. Just because we could.
 
At the end of the 19th Century, Birmingham Corporation started building a series of dams in the Elan Valley, near Rhayader. First thing they did was build a small dam at Nant y Gro to provide drinking water for the workers' village. Once the main dams were built, Nant y Gro became redundant.

In 1942, Barnes Wallace needed a proper dam to prove the theory of Upkeep. Nant y Gro got the good news on 1 May 1942. The rest is history.

Bomb Testing at Nant-y-Gro Dam | The Dambusters

The remnants of the Nant y Gro dam have remained as they were left in 1942. Today Zero Alpha and I once again walked around Caban Coch reservoir from the Elan visitors' centre to Nant y Gro. Just because we could.

A few years back ( around 30 I think) I was working on a job at the British Board of Agrement
they had been clearing the overgrown garden area around a river, and found a replica of a dam ?
one of the old guys working there recalled that as a kid his dad brought him over and showed him the dam being built
it ws used for testing by Barnes Wallis and features in the Dambusters film
the BBA is over near Watford

Replica of the Mohne Dam, in the grounds of the Building Research Establishment, Garston, St. Stephen - 1020749| Historic England
 
A
A few years back ( around 30 I think) I was working on a job at the British Board of Agrement
they had been clearing the overgrown garden area around a river, and found a replica of a dam ?
one of the old guys working there recalled that as a kid his dad brought him over and showed him the dam being built
it ws used for testing by Barnes Wallis and features in the Dambusters film
the BBA is over near Watford

Replica of the Mohne Dam, in the grounds of the Building Research Establishment, Garston, St. Stephen - 1020749| Historic England
An 'informative' is not sufficient for that link. Fascinating. I didn't know it was built 3 years prior to the raid
 
A
An 'informative' is not sufficient for that link. Fascinating. I didn't know it was built 3 years prior to the raid
when they first cleared it, no one knew of its relevance or why it was built their
one of the retired guys was asked and he showed them photos of himself working on it alongside other youngsters
I think the place used to be MIRA before that, and before that it was a working RAF airfield, they said bits of a Wellington are still visible in one fo the older trees
probably long gone now
the dam was between some wooden cabins they used for a canteen
it was quite something to see history like that
 
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AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
A
An 'informative' is not sufficient for that link. Fascinating. I didn't know it was built 3 years prior to the raid
I seem to recall something that the film couldn't capture was that Wallace had planned to destroy dams as far back as the end of the Great War.
 

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