Something From History You Probably Never Knew...

In several books and even History Today, is the unlikely theory that the "real reason Elizabeth didn't marry was because she was male". The ‘Bisley Boy’ myth claims the real Elizabeth died as a young girl and was replaced by a redheaded child.

Thomas Keble the Victorian vicar of Bisley told the stories and so did Bisley village. Bram Stoker promulgated the myth in his "Famous Imposters" of 1910 (good luck with that drivel). Supposedly in 1542, Henry VIII went on a hunt at Berkeley, leaving Elizabeth, 9, at Over Court House in Glos, then a Bisley royal hunting lodge away from the London plague. But she is supposed to have died and her minders replaced her with a boy who must have spent the rest of his life cross-dressing. The Over Court family claimed the story was true, and there's a myth of Elizabeth's little garden around what legend says was her stone coffin. Fortunately for the myth makers there was no post mortem on Elizabeth I.

The Anglo-Zanzibar War of 1896 could well be the shortest war in history, lasting less than 40 minutes. After Britain declared Zanzibar a protectorate of the British Empire and installed a puppet Sultan: an impostor called Khalid bin Barghash probably had the Sultan poisoned in late August 1896 and nicked his job. Khalid resisted calls to stand down so the British threatened to destroy his Palace, which he'd secured with a useless force of 3,000 duffers, obsolete artillery and a yacht in the nearby harbour. After several threats and ultimatums: one morning from 9 AM East Africa time - British ships blew the shit out of Khalid's palace and he quickly buggered off. On 28 August 1896, the Yorkshire Evening Post reported the events in Zanzibar. The Anglo-Zanzibar War.
 
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In several books and even History Today, is the unlikely theory that the "real reason Elizabeth didn't marry was because she was male". The ‘Bisley Boy’ myth claims the real Elizabeth died as a young girl and was replaced by a redheaded child.

Thomas Keble the Victorian vicar of Bisley told the stories and so did Bisley village. Bram Stoker promulgated the myth in his "Famous Imposters" of 1910 (good luck with that drivel). Supposedly in 1542, Henry VIII went on a hunt at Berkeley, leaving Elizabeth, 9, at Over Court House in Glos, then a Bisley royal hunting lodge away from the London plague. But she is supposed to have died and her minders replaced her with a boy who must have spent the rest of his life cross-dressing. The Over Court family claimed the story was true, and there's a myth of Elizabeth's little garden around what legend says was her stone coffin. Fortunately for the myth makers there was no post mortem.
Unless I’ve missed something, why not replace her with another female round about the same age and build?
 
Unless I’ve missed something, why not replace her with another female round about the same age and build?
Unless I’ve missed something, why not replace her with another female round about the same age and build?
You and your sensible questions at 2213 hrs on a Saturday night. Be off with you
 
Unless I’ve missed something, why not replace her with another female round about the same age and build?
Good question. AIUI from the stories, her governess couldn't find a replacement girl in time before Henry rolled up at Over Court.
 
In several books and even History Today, is the unlikely theory that the "real reason Elizabeth didn't marry was because she was male". The ‘Bisley Boy’ myth claims the real Elizabeth died as a young girl and was replaced by a redheaded child.

Thomas Keble the Victorian vicar of Bisley told the stories and so did Bisley village. Bram Stoker promulgated the myth in his "Famous Imposters" of 1910 (good luck with that drivel). Supposedly in 1542, Henry VIII went on a hunt at Berkeley, leaving Elizabeth, 9, at Over Court House in Glos, then a Bisley royal hunting lodge away from the London plague. But she is supposed to have died and her minders replaced her with a boy who must have spent the rest of his life cross-dressing. The Over Court family claimed the story was true, and there's a myth of Elizabeth's little garden around what legend says was her stone coffin. Fortunately for the myth makers there was no post mortem on Elizabeth I.

The Anglo-Zanzibar War of 1896 could well be the shortest war in history, lasting less than 40 minutes. After Britain declared Zanzibar a protectorate of the British Empire and installed a puppet Sultan: an impostor called Khalid bin Barghash probably had the Sultan poisoned in late August 1896 and nicked his job. Khalid resisted calls to stand down so the British threatened to destroy his Palace, which he'd secured with a useless force of 3,000 duffers, obsolete artillery and a yacht in the nearby harbour. After several threats and ultimatums: one morning from 9 AM East Africa time - British ships blew the shit out of Khalid's palace and he quickly buggered off. On 28 August 1896, the Yorkshire Evening Post reported the events in Zanzibar. The Anglo-Zanzibar War.
Didn’t when rub salt into the wound and also charge them for our spent ammunition
 
Didn’t when rub salt into the wound and also charge them for our spent ammunition
I had to dig for that and there's a reference in Shaw's "The Mammoth Book of Losers". "The enemy had to pay for 500 shells and 5,000 rounds [of MG ammo] fired on their country". Dr. Benyan Saud Turki in 2010 mentioned other penalties and compensation benefiting the British peoples, and that several of Khalid's 'notables' were thrown out of Zanzibar.

Five hundred Zanzibaris were killed for one British matelot injured; the Arab Khalid and a few supporters fled to the German consulate for asylum. Frankl, 2006: Khalid was captured [in the British East African campaign] during the First World War and went free in Mombasa [or Dar El Salam forty-five miles away] as long as he had no further designs on the Sultanate. This all happened during the stand-offs and resentment between Britain and Germany. A folk hero to some in Zanzibar, Khalid joined the Germans against the British in 1914, and was exiled to Saint Helena Island till 1921. He finally pegged it in 1927.

After the Anglo-Zanzibar short war,
The British Administration also imposed a collective penalty on the rest of Zanzibar’s influential figures, amounting to 500.000 rupees. Then this amount was reduced to 250.000 rupees to be paid before their release, which forced the senior figures to buy their liberty with money. Those who were not able to settle the amount, mostly poor Swahilis and Comorians, were forced to leave Zanzibar. The material penalty was a punishment to dissuade everyone from engaging in such an action or even thinking about it
https://revistas.ucm.es/index.php/ANQE/article/viewFile/ANQE1010110035A/3521.
 

Helm

MIA
Book Reviewer
I had to dig for that and there's a reference in Shaw's "The Mammoth Book of Losers". "The enemy had to pay for 500 shells and 5,000 rounds [of MG ammo] fired on their country". Dr. Benyan Saud Turki in 2010 mentioned other penalties and compensation benefiting the British peoples, and that several of Khalid's 'notables' were thrown out of Zanzibar.

Five hundred Zanzibaris were killed for one British matelot injured; the Arab Khalid and a few supporters fled to the German consulate for asylum. Frankl, 2006: Khalid was captured [in the British East African campaign] during the First World War and went free in Mombasa [or Dar El Salam forty-five miles away] as long as he had no further designs on the Sultanate. This all happened during the stand-offs and resentment between Britain and Germany. A folk hero to some in Zanzibar, Khalid joined the Germans against the British in 1914, and was exiled to Saint Helena Island till 1921. He finally pegged it in 1927.

After the Anglo-Zanzibar short war, https://revistas.ucm.es/index.php/ANQE/article/viewFile/ANQE1010110035A/3521.
Ahem
The British-Zanzibar War, the shortest war in history. So I decided to google this so-called war to find out more about it. What I found was an intriguing journal entry written by the incredibly mysterious Sultan of Zanzibar. What follows is a series of fateful entries written on the day of the war.

August 22, 6am
Dearest Journal, today I have been appointed the SULTAN of ZANZIBAR! How sweet is that? Of course, given the circumstances of my appointment, I must take this job with merely a grin instead of a full-blown crescent moon smile. My father, the long-time Sultan Tad Storkensburg, died last night of irritable bowel syndrome. I think there was something in his Zanzibarian Burger that really disagreed with him. Alas, I mourn my father's gruesome and disgusting death, and I welcome my new title of Sultan! It's so much cooler than "Saltine."
My first act as Sultan is to stand up to those awful Brits. The Brits and the Germans have been fighting over my island for years now, and I'm damn sick and tired of it. The Brits keep wanting this island so they can move into Africa, the Germans want this island so they can put a Volkswagon factory on it. Zanzibar is my homeland, as obscure and ridiculous as that sounds, and I will not let it slip into the hands of the straightbacks from the north! So, after speaking with Germany, they've decided to back me up as I stand up to the Brits. My dad had good relations with those limey bastards for years, but now that he's out of the way I'm gonna kick some ass!
August 22, 1896 9am
Dearest journal, I just declared war on the Brits. I know what you're thinking... I'm in office for three hours and I already declared war on the biggest nation in the world. Maybe I was a little hasty, but I stand by my decision. I declared war about twenty minutes ago, and I'm ready for whatever they are going to throw at me! I have 2,500 Arab troops ready and willing to be slaughtered for the well-being of Zanzibar. I also have this really boss gold cannon from 1658. Back in the day, I hear, we used to use this cannon for everything... we even fought off the Egyptians or something. But ever since then it's been sitting in front of the Zanzibarian Court House just collecting dust. I also got this sweet old ship... it's like a wooden viking boat. Only it's not a viking boat because vikings didn't come down here... often.
August 22, 1896 9:05am
Dear J-Dog, The British are pretty much surrounding the island with their large-ass ships. Any normal Sultan would be thinking he had made a mistake, but I know I'm doing the right thing. I will be the Sultan to end all Sultans! Let it be known that Reggie Storkensburg, The Sultan of Zanzibar, was the most courageous leader ever. With the exception of Jesus. Anyways, right now we are sort of waiting... my troops are just sitting on the beaches playing card games and volleyball and the British keep cocking their rifles at us. I hope something happens pretty soon, I have a tennis date with the Czar of Uberbeckingstand at noon. Did I spell his country right? Oh well, no one's gonna read this anyways.
August 22, 1896 9:15am
Shit! Snap! Dag! Holy flaming crap! The Brits have decided to start shooting cannon balls at my island! One shot took out 500 of my troops, who were in the middle of a round robin volleyball tournament on the north shore! I have decided to bring out my golden cannon, which I have named "Fat Man." I have three cannon balls, which I have named "Little Boy." Those Brits are going to have some trouble coming there way as soon as Fat Man shoots the Little Boys!
August 22, 1896 9:25am
This isn't going at all like I had planned.
August 22, 1896 9:35am
Okay, okay, okay, all of my troops are dead. That's what I get for hiring all these Arabs to do the job... everyone knows Arabs can't swim! My viking ship has been totally destroyed, even worse they spray painted a giant cock and balls on the side of it before they set it on fire. Those British sure do know how to make you feel stupid. Although I must stay that they aren't nearly as polite as everyone thinks. Let's just hope my cannon holds out!
August 22, 1896 9:37am
Murphy's Law kicked in... my uber-boss cannon just burst into flames! It's made of gold, how did this happen?!
August 22, 1896 9:45am
Dear Journal, you are now looking at the former Sultan of Zanzibar... that's right. I gave up. I couldn't take it anymore! The Brits had me backed up against the wall here. And so after 45 minutes of being pummeled by these jerks, I gave up. I kinda forgot that my population consisted of just 2,500 Arabs, and since they were all dead now... I figured I might as well cut my losses and live to rule another day. Luckily, my sausage-welding friends from Middle Europe, let me stay at their consulate. Those Germans are alright, ya know? I mean, they really know what they are doing, and I wouldn't be surprised if they really make a difference in the world. I'd stake my Sultan reputation on it.
Anyways, goodbye my lovely journal... the Germans won't allow me to bring this into the consulate, so I must leave it on this board and float it out to sea. Maybe someday those Brits will find it and see all of the stuff I said about em. Won't they feel bad!
 
24th (Second Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot was not overly populated with Welshmen, at the time of Isandhlwana/Rorke's Drift, which preceded by several years, the Cardwell reforms that shoehorned the regiment (against the wishes of many Warwickshire folk) into a Welsh identity.

It is instructive, for example, to research the birthplaces of the regiment's Rorkes Drift VC winners.

The family of a pre-Cardwell/pre-Zulu War VC recipient from the 24th have lodged his medal with the RRF in Birmingham in order to preserve it from capture by the Welsh latecomers.
Yes, I know, but Stanley Baker was Welsh and he raised the money for the film, so it's now common knowledge that the Zulus were defeated by the massed male voice choirs of South Wales.

People bitch about Hollywood distorting history.
 
Brecon Barracks
The Depot 24th in August 1879, the background hasn't changed one bit since the image was taken. Seen here recruits being trained to be drafted to South Africa to replace casualties of the 1st and 2nd Bns
brecon barracks.jpg
.
 
Yes, I know, but Stanley Baker was Welsh and he raised the money for the film, so it's now common knowledge that the Zulus were defeated by the massed male voice choirs of South Wales.

People bitch about Hollywood distorting history.
Onetap Greetings. I can't quite remember the number of 'Davies's that were killed at Isandlwana, but it was inordinately high, also other Welsh surnames. I tell you this because I know you will come back before midnight with your own list.
 
Brecon Barracks
The Depot 24th in August 1879, the background hasn't changed one bit since the image was taken. Seen here recruits being trained to be drafted to South Africa to replace casualties of the 1st and 2nd Bns View attachment 322834 .
The building to the left is the Royal Welsh museum, to the right of that and slightly set back is the location of the last Welsh troops to use the barracks. My TAC!
 
In several books and even History Today, is the unlikely theory that the "real reason Elizabeth didn't marry was because she was male". The ‘Bisley Boy’ myth claims the real Elizabeth died as a young girl and was replaced by a redheaded child.

Thomas Keble the Victorian vicar of Bisley told the stories and so did Bisley village. Bram Stoker promulgated the myth in his "Famous Imposters" of 1910 (good luck with that drivel). Supposedly in 1542, Henry VIII went on a hunt at Berkeley, leaving Elizabeth, 9, at Over Court House in Glos, then a Bisley royal hunting lodge away from the London plague. But she is supposed to have died and her minders replaced her with a boy who must have spent the rest of his life cross-dressing. The Over Court family claimed the story was true, and there's a myth of Elizabeth's little garden around what legend says was her stone coffin. Fortunately for the myth makers there was no post mortem on Elizabeth I.
I'm not sure why I'm bothering with such obvious twaddle but a) Henry couldn't recognise his own daughter???? nor his son and elder daughter, their sister. Mary in particular would have had good reason to denounce her, removing a Protestant from the succession b) the Queen of England spent her whole life surrounded by servants, many of whom would have bathed her or been similarly physically familiar. Yet the story went underground for nearly 300 years.
 
I'm not sure why I'm bothering with such obvious twaddle but a) Henry couldn't recognise his own daughter???? nor his son and elder daughter, their sister. Mary in particular would have had good reason to denounce her, removing a Protestant from the succession b) the Queen of England spent her whole life surrounded by servants, many of whom would have bathed her or been similarly physically familiar. Yet the story went underground for nearly 300 years.
Same reasoning that 9/11 was a CIA plot: it's complete bollox.
 
I'm not sure why I'm bothering with such obvious twaddle but a) Henry couldn't recognise his own daughter???? nor his son and elder daughter, their sister. Mary in particular would have had good reason to denounce her, removing a Protestant from the succession b) the Queen of England spent her whole life surrounded by servants, many of whom would have bathed her or been similarly physically familiar. Yet the story went underground for nearly 300 years.
Well done. ..."the unlikely theory"; "stories" and "claims", of course it's twaddle. If a legend is a traditional story sometimes popularly regarded as historical but not authenticated, I really shouldn't take it so seriously if I were you.
 
I understand that Brecon Bks is to close in 2027. The Infantry Battle School might survive but that's still a big loss of over 200 years history. You can have a look at the Brecon Museum on Youtube and there's a downloadable WWI book at WW1 Book (Contents).
Closing? Sad when you think soldiers left there for Waterloo, Crimea, Zulu wars, South Africa. WW1 WW2 Korea and on and on. In Georgian times the Museum was the original Militia Barracks, the main barracks the Keep etc were built in the early 1870s
 
Closing? Sad when you think soldiers left there for Waterloo, Crimea, Zulu wars, South Africa. WW1 WW2 Korea and on and on. In Georgian times the Museum was the original Militia Barracks, the main barracks the Keep etc were built in the early 1870s
Captain William Wharton’s story is told on Waterloo 200, he fought with 73rd Regiment in the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo in 1815, and was severely wounded at Waterloo; Soldier’s Story: William Wharton - Waterloo 200.

Watton Barracks in Brecon was built by government contract in 1805 to house the town Armoury. It was converted into accommodation for 270 men a few years later; and yes as you say the building is now the Regimental Museum of the Royal Welsh (Brecon). The Brecknock County Militia were stationed there in those days: history fact sheet pdf.

Every conflict from the early 18th century; 'Blatant lack of respect for the history"; Brecon barracks closing after 220 years. After so much history the old cavalry and infantry barracks will be a big loss, to some people it's only bricks and mortar, and bean counting. Hopefully Dering Lines will survive yet another MOD sell off.
 

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