Soldiers who served in multiple wars

I vaguely remember an Argyll QM Lt Colonel at IDB in 1982 he served in WW2 and Korea and I think 4 GSM campaigns (Borneo, Radfan, South Arabia, Northern Ireland) will see If I can get a photo.
Sadly, I don't have remember his all ribbons but there were a fcecking lot of them and I think he had three on his GSM. He was a very quiet spoken, thoughtful man, with an aura of "kin 'ell" around him. We were in awe of him during basic.
 

oldnotbold

War Hero
I don't know how many wars Pte Nobby Esplin of 1st Royal West Kents fought in, but when they returned to the UK from India in early 1938 he had spent the previous 34 years overseas with various bits of the regiment.
 
I know Hoare did not rate the Irish troops, think he wrote something about it in ' Congo mercenary'. Maybe he was wrong as Jadotville seemed to be a defining moment for them. Pure interest for me, i know the Congo operation gave the Irish Defence Forces a much needed lift in morale and self belief. Perhaps @irlsgt knows a bit more on this?
Can't speak for independence but reading "Into Action" by Col Dan Harvey at the minute. It's covered.

It was part of a multinational Bde sized action and was 1 of 2 planned Bn in Attacks. The mission was to seize and hold the Tunnel as far as I can see they did so. It was a hard battle but from a quick skim through the mission was achieved
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
Funny that in Congo the un took sides and the Irish army fought often unprepared by their own leadership. Congo is the reason the UN in general and the Irish in particular won't take sides. Korea its said was the first and last successful active war that the in took sides in. Success is a disputable claim depending upon your measure
 
The service of the Irish Army in the Congo was a triumph of optimism over experience; no combat experience at all in the entire Army, an institutional wilful refusal to listen to experienced soldiers who had served in WW 2 and Korea, grossly inadequate equipment and training and the perennial Department of Finance opposition to paying for better kit. The first few airlifts that went out wore bullswool uniforms, garrison caps, no helmets, no tropical clothing (despite being warned about it by Catholic missionaries and clergy about the need for it), .303 rifles, too few soft skinned vehicles, grossly inadequate Ford "armoured" cars, no artillery, no antiaircraft weapons, and a host of other deficiencies. The USAF men who airlifted them out laughed in sad amazement at the kit of the troops as they boarded the aircraft. At least the Indians and Ethiopians who were out there had combat under their belts.....my uncle served on one rotation.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
When we rely upon the internet for an insight into these times we should remember that the majority of articles in English will have been written by the Irish contingent themselves and be therefore more likely to show themselves in a better light than say the (often) now dead protagonists on the "rebel" side. Who is to tell their tale and who would believe it if told?
 
The service of the Irish Army in the Congo was a triumph of optimism over experience; no combat experience at all in the entire Army, an institutional wilful refusal to listen to experienced soldiers who had served in WW 2 and Korea, grossly inadequate equipment and training and the perennial Department of Finance opposition to paying for better kit. The first few airlifts that went out wore bullswool uniforms, garrison caps, no helmets, no tropical clothing (despite being warned about it by Catholic missionaries and clergy about the need for it), .303 rifles, too few soft skinned vehicles, grossly inadequate Ford "armoured" cars, no artillery, no antiaircraft weapons, and a host of other deficiencies. The USAF men who airlifted them out laughed in sad amazement at the kit of the troops as they boarded the aircraft. At least the Indians and Ethiopians who were out there had combat under their belts.....my uncle served on one rotation.
As I've pointed out before, wool comes from sheep not bulls mate :)
 
I
Cut & pasted, these all good for a triple ?

Malayan Emergency 1948–1960
Korean War 1950–1953
Mau Mau Uprising 1952–1960
Cypriot Independence 1955–1959
Suez Crisis 1956–1957
Brunei Revolt 1962–1966
Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation 1962-1966
Dhofar Rebellion 1962–1975
Aden Emergency 1963
Operation Banner 1969–2007
Falklands War 1982
Gulf War 1990–1991
Yugoslav wars 1991–2001
Bosnian War 1992–1995
Kosovo War 1998–1999
I have 3 off this list then Iraq and Afghanistan.
 
One Robin Rencher served in Vietnam, Northern Ireland & the Falklands:



I wonder how many other former Vietnam war veterans from the Australian & NZ army found their ways into the British Army?
 
They started it !

And i said WW1 @dingerr , didn't put ww2 as he was not scraping in that . So he could be included in that or not depending on your view on the original question.
We could have done a deal ....
There was no need for violence , particularly as we hadn't finished off paying for the last one .
 
I have just finished reading the WW1 memoirs of CP Blacker , called " Have you forgotten yet ? " . He served as an infantry subaltern with both 4CG & 2CG in WW1 and was then the RMO of 2CG in WW2 .
A very good read .
 

smeg-head

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Cut & pasted, these all good for a triple ?

Malayan Emergency 1948–1960
Korean War 1950–1953
Mau Mau Uprising 1952–1960
Cypriot Independence 1955–1959
Suez Crisis 1956–1957
Brunei Revolt 1962–1966
Indonesia–Malaysia confrontation 1962-1966
Dhofar Rebellion 1962–1975
Aden Emergency 1963
Operation Banner 1969–2007
Falklands War 1982
Gulf War 1990–1991
Yugoslav wars 1991–2001
Bosnian War 1992–1995
Kosovo War 1998–1999
I can manage four of those plus CMF Rhodesia & UN Cyprus! Those were the days when scalies were needed.
 
I remember several guys in my old regiment (KOSB) who had served operationally always with the regiment pre WW2 on India's (now Pakistan) North West Frontier, WW2, Palestine, Korea, Malaya, Aden, Borneo. And more than a few WW2, Palestine, Korea, Malaya, Aden, Borneo, NI. I recall one Commanding Officer, mentioned in Lord Lovat's book, another DSO., MC. and a RSM MBE.,DCM., and a couple of MiDs (mentioned in Speakman VCs biography) - mind you I joined in the early 1960s. Wonderful guys, rows of ribbons - not a Coronation medal between them!
 
Ok these are airmen and American to boot.

General Robin Olds WW2 and Vietnam.

Robin Olds - Wikipedia

General Daniel 'Chappie' James WW2 Korea and Vietnem, first African American to reach 4 star rank.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_James_Jr.
They were good friends and colleagues, sometimes known as " Blackman and Robin " :D

One of their tours together was when Olds had the 8th Tactical Fighter Wing in Thailand/Vietnam and James was his deputy commander for operations.

Edited to add - a USAF operational wing had four full colonels at its head- the commander, vice-commander , deputy commander for operations ( DO), and deputy commander for maintenance ( DM). The 8th TFW's vice-commander under Olds was Vermont Garrison, who had been an ace in both WW2 and Korea:

Vermont Garrison - Wikipedia
 
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I did a search and there is no mention of William Manley RA, RAMC.

He was a doctor and “fought” in:
  • Crimean War
  • Maori War
  • Franco-Prussian War
  • Afghan War
  • Anglo-Egyptian War.
Awarded the VC and the Iron Cross.

Manley by name, manly by nature. Nominative determinism at its best.
 

Poppycock

Clanker
Billy is an old chum and an amazing bloke. He was and is the stuff of legend in the SF community. He was a Sgt Maj.in MACV SOG. Besides his own book, Hunting the Jackal he figures a lot in John Plasters book SOG. Him and Cliff Newman, Jim Hetrick, Jim Bath, Melvin Hill and others were doing HALO insertions onto the Ho Chi Minh trail back in the day. He subsequently had an equally amazing career with the CIA.
Billy has also written a book about Isaac Camacho, an SF Sgt who was captured by the VC when his A Camp was overrun. He spent 21 months in a cage and chained to tree before escaping and making his way back to a friendly camp. If you can find it it's well worth a read.
Billy is still working, among other things lecturing SF young officers at Fort Bragg.
Does he ever talk about his time in Yemen training al Qaeda? That'd be a very interesting conversation I'd bet

Do you know anything about that (any more that he published in 'Hunting the Jackal' that is)?
 

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