Soldiers race against political clock in Afghanistan

Discussion in 'Current Affairs, News and Analysis' started by Skynet, Jun 19, 2010.

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  1. Soldiers race against political clock in Afghanistan

    By Mark Urban
    BBC News

    As the US military dramatically increases its numbers in Afghanistan there are real fears among British and US soldiers that they may have been given an impossible mission.

    Coalition forces face a challenge to keep up with Obama's timetable
    Our conversation had gone on amiably enough. The colonel and I sitting in a London cafe discussing current Nato operations in Afghanistan.
    More
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/from_our_own_correspondent/8748027.stm?
     
  2. The politicians are now very much looking for a 'well at least try and create a facade of a functioning un-corrupt government and thousands of trained ANA and ANP who don't smoke sh*t loads of dope and desert en masse, and lets get out'. Obviously the military forces on the ground want to complete a mission but I think the politicians are doing, maybe not the right thing but the thing to stop more bloodshed which is increasingly being seen as unnecessary by the masses.
     
  3. Obama is an idiot, giving the Taliban his timetable for withdrawal has just handed them the game, all the Taliban have to do is sit tight, playing the "innocent" peasant farmer until all foreign troops withdraw! Then just remobilise their supporters, recover all their weapons, and take over and reimpose their vicious archaic regime! :x
    What a total waste of billions of $ and more importantly, hundreds of our troops lives! :x
     
  4. seaweed

    seaweed LE Book Reviewer

    I think there is another nastier factor waiting to come into play, namely that while we may be looking for an agreed handover and a graceful withdrawal, others may wish to make it look more as if we were forced out by their causing max casualties once we are committed to withdrawal. The dissident party can then claim it was their valour that forced out the evil infidel feringhees. It certainly looked like that to me when we announced our withdrawal from Aden.

    One can only withdraw in good order from a conflict when the enemy has been visibly beaten to a sticky pulp.

    However the Great Obama has spoken, and so it shall be.
     
  5. Doesnt fresh prince parallel Obamas entry into the whitehouse, anyhow my dad was at Aden and the look of shame on his face when it comes up about the Brits withdrawing. Hope the same does not happen in the Stan, but I fear it will.

    Being push feely is not working.
     
  6. Mark Urban has sketched out nicely what we already know about the political military disconnection over strategy. Mr Obama's love of oratory, or perhaps merely the sound of his own voice damaged the military campaign from the first months of his presidency.

    His remarks over Israel opened the way for the propaganda campaign culminating in the "Aid Convoy" incident.

    He is currently engaged in a verbal assault on the oil company BP, which is likely to do more damage to your pension fund than Mr Brown's cash grab in year one of the "Third Way".

    During his election campaign the media heaped paeons of praise upon him for his statesman-like language. Perhaps he should have been told that sometimes less is more?

    B
     
  7. I simply don't see how we can get out in the BP hater's timeline. If we go early and security situation is bad, Karzai willsuffer the same fate as Najibullah.

    1996: Dr. Mohammad Najibullah


    On this date, Sep 27 in 1996, the man who once ruled ruled Afghanistan under the aegis of a superpower succumbed to the tender mercies of his country’s fundamentalist insurgency.
    Mohammad Najibullah was the last president of the Soviet-backed Democratic Republic of Afghanistan. Unfortunately for Najibullah, he was on the job when Moscow decided to throw in the towel on the Soviet-Afghan War.
    Photos,
    http://www.executedtoday.com/2009/09/27/1996-dr-mohammad-najibullah/

    After losing the subsequent civil war, the former President was trapped for a nervous few years in Kabul — blocked from joining his family in flight to India by the offices of former Soviet client and present-day American client Abdul Rashid Dostum.
    When Kabul finally surrendered to the Taliban in 1996, the hated onetime Communist viceroy — whose stepping-stone to that post was heading the hated Afghan secret police — had a problem.
    At the instigation of future Taliban second-in-command Mohammad Rabbani, Najibullah and his brother were hauled out of the U.N. compound where they had taken refuge, publicly beaten, tortured and castrated, and strung up on a traffic barricade.
    There was a new sheriff in town.