Soldiers not eligible .......

#1
A BBC report has claimed that soldiers who have served this country are not eligible to remain here once they leave and could face deportation because they haven't served for 4 years or more.

(Sorry. No link).
 
#3
Well as 4 years is the minimun you can sign on then I see nothing too awry with this. It prevents people enlisting and jacking prematurely in order to get a passport.

The caveat to this should be anyone unable to continue service due to injuries etc especially on ops should be granted dispensation from this 4 year limit.

We get some very good lads and lasses in from the commonwealth etc, imagine however what would happen if passports or residency was granted to anyone irrespective of time served.
 
#4
The_Cad said:
Well as 4 years is the minimun you can sign on then I see nothing too awry with this. It prevents people enlisting and jacking prematurely in order to get a passport.

The caveat to this should be anyone unable to continue service due to injuries etc especially on ops should be granted dispensation from this 4 year limit.
We get some very good lads and lasses in from the commonwealth etc, imagine however what would happen if passports or residency was granted to anyone irrespective of time served.
My bold. If the Beeb is to be believed (Breakfast this Morning) this caveat already exists fortunately.

Heed.
 
#6
SO3Paperclips said:
The devil is in the detail..

Time served in Iraq, Afghanistan or Germany does not count..
Forgive me if I misunderstand the situation, we spend several million a year on ethnic minority recruitment yet if a commonwealth soldier loses a leg or worse in AFG etc and is medically dischrged then they face deportation if they are under the 4 years?

Tell me this is a wind up?
 

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
#7
Here it is


Some Commonwealth soldiers in the British Army, injured and medically discharged from the service, face deportation, the BBC has learned.

Under Home Office rules, those with less than four years service cannot claim benefits or work in the UK.

But, after an investigation by BBC News, the Home Office appears to have changed its policy.

It will now make an exception for those injured in combat and consider other situations on a case-by-case basis.

'Good soldier'

There are more than 7,000 Commonwealth citizens in the British armed forces.

Melbourne doesn't want to use his full name, but he has no regrets about joining up.

As a boy in Jamaica it's all he wanted to do.

What he finds hard to accept is being forced to leave the service after being medically discharged.

"I was very, very heart-broken," he says. "I did my best to be a good soldier.

"I totally loved it from the start."

He was first injured during basic training - the extreme cold damaged his hands and feet - and, once in his regiment, it got worse.

"I was like in excruciating pain," he recalls. "I can't walk, I can't even hold my weapon."

Three years and nine months after signing up he was told to leave - not just the Army, but the country.

Normally, personnel from the Commonwealth can only apply to stay in the UK after four years service.

Melbourne is not allowed to work, claim benefits or use the NHS.

The Royal British Legion pays his rent. He wants to stay, claim compensation and work.

'Suffers injury'

Simon Harrington, a solicitor who represents soldiers suffering from similar injuries, says Melbourne was "a fantastic soldier" who had "the potential to make a successful 22-year career".

If sent home, he says Melbourne will find it almost impossible to claim compensation.

Mr Harrington has 14 clients in the same position, but says this is the tip of the iceberg.

"It's anybody who suffers injury as a result of their service before they've served four years," he adds.

The Home Office declined to do interviews, but gave an initial statement to the BBC.

"Any Commonwealth citizen applying for settlement before their four years service is up can submit an application to remain in the UK on compassionate grounds," it reads.

"Where an individual has been medically discharged from our armed forces as a result of injury sustained in service we naturally view the case on special compassionate grounds."

But subsequently, that policy appeared to change.

The Home Office issued a new statement, which runs: "Where a member of our Armed Forces is medically discharged as a direct result of injury sustained during operations, the requirement for them to have completed four years service in order to qualify for settlement will normally be waived.

"If any cases of service men or women being refused settlement are as a direct result of injury sustained outside operations, we will look at them on a case-by-case basis."

So those injured in combat can normally stay.

Those injured in other ways will have to apply and make their case.

Melbourne has already been refused and so still faces removal from the UK.

"I just have to be strong and hope that in the long run something good happens," he says.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7059170.stm
 
#8
I listened to this on the Today programme on Radio 4 this morning. They had it on the main news at 7am followed by a solicitor who was representing 12 cases of commonwealth soldiers who for various reasons were unable to reach the 4 year minimum period in the forces before they could apply for UK citizenship and were being threatened with deportation. It also seemed that those who had not reached the 4 year minimum and had been wounded on active service were also under the same threat. However no one from the MOD was available to be interviewed regarding this! It seems that MOD have now said that those injured on active service and who have not reached the 4 year point will now be given special consideration! The word pressure comes to mind!
What was unusual about this was that it was part of the main bulletin and headlines between 7 and 8 am but no word of it afterwords.
 

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
#9
BBC News 24 said the Home Office has now changed it's mind & anyone injured can stay.
I wonder why.
Pr!cks.
 
#10
Just by means of offering a comparison, if UK personnel transfer to the Australian Defence Forces they are only required to complete 90 days service before they are eligible (in fact I think they are required) to apply for an Australian passport. Dependants are then eligible after 3 years residency. Not that I've enquired you understand! :relax:

Obviously we need to avoid encouraging the services becoming an asylum short cut. I would suggest 12 months productive service (ie after completion of trg), or being injured on ops or a trg related accident would be sufficient grounds to ensure UK residency.

It seems rediculous that one can gain asylum by hijacking an Afghan airliner, yet being injured fighting for Queen and Country does not. :banned:

What is this nation coming to?

Regards,
MM
 
#11
I always thought it was 5 years.

I remember a Fijian in my battalion telling me that was what he had to do.

Also remember a guy from St Lucia and he said the same thing.

Don't see a problem with the five years but if you have been on tour and got injured then you should get a passport. What happened regarding the Gurkas was an absolute disgrace.
 
#12
Magic_Mushroom said:
.

It seems rediculous that one can gain asylum by hijacking an Afghan airliner, yet being injured fighting for Queen and Country does not. :banned:

What is this nation coming to?

Regards,
MM
MM dude

Its obvious; hijack an airplane and stay.
 
#13
I have no grief with requiring someone to complete their agreed terms of service to be elligible. Obvioulsy if through no fault of their own they cannot do so then they should be treated as special cases and granted citizenship if they want it.
 
#14
I believe it was Shakespear who said (in Henry V) "He who sheds his blood with me this day, is my brother"

If a member of the Commonwealth is willing to serve this country then we have a debt of honour to these soldiers. If they want to deport someone, then why not the good for nothing "Native" CHAV scum who cannot be bothered to get a job let alone travel half way round the world, to join the army of a country who does not appreciate them. Who would you like to keep in the UK?
 
#15
There are two seperate issues here, the first is the guys who are discharged due to genuine injuries.

The second is this-

He was first injured during basic training - the extreme cold damaged his hands and feet
Basic training in the Arctic?

Mr Harrington has 14 clients in the same position
I hope not all with this terrible cold injury.

There is a fella at my unit who has this terrible injury and therefore cant work outside, hold a weapon or do anything which would expose him to temperatures under 16'C.

It doesnt seem to stop him going out and spending his unearned wages though.
 
#16
JediKnight said:
I believe it was Shakespear who said (in Henry V) "He who sheds his blood with me this day, is my brother"

If a member of the Commonwealth is willing to serve this country then we have a debt of honour to these soldiers. If they want to deport someone, then why not the good for nothing "Native" CHAV scum who cannot be bothered to get a job let alone travel half way round the world, to join the army of a country who does not appreciate them. Who would you like to keep in the UK?
How wonderful to see that even in these times some one believes, or hopes that this government has a sense of honur!
 
#17
Biscuits_AB said:
Good. The Welsh should all go back to where they come from.
That would be whats now known as England then :)
 
#18
Oh FFS - you don't have to be in the Arctic for cold injuries. Some foreign students I trained with had never seen snow before going to SPTA. Not surprisingly, some suffered with cold injuries. Once you have suffered damage by cold - you are more prone to subsequent similar injuries (I think it is something to do with lasting damage to small veins etc)

Hardly their fault.

Incidentally before any "racist" chants begin. Similar situation exists for many British young people who normally experience nothing more severe than the air-con being set too low.

Shameful treatment of soldiers who have been prepared to give their lives for our country. Interesting that on the same day the guvmnt admits that two whole prisons are dedicated to holding foreign prisoners that can't be thrown out of the country.

Guvmnt unable to field a minister because it is his Scotland day presumably
 
#19
Understanding of cold injuries not spaz's strong point then

plenty of people downgraded by cold injuries, you wanna try it sometime
 
#20
Yet again a one size fits all approach is not the answer. Soldiers are promoted on merit and perhaps this should apply to those allowed to naturalise following injury before the 4 year mark. Good stay bad binned, hardly rocket science.
 

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