Soldiers family faces deportation

#1
I am completely sick of this wretched country and have come to the conclusion that, under the current corrupt cowardly and contemptible administration, it is not worth lifting a finger for.

There are plenty of unpleasant illegal immigrants at large in the UK, involved in drug and people smuggling, crime and all sorts of nasty dealings. There are even immigrants at large who are known to the police and are convicted of crimes. However, the despicable and incompetent Home Office has decided to take the path of least resistance and remove someone who has fully co-operated with the system, in order to meet "targets".

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/legal/article2352800.ece

Your country needs you... but not you: Soldiers' mother faces deportation

Leven Bowman served in Iraq. His brother Damian was an army poster boy. Now the Home Office wants to deport their mother and her 15-year-old daughter

By Ian Herbert and Nigel Morris
Published: 13 March 2007

Joy Bowman encouraged her Jamaican sons when they told her they wanted to join the Army in their adoptive country.

She watched them flourish as the youngest joined the British Army's Royal Logistics Corps and saw duty in Basra, while the eldest featured in a recruitment campaign to persuade more people from ethnic minorities to join the Army.

But five years after supporting her son during a perilous tour of Iraq, Mrs Bowman and her 15-year-old daughter, who is preparing for GCSEs, face being deported tomorrow - further victims of a Home Office that places its removal targets ahead of the role in British life played by those it is deporting.

Mrs Bowman, 49, who fled from an abusive husband in Jamaica six years ago, is due to be taken from her home in Newcastle upon Tyne's Benwell district today to a detention centre at Heathrow, where she is scheduled to be on a 12.40pm flight tomorrow to Jamaica - where domestic violence is a source of concern to Amnesty International.

Mrs Bowman's sons, whose army service brings an entitlement to British citizenship, said their mother had inspired them to join the forces. "I was proud to serve my country and the Government was happy enough for me to risk my life fighting in Iraq," said Leven Bowman, 28, who depended on letters, protein drinks and sun cream that his mother dispatched during his six months' service in Basra. "I can't understand how they can now threaten to deport my mother."

Damian Bowman, 24, a lorry driver in Northampton, added: "My mum wants to be a good citizen and to help people. It seems as though our service for this country counts for nothing."

Mrs Bowman has been a volunteer for the past five years at a children's hearing clinic in Gosforth, Newcastle, and has been studying at Sunderland University, with a view to becoming a nurse. She also helps elderly people with their gardens. Her Labour MP, David Clelland, and the Tyneside Community Action for Refugees paid tribute yesterday to her role in Newcastle life since arriving in 2000.

Details of Mrs Bowman's plight emerged as John Reid, the Home Secretary, hailed progress in streamlining the asylum system. "It is in nobody's interest for cases to drag on for years," he said yesterday. "It is not fair on those genuinely fleeing persecution who want to get on with their lives. It undermines our commitment to remove people who have no basis to be here."

Mrs Bowman said her British friends could not understand why she was encouraging her boys to enlist - an option available to them as immigrants from the Commonwealth. "I was really proud of them," she said. "I also felt the numb fear that every soldier's mother has felt - but when Levene said he had had enough of dodging bombs I said, 'No, stick with it.' Like many mothers, I think I've played my own little part for the country."

Mrs Bowman fears that her husband, from whom she is now divorced, will find her if she is sent back. "Jamaica is only a small island," she said. "I was repeatedly abused by my husband but the police ignored my complaints. Amnesty reports that thousands of women and girls in Jamaica are abused and that state is failing to effectively investigate the abuses."

The Refugee Council said the removal of a woman who had played a full role in British society reflected the Home Office practice of removing soft targets. "The Government is so focused on returns - and in many cases those who are less deserving of this outcome," said a spokeswoman.

Nick Clegg, the Liberal Democrats' home affairs spokesman, said: "The inefficiency of a system which allows years to elapse before a final decision is taken means that asylum seekers and their families develop roots in British society. Those roots then make any removal appear all the more unjust and illogical."

Mr Clelland said he hoped there could be "flexibility". "Joy's sons' role for this country is a factor which can play a part in her case."

An Immigration and Nationality Directorate spokesman said: "The Government has made it clear that it will take a robust approach to removing people from the country where they have no legal right to be here."

Kamila and Karina Kaya were living and studying in Birmingham until they lost their right to stay in the UK when they turned 18 in November. The twins, who want to become doctors, fled the Central Asian republic of Kyrgyzstan in 2003 after their parents were murdered. Despite winning a reprieve hours before they were due to be deported, they have since been arrested and are in Yarl's Wood detention centre awaiting the outcome of a judicial review into their case. They have not been given a date.

Farhat Khan was invited to meet Tony and Cherie Blair at a reception in recognition of her community work 48 hours before attending her final appeal against deportation. Mrs Khan, 54, from Peshawar, Pakistan, claimed asylum in the UK six years ago after fleeing a violent husband. She lives in Manchester. Her five children, who range in age from 12 to 30, face deportation with her. She is awaiting a decision on her case.

Afshin Azizian fled Iran for the UK in 1995, fearing he would be arrested for his involvement with the Iranian resistance. After losing his benefits, Mr Azizian, 38, has spent much of his time in Britain living on the streets, but has now been taken in by monks in Hampstead. Last year 1,000 people signed a petition presented to Downing Street calling for Mr Azizian to be allowed to remain here on compassionate grounds.

Olivia Hayes, a 20-year-old Australian, has been told to leave by the end of this month even though she is married to a UK national and is expecting his baby. Her case rests on an incorrect visa application. The Home Office says that overseas nationals planning to marry should apply for entry clearance from abroad, and not arrive on a visitor visa. Mrs Hayes is appealing for an exception to be made. Her husband must decide whether to leave with her or stay to be close to his mother, who has terminal cancer.

Gary Douglas, a 46-year-old computing consultant from New Zealand, had qualified for the highly skilled migrant worker programme when he and his teenage son moved to Cheltenham in 2005. But he was told last year that the rules had changed and his visa would not be automatically extended, as had been promised when he chose to settle in the UK. He will have to leave in December.
 
#2
Disgraceful.
 
#4
Ladies and Gentlemen - have to agree shameful actions by a target focused Government! Serving the country on Ops as her son did - allows them far more rights that those who seek to live within our society though attack it through drugs, criminal behaviour and terrorism. Actions like this so easily alienate those in society who seek to intigrate with out way of life.

Anyone know if she actually went or not? Lets hope someone saw sense in the end!

Cheers
 
#5
whats her MP is doing about it, does he/she know ? , she should use the tactics emloyed by the scumbags and plead her Human rights, it worked for them , it should work for her, in this case i would consider it justified.
 
#6
Sadly typical of an inadequate Home Office.

And another inadequate Home Secretary.
 
B

Biscuits_AB

Guest
#7
semper said:
whats her MP is doing about it, does he/she know ? , she should use the tactics emloyed by the scumbags and plead her Human rights, it worked for them , it should work for her, in this case i would consider it justified.
What are we doing about it? Can we have a petition going here?

Any Journalsts want to champion the cause. Mick Smith are you still reading this site?
 
#8
An Immigration and Nationality Directorate spokesman said: "The Government has made it clear that it will take a robust approach to removing people from the country where they have no legal right to be here."

Kn#b. This is all to make up the numbers and stats. They do sod all about the arrivals on the ferries daily when they could round 'em up and send them back, they won't touch those from Africa or most of the Middle East or the Balkans with their ready made tales who appeal for years, yet when hard working professionals are involved who pay taxes, integrate and contribute, they are out on their ear. 'robust approach' my a##e
 

maninblack

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
I know that I sound like a broken record but again I will say (based on being married to a non UK citizen) that as long as you follow all the correct procedures for immigration from abroad you have nothing to fear from the authorities except false accusations, incompetence, mismanagement, poor service from the consulate and ineptitude from the home office.

As far as I am concerend the UK immigration authoriites are incompetent and corrupt from top to bottom. The first time we dealt with anyone with any competence was on arrival at Gatwick.
 
#10
Not a surprise to me. We've got an F&C soldier who has put in his papers because his wife was not granted leave to remain. Naively she overstayed her visitor's visa and was in the country illegally for a while but I hoped IND would be flexible following their marriage. No chance, because she tried to go legit she was an easy target and sent packing. Result one unhappy soldier and one more gap in an already overstretched unit.
 
#11
intli said:
An Immigration and Nationality Directorate spokesman said: "The Government has made it clear that it will take a robust approach to removing people from the country where they have no legal right to be here."

Kn#b. This is all to make up the numbers and stats. They do sod all about the arrivals on the ferries daily when they could round 'em up and send them back, they won't touch those from Africa or most of the Middle East or the Balkans with their ready made tales who appeal for years, yet when hard working professionals are involved who pay taxes, integrate and contribute, they are out on their ear. 'robust approach' my a##e
You got there before me. They're happy to take a 'robust approach' with the easy targets. When it comes to the treasonous and outright hostile foreigners leeching on the country's resources, they become a little more diffident. This chap's family are a positive asset, but make an easy statistic for some fool of a Home office drone.
 
#13
Mercer was sacked mainly because of the effect of his words on recruiting. What the hell do they think this will do for getting recruits in the position this gy was?
 
#14
Let's keep bumping this one till we know more.
 
#16
Incredible. Do they shoot themselves in the foot on purpose with absurd cases like this. Shamefull.
 
#17
Bump!
 
#18
This is typical of the talk hard and persecute the good style of Jhn Reid. Thinking that he was clever by declarng the Home Office unfit, he now has aproblem, because it still is!! No doubt his taunch Jock chum Gordon "Lardy Brown will come to his aid by re-shuffling (something they practise) him before we actually see any results.

Was this poor woman returned?
 
#19
Just fired this off to my MLA;

Dear Lady Hermon,
Thank you for your reply to my last.
This time I am writing you because of this story in the papers;

http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/legal/article2352800.ece

I find it disgraceful that the family of these brave lads have been treated in this way as do other members of our website,
www.arrse.co.uk.
Admittedly,we do not know all the details as yet but it is still a bitter pill for these two brave lads who are prepared to,well,lay down their lives for this country.
Please raise this question in the House for us all.
http://www.arrse.co.uk/cpgn2/Forums/viewtopic/p=1149758.html#1149758

Thank you,
Yours sincerly,
Spike
 
#20
Sadly this is nothing new.

When I in Catterick in 1983 we had a guy from St. Kitts & Nevis who's wife and kid were sent back because he had forgotten to renew her passport and visa in time. Poor timing as St. Kitts & Nevis was just getting their independance from us.

Never did find out if they came back as I left there soon after.
 

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