Soldiers Attitude Towards Officers

#1
Am not an Officer, I'm a student at Uni completing a IT degree.
I plan on going for Officer entry after my degree.
I was at a pub last night and friends of friend were attending.
There was 3/4 Regular soldiers and a old guy from the TA.

We were talking and up came the point about me going for Officer entry, to hear "what what" and "champers sipper" was bruted out.
They were saying "join as a reg, Officers do fluff. There is the odd 'sound' Officer but most are up their own asses".

What generally is the attitude towards Officers from their soldiers (other than respect), am talking the bad cases?

Of course this was all water off a ducks back to me and off I went to the bar for some Bell's Whisk(e)y.
 
#3
No Wah?

Officers are taken by their manner and attitude, you get a good one, you are lucky and he will be listened to.

You get a public schoolboy with the "im in charge" attitude, you will be listened to, and then ignored.

The rank on your shoulder does not make you a good officer that soldiers listen to, having the nounce to see when a more experienced guy knows what to do, above you, makes a good officer, regardless of his rank.
Learning from people who have been there, makes you a good officer, and doing your best for your men, makes you a good officer.

Any new officer will be treated according to the way he treats his men, you act the cnut, you get treated as such, you do your best for them, they will give you respect.

As a new officer, you need to learn fast, that you have two ears and one mouth, so you should listen twice as much as you speak, (To coin a phrase from Sharpe) old saying, but its one that works.
 
#4
In my experience, there's always lots of banter going round about the officers, but none of it really means anything- it really is just banter.

As a soldier it is your prerogative and part of your job to ridicule
1. your superiors
2. your inferiors
3. your mates
4. every other regiment
5. Territorials
6.the Navy

The truth is that though we moan, we love each other dearly and all arms and ranks need one another equally.

YD
 
#5
YorkieDragoon said:
In my experience, there's always lots of banter going round about the officers, but none of it really means anything- it really is just banter.

As a soldier it is your prerogative and part of your job to ridicule
1. your superiors
2. your inferiors
3. your mates
4. every other regiment
5. Territorials
6.the Navy

The truth is that though we moan, we love each other dearly and all arms and ranks need one another equally.

You missed out the Crabs :wink:

YD
 
#6
PRC-349 said:
YorkieDragoon said:
In my experience, there's always lots of banter going round about the officers, but none of it really means anything- it really is just banter.

As a soldier it is your prerogative and part of your job to ridicule
1. your superiors
2. your inferiors
3. your mates
4. every other regiment
5. Territorials
6.the Navy

The truth is that though we moan, we love each other dearly and all arms and ranks need one another equally.

You missed out the Crabs :wink:

YD
A foolish over-sight- thanks for your correction... 8)
 
#7
As a new Officer - the smartest thing you can do - is to have a quiet word with your Platoon Sergeant,and ask him what his advice would be.

He can guide you through those early, crucial, days of your first Command.
 
#8
On course very recently and saw this played out a few times. Australian Army, so the OR-Officer relationship is probably driven by a slightly different culture.

Just before hopping into the vehicles after the last assault in the Ex, the subbie who commanded the assault made a short speech to the assembled LTs, trainee Patrol Commanders and Troopers who made up the troop. He commenced with "Gentlemen of Cavalry .... " to the amusement of the subbies and bemusement of the diggers.

A CPL later remarked to me: "Sir, you blokes might be Gentlemen, but we're just cnuts" .....
 
#9
As has already been mentioned, the best new subbies tend to be the ones who accept that their knowledge gained from courses is no substitute for the experience of their men/N.C.O's. I think the hardest thing must be finding the balance between taking advice on board whilst still being 'in command'. Humility is key, as is the correct personality. There are few things worse than a new troop leader who has decided that he knows it all and has no requirement to learn from his boys. Obviously this is two opposite ends of the spectrum and most tend to fall somewhere in between.
 
#10
YorkieDragoon said:
In my experience, there's always lots of banter going round about the officers, but none of it really means anything- it really is just banter.

As a soldier it is your prerogative and part of your job to ridicule
1. your superiors
2. your inferiors
3. your mates
4. every other regiment
5. Territorials
6.the Navy

The truth is that though we moan, we love each other dearly and all arms and ranks need one another equally.

YD
You missed out

7. any females after either having sex with them, knowing they will never get to have sex with them or thinking they r completly minging! haha
8. the RAF reg because they think they are an elite force.
 
#11
The big thing to realise is that loyalty goes downwards as well as upwards.... If, as an officer, you are not loyal to your soldiers then you are on the road to nowhere
 
#13
Ulster_Rifleman said:
The big thing to realise is that loyalty goes downwards as well as upwards.... If, as an officer, you are not loyal to your soldiers then you are on the road to nowhere
hi, totally unrelated but r u still a rifleman?
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#16
Long ago a friend of mine was touring around interviewing leadwers on leadership. The then Commanding General of the USMC was rather stuck for an answer, finally came up with 'I guess you look after them, they look after you.' NB the order he put it in.
 
#17
Ref the quote from the USMC general, as part of a debrief on any not quite correct solution to a TEWT, DS always used to say "Remember it isn't just a tactical exercise, you may want to use your soldiers tomorrow too..."

Then again when I commissioned, bearing in mind the saying was over a 100 years old, you always heard as an admin coaching spiel "First the horses, then the men and then yourself..." which has stayed with me all my life - civil and military - as a management principle without peer.
 
#18
Ref the quote from the USMC general, as part of a debrief on any not quite correct solution to a TEWT, DS always used to say "Remember it isn't just a tactical exercise, you may want to use your soldiers tomorrow too..."

Then again when I commissioned, bearing in mind the saying was over a 100 years old, you always heard as an admin coaching spiel "First the horses, then the men and then yourself..." which has stayed with me all my life - civil and military - as a management principle without peer.
 
#19
Cuddles said:
Then again when I commissioned, bearing in mind the saying was over a 100 years old, you always heard as an admin coaching spiel "First the horses, then the men and then yourself..."
"See to your men first" was virtually the first bit of advice I received. If you are in your gonk bag, having been fed and watered before any of your men then you not doing your job. First up and last to bed.

The "perks" of being commissioned are really reserved for back in the mess.
 
#20
to be a good officer you must:

enter SJARS late
not listen to your SME soldiers
fop around the Brigadier
not listen to SNCOs
Micro manage the simplest tasks
Not put forward soldiers course applications
Walk around with the air of Im always right
Forget that NCOs are probably older and wiser than you
Turn up for inspection and inspect soldiers whilst sloppily dressed
Turn up late for work
Volunteer for 30 days watchkeeping in the Stan just to get a bit of tin
Do a really obscure degree to get promoted quicker
Have a stupid name like Jeremy or Tarquin
Forget that you are not at Eton
Look at NCOs ties to see if they are in the same club/school/Ballingdon club
Get the squadron on a bloody poinless exercise just so you can get a tick in the box
And knock off early before anyone can find you.
Hide at the back of a CFT kiss arsing the CO
Patronise anyone who doesnt have a 2:1 from Cambridge
Believe that you are superior human being cos you are living in the mess
Demand your own vehicle and tent for exercise

if you did this you would be a genuine officer in the British Army!
 

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