Soldier in uniform refused service in supermarket

#1
I had some difficulty believing it when I read it - in the Telegraph, not the Mail - but it seems to have actually happened as they describe. I had more a more difficult time when I looked for the thread here on ARRSE to see that everyone is so inured to this sort of thing that it no longer carries weight; emotional, moral or anything else, apparently. Or maybe I was the first to see it (no, I don't believe that).

I think the trouble may be that the Mail has cried 'wolf' whenever it sees a flash of grey fur, leading to outrage-fatigue. I see that in this story a Co-operative spokesworm has said that: "This was a genuine mistake on the part of our two members of staff, and has nothing to do with anyone’s ethnicity, religion or personal views ", which means that it was almost certainly all three.

Well, I boycotted the Co-op years ago when they sold me corpse-rotten chicken on two consecutive occasions, so I can't boycott the bastards again. Not that they have a branch anywhere near me now anyway. I am offended.
 
#5
So basically, a bloke goes to a family party whilst still in desert rig and decides to buy a slab of ale on the way?

The lad should have been served with his alcohol but then swiftly bottled for being a big timing honcho.
 

OldSnowy

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#6
Is it not against the rools to buy alcohol while in Uniform? Same rules as apply to going to a pub likewise?
 
#7
#8
Why on earth arn't the Coop disciplining the staff involve after all, preferably kicking their arses really hard down to the local jobcenter! :- A Co-op spokeswoman said:
“We do not have a policy that states that when wearing uniform, members of the armed forces should not be served alcohol or cigarettes and all are welcome in our stores.”
What excuse have the two individuals got for refusing to serve the soldier? Unless of course the answer is hidden here:- "has nothing to do with anyone’s ethnicity, religion or personal views." Hmm.... It would be interesting to know details of the two people concerned!!
 
#10
In fact it is an offence under the Licesning Act for a licensee to supply alcohol to a police officer on duty.
IFIRC, that case involved a Bobby buying some lunch, not alcohol
 
#12
In fact it is an offence under the Licesning Act for a licensee to supply alcohol to a police officer on duty.
Was, with some exceptions - under s178 Licencing Act 1964. However, that whole Act was repealed by the Licensing Act 2003, which (IIRC) doesn't contain any reference to supplying constables, on duty or in uniform.
 
#13
As I recall, a few years ago the CO-OP hit the news for a similar stunt , but involving a Policeman in uniform and he was alaso refused service.
Can`t be arssed to try to google it
Edit to add link type thing

http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/stand...ier-refused-beer-after-tour-in-afghanistan.do
OK I cracked
In fact it is an offence under the Licesning Act for a licensee to supply alcohol to a police officer on duty.
Many years ago I worked for T.E. Scofields finest supermarket chain (Tesco's to you and me) whilst still in school.
And part of the training was in telling us that we could not serve police officers in uniform with booze.
I always wondered how big a problem coppers getting pissed on duty was to necessitate this law.

I worked for Tesco back in 1993. I was unaware the law had changed. Do they go for drugs now, rather than booze? Hence the relaxation of the law?
 
#14
Is it not against the rools to buy alcohol while in Uniform? Same rules as apply to going to a pub likewise?
Not before I left in 2006. However there was a Queen's Reg which ordered that we were not to consume alcohol in public in uniform unless on duty. Guess pre- & post-parade beers in London counted as duty!
 
#15
In fact it is an offence under the Licesning Act for a licensee to supply alcohol to a police officer on duty.
You forgot the second part of that sentence:

'Unless accompanied by a Senior Officer.'

There is, of course, no definition of a Senior Officer provided!

It may well be immaterial now if the 2003 Act doesn't include that though!
 
#16
And part of the training was in telling us that we could not serve police officers in uniform with booze.
I always wondered how big a problem coppers getting pissed on duty was to necessitate this law.
That was clearly a Tesco "rule" - the uniform being a red-herring - admittedly, how else would you tell whether a cop was on duty or not? And, the strict letter of the law involves them merely being on the licensed premises, as well as serving them "liquor and refreshment". I have no idea what the strict legal meaning of "refreshment" is but, as the Kurgen pointed out, the public case was around a purchase of a sausage roll, not a crate of lager.

Although you could probably claim that purchasing lunch was, under Health and Safety regs (unless it involved Ginsters) part of your "duty" (assuming no police or Service canteen).

I worked for Tesco back in 1993. I was unaware the law had changed. Do they go for drugs now, rather than booze? Hence the relaxation of the law?
I suspect it is more to do with publicans being less likely to bribe the beat bobbie with a pint if he ignores closing time nowadays because, well, there aren't any beat bobbies and we've got 24hr drunking!
 
#17
There is, of course, no definition of a Senior Officer provided!

It may well be immaterial now if the 2003 Act doesn't include that though!
Hmm,

Offences in relation to constables.

If the holder of a justices’ licence—

(a)knowingly suffers to remain on the licensed premises any constable during any part of the time appointed for the constable’s being on duty, except for the purpose of the execution of the constable’s duty, or

(b)supplies any liquor or refreshment, whether by way of gift or sale, to any constable on duty except by authority of a superior officer of the constable, or

(c)bribes or attempts to bribe any constable,

he shall be liable, on a first conviction to a fine not exceeding £25, and on a subsequent conviction to a fine not exceeding £50.
"Superior" needing less explanation than "senior", I'd expect, and (in theory, at least) allowing the station sergeant to send the nig down the offie for a crate or two!
 
#18
Barred from buying alcohol in uniform? How shameful and what a sad indication of declining social standards.

It used to be mandatory when patronising field brothels.
 
#19
Sounds a bit typical of the old dart, does not work here in queensland, friday lunchtime you cannot move at the local bottle shop for squadies in uniform ,stocking up on beer for the weekend, one of the locals here caused his self a bit of grief by taking photo,s of 3 area cars parked up outside a pub on a sunday lunchtime, is abit scary to be pulled over by a cop stinking of booze,
 
#20
Croydon? I wonder what 'sort' of staff they were…
 

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