Soldier found dead in camp after three weeks 09/02/2020

I'd like to think so too but it's probably because so many people are wearing so many hats (stand down the Para's) there's no longer time to do all the basic sh1te we used to have to do, something had to go!

What is so time consuming that basic 'sh*te' as you call it can not be conducted?
Failure to maintain basic standards of health, safety, and FFR in barracks leads to shoddy practice in the field.
"We don't have time" is not a valid reason... it is a poor excuse.
 
A tragedy... Whatever happened to Unit/Bn Standing Orders detailing responsibilities and duties of care? Nightly bed checks by the Company Orderly Sergeant... to ensure against fire, drunk soldiers drowning in their own vomit, etc. Weekly accommodation checks by the CQMS and his storeman? Daily checks by the Platoon Sergeant to ensure basic standards of hygiene/ catching skiving b******s? Weekly 'walk arounds' by the CSM and OC? Never mind 'out processing' - getting a chit signed by the Arms Kote Storman, CQMS and presenting it to the CSM - a quick exit interview by the OC?...…..

I found that most soldiers were easily able to cope with the 'impositions' that you've outlined and looked back in hindsight as 'coming with the territory'....on the other hand, what rankled with some, often for a life-time, were memories of being let down or suffering long-term career damage due to someone's lack of interest, ignorance or incompetence.
 
I think that the Army has decided to treat soldiers like adults, not children. 99% of the time that works - just like in the real world.

Well I have had no problem with that. And it's true that people kill themselves in civvy street. Usually as in the case of one colleague who killed herself, we noted her absence when she didn't turn up for shift- as you do- and were told-and that was the following day. But we knew the details within 24 hrs.
As with most adults if a kidda has a problem, you get to find out PDQ- the military is a far smaller world that civvy street.. Yes I can understand the leeways you can get in moving between places on posting, but this isn't really the case. That's what I can't get my head around, That someone lay dead in a room without being noticed. I mean it's outrageous enough in the outside world, implying that people don't care, can't be bothered. More to the point a dead squaddie is after all a wasted asset.
 
Sounds rather vague that! How would they know it was natural causes? Without a PM.
A PM in England takes place unless an individual is under medical supervision in certain time period.
I should have clarified, if the death is determined to natural by post mortem. His GP could also certify in some situations.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Did it have to be a soldier's life ?
No. I've been in units where someone has taken their own life, died of natural causes or accident. I've also lost a son on Ops.

I was obviously referring to some of what we'd have called mundane admin tasks, and yes I also obviously realise there was a reason for them.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
No. I've been in units where someone has taken their own life, died of natural causes or accident. I've also lost a son on Ops.

I was obviously referring to some of what we'd have called mundane admin tasks, and yes I also obviously realise there was a reason for them.
Then perhaps they should be reinstated, with an order of precedence.
As these checks are for safety they might well be considered more important than, for example, organising an army presence on an alphabetti spaghetti march.

Others have mentioned duty of care, I believe most of us would consider that to be paramount.
 
I found that most soldiers were easily able to cope with the 'impositions' that you've outlined and looked back in hindsight as 'coming with the territory'....on the other hand, what rankled with some, often for a life-time, were memories of being let down or suffering long-term career damage due to someone's lack of interest, ignorance or incompetence.

Spot on Stan'
 
Actually, if I just failed to turn up, that would trigger a welfare check. Nothing childish about that. It’s just good old fashioned concern

Yep - in my (civi) working life I can think of a few incidents.

Plymouth City Council - Chap didn't return from lunch one afternoon. After an hour police called. he'd had a heart attack and died on way to hospital.

Building Society - manager lady didn't turn up for work. No phone call by 10:00 (phone in if you're sick rule). It was known she lived alone. Regional manager telephoned her. No answer. Police called. Explanations given and police visited. Lady found dead in bed.

Nothing big brother ish - just old fashioned employee care and also concern from colleagues.
 
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A lot has been discussed about the situation, but there was also still a life and a man behind the tragedy. Bernie truly was kind, generous, loyal and possessed a tremendously Irish sense of honour. He loved nothing more than a good debate as long as it stayed friendly (get him on religion and he would talk even a Bishop down within 3 hours, my local vicar made it 2 hours and gave in - and both men were still smiling at the end of it). He loved celebrating with family and friends and would go massively out of his way at times to ensure it happened.

He was very proud when, on here, somebody (I think it was CaptainPlume) wrote that he was a lovely bloke but thick as 2 short planks - it meant a lot to him to be recognised for being nice. His loyalty when he granted it had no limits. He would do whatever it took for those he cared about and respected. He supported me at times when I had lost all feeling of safety and gave me that back. He was perfectly happy on many a 2am ramble in the countryside talking about everything and nothing companionably, though put him in a crowd and his personal magnetism (and good looks) caused some entertaining issues (before he met Beth, obviously), that I was guilty of sitting back and laughing at from the corner.

Everyone who knew him, and I whom I spoke to yesterday said the same thing "I loved him". But no one loved him more than his wife, a truly kind, funny and sweet person who matched him well and tried to not pressure him whilst being there always.
He was a truly amazing guy. Hope he had an amazing send off today. RIP Batman
 
3 weeks for a driving course. You squaddie must be as thick as mince.
Yeah...... Mastiff, Jackal, Sabre, in fact any one of a dozen variants you have no knowledge of. I shouldn’t have bitten but your bait was too annoying.
 
3 weeks for a driving course. You squaddie must be as thick as mince.

Think on numbnuts, Never having driven before, first off, a LWB rover, learn to drive, then self recovery, maintenance, loading, test. Passed. then HGV, a 4 ton Bedford RL, winch wagon, ( *4 gear levers) over the training ranges, (Mud, humps and bumps, deep ditches and pools of stagnant water) self recovery from a ditch, map reading, use and function of a winch and ground anchors, again involved maintenance, towing and loading weight distribution, night driving, all aspects of civil driving and military law, classroom lectures on the finer points of driving. long runs with loads, towing and reversing trailers. Test passed. HGV3. total time taken 8 weeks. From F*** All to HGV. cost to me, Zilch! 1972............. cost to a civvie, today well in excess of £2000. END

Bedford RL. straight 6 in line, 153642 firing order. 4.9 litre engine 110 BHP.

* Standard 4 speed and reverse. High low ratio. 2-4 wheel drive. winch engage-disengage. IIRC.
 
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Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
12th November 2020
Two members of the British Army are to appear at military court this month, relating to an attack on another soldier.
One of the troops is charged with carrying out a racially-motivated attack on Lance Corporal Bernard Mongan.
The charges are in relation to an attack on LCpl Mongan in 2018 outside a Catterick nightclub.
LCpl Mongan, originally from Ireland, was found dead at his barracks at the start of this year, after being missing for three weeks.
His death is also being investigated by the Army.
One soldier is charged with racially aggravated grievous bodily harm, while the other service member is charged with grievous bodily harm and actual bodily harm.
A British Army spokesman said: "We can confirm that one soldier has been charged with racially aggravated grievous bodily harm and actual bodily harm, and another soldier has been charged with grievous bodily harm and actual bodily harm.
"It would be inappropriate to comment further at this time."
 
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