Soldier died from exposure to dep. uranium during Gulf War.

#2
Professor Busby said he had visited Iraq in 2000 and had found particles of depleted uranium with dangerously high radiation levels near the wrecks of tanks destroyed during the war.
Means that

The soldier served in the Gulf between January and May 1991, cleaning tanks before they were sent back the UK, and left the Army in 1992.
Became exposed to radiation and causing cancer. Hmmm does the doctor not know the difference between sitting in a destroyed hulk hit by a DU round and pressure washing a dirty tank?
 
#3
Very sad. I knew Stu at 3 Div.. Rest In Peace mate.
 
#4
Jeez, I knew him as well. I was at 3ADSR between 89 and 91.

RIP buddy.
 
#5
Pacifist_Jihadist said:
Professor Busby said he had visited Iraq in 2000 and had found particles of depleted uranium with dangerously high radiation levels near the wrecks of tanks destroyed during the war.
Means that

The soldier served in the Gulf between January and May 1991, cleaning tanks before they were sent back the UK, and left the Army in 1992.
Became exposed to radiation and causing cancer. Hmmm does the doctor not know the difference between sitting in a destroyed hulk hit by a DU round and pressure washing a dirty tank?
One despairs at times, are these people really so dense that it hasn't occurred to them that if DU rounds were so dangerous in radiation terms, that every coalition tank crewman who served in the two Gulf wars would now be either dead or suffering from cancer? :roll: :roll: :roll:
 
#6
RIP mate not a good way to go what ever the cause.
 
#7
Jaeger said:
Pacifist_Jihadist said:
Professor Busby said he had visited Iraq in 2000 and had found particles of depleted uranium with dangerously high radiation levels near the wrecks of tanks destroyed during the war.
Means that

The soldier served in the Gulf between January and May 1991, cleaning tanks before they were sent back the UK, and left the Army in 1992.
Became exposed to radiation and causing cancer. Hmmm does the doctor not know the difference between sitting in a destroyed hulk hit by a DU round and pressure washing a dirty tank?
One despairs at times, are these people really so dense that it hasn't occurred to them that if DU rounds were so dangerous in radiation terms, that every coalition tank crewman who served in the two Gulf wars would now be either dead or suffering from cancer? :roll: :roll: :roll:
I see your point but,, the nasty stuff is safely encased within the very core of the round itself. Only when the thing is detonated & spread all over the place extremley violently that probs may occour. I for one belive there may have been some strange shenanigans going on out there. GW1 was like one big infomercial to the arms industry, how we all marveled at bombs through letterboxes etc. Who knows what else went on ?? I personaly know 2 vets who have serious dehilibating diseases despite living a reasonably healthy life style. The Govt must think the same aswell as they would,nt have sent that questionaire out, about 10 yrs ago to EVERY serviceman who was in at the time of the war .

RIP Soldier

LT
 
#8
LoneTree said:
I see your point but,, the nasty stuff is safely encased within the very core of the round itself. Only when the thing is detonated & spread all over the place extremley violently that probs may occour. I for one belive there may have been some strange shenanigans going on out there. GW1 was like one big infomercial to the arms industry, how we all marveled at bombs through letterboxes etc. Who knows what else went on ?? I personaly know 2 vets who have serious dehilibating diseases despite living a reasonably healthy life style. The Govt must think the same aswell as they would,nt have sent that questionaire out, about 10 yrs ago to EVERY serviceman who was in at the time of the war .

RIP Soldier

LT
Do these said DU items, er, become in any way dangerous if, say they were buffed on a wire wheel and given as presentaion pieces? :? :alien: :puker: :cyclopsani: :cyclops:
 
#9
CC_TA said:
LoneTree said:
I see your point but,, the nasty stuff is safely encased within the very core of the round itself. Only when the thing is detonated & spread all over the place extremley violently that probs may occour. I for one belive there may have been some strange shenanigans going on out there. GW1 was like one big infomercial to the arms industry, how we all marveled at bombs through letterboxes etc. Who knows what else went on ?? I personaly know 2 vets who have serious dehilibating diseases despite living a reasonably healthy life style. The Govt must think the same aswell as they would,nt have sent that questionaire out, about 10 yrs ago to EVERY serviceman who was in at the time of the war .

RIP Soldier

LT
Do these said DU items, er, become in any way dangerous if, say they were buffed on a wire wheel and given as presentaion pieces? :? :alien: :puker: :cyclopsani: :cyclops:
Ummm , has the said piece ever been used in a game of mess rugby after the presentation & sort of landed in the fire a few times 8O :D

LT
 
#10
It, might have, got a bit warm on the buffing/wire wheel. I'm sure the dust couldn't have got in my lungs - I was using a breathing filter at the time. B&H filters :)
 
#11
The risk from DU particles particularly after impact were well known and advertised before GW1. Anyone stupid enoug to put a DU Rd on a grinder or buffing wheel deserves a Darwin Award.

That said, it is a poor show that the MoD failed to send an expert witness in the Inquest
 
#12
Herrumph said:
The risk from DU particles particularly after impact were well known and advertised before GW1. Anyone stupid enoug to put a DU Rd on a grinder or buffing wheel deserves a Darwin Award.

That said, it is a poor show that the MoD failed to send an expert witness in the Inquest
Calm down - It didn't have feckin DU running through the middle of it like a stick of rock! :) If I had realised that it was DU I obviously wouldn't have put it on a wire or buffing wheel. (I'd have got some other twaat to do it for me!)
 
#13
Jaeger said:
Pacifist_Jihadist said:
Professor Busby said he had visited Iraq in 2000 and had found particles of depleted uranium with dangerously high radiation levels near the wrecks of tanks destroyed during the war.
Means that

The soldier served in the Gulf between January and May 1991, cleaning tanks before they were sent back the UK, and left the Army in 1992.
Became exposed to radiation and causing cancer. Hmmm does the doctor not know the difference between sitting in a destroyed hulk hit by a DU round and pressure washing a dirty tank?
One despairs at times, are these people really so dense that it hasn't occurred to them that if DU rounds were so dangerous in radiation terms, that every coalition tank crewman who served in the two Gulf wars would now be either dead or suffering from cancer? :roll: :roll: :roll:
Not quite as dense as the DU we were told fack all about I imagine.
 
#14
CC_TA said:
Herrumph said:
The risk from DU particles particularly after impact were well known and advertised before GW1. Anyone stupid enoug to put a DU Rd on a grinder or buffing wheel deserves a Darwin Award.

That said, it is a poor show that the MoD failed to send an expert witness in the Inquest
Calm down - It didn't have feckin DU running through the middle of it like a stick of rock! :) If I had realised that it was DU I obviously wouldn't have put it on a wire or buffing wheel. (I'd have got some other twaat to do it for me!)
Thats you told CC :D , seriously tho , the battle grounds must of been awash with particles picked up by our Vehs. Easily digested when hosing them down.

LT
 
#15
This is a ferocious complicated subject. I started a thread on it a while ago (which I now can't find) and I've been trying to gen meself up about it ever since. It's not as clear-cut as some folks would like to present it. There's been entirely too little research done on the subject for anybody to make any sort of judgement call.

MsG
 
#16
A dreadful thing to happen to anyone, whatever the circumstances. I think I see an expert witness trying to make a name for himself though. A rate of six per million means 360 people per year coming down with the condition. The overwhelming majority of those will not have had any exposure to DU dust, why should this case have that particular cause, other than the families belief?
 
#17
Bugsy said:
This is a ferocious complicated subject. I started a thread on it a while ago (which I now can't find) and I've been trying to gen meself up about it ever since. It's not as clear-cut as some folks would like to present it. There's been entirely too little research done on the subject for anybody to make any sort of judgement call.

MsG
Lift corner of carpet , use bass broom in swinging motion while whistling :evil:

LT
 
#18
A sad way to go and condolences to the family.

But - as a mere infanteer, I thought these beasts did not "detonate" they were basically just a hunk of very heavy and dense metal ? - an overgrown armour-piercing round rather than an exploding shell ?

DU radiation levels are lower than levels found in the natural metal. DU is described by the WHO as "weakly radioactive" - so the learned professors "dangerously radioactive" is a bit OTT. Add in that a figure of 6 per million per year dying of that particular cancer means that 360 people die here in the UK from it every year and it sounds rare but not that uncommon ?.

I'm not saying its not dangerous - like any heavy metal dust with an added minor radiation hazard ? - but the WHO recommendations to their own staff working in war zones are hardly full of doom and destruction - a lot of terms like "tenuous".
http://www.who.int/ionizing_radiation/en/Recommend_Med_Officers_final.pdf

The washing tanks bit also sounds like a complete red-herring. At what range did the majority of engagements take place in Gulf 1 and how much DU dust would have ended up on our wagons afterwards as a result . How much would still have been there when the wagons were cleaned ( x weeks ?) later ?
Sounds to me like MoD should have put up someone to talk a bit of moderation in response to the Prof ?
 
#19
MoD grip my sh it on these issues. I remember when we were given 12 DU Fin rounds to carry on GW1.

'Don't worry they are perfectly safe...' we were told '...but just as a precaution if you are handling them then wear your gloves and let us know if they get knocked/scratched or chipped.'

I mean FFS!! They are either safe to handle/use or they're not - make your bloody minds up... :x

CW

PS...and don't get me started about those fcuking injections - nearly 10 years later my hair started to fall out! Coincidence?..HA!
 
#20
At least 5 RAF Armourer mates of mine who I served with have died since Granby of illneses that we reckon they got from being down there,3 in the last year alone.
Leikemia or Cancer mainly with no family history.
 

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