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Soddit mode

I'm a relative youngster at 52 but am definitely getting into the soddit mode. Been on furlough since Easter and now being offered 8 mths pay to f#%* off and work somewhere else.
Soddit I'll take that and sit out the recession, look for a job in the spring.
[/QUOTE

Dangerious, very mentally iffy. when the recession kicked in, in 2008, I found myself out of work, one month on site 2 off, 4 on. 3 off etc. The longest time out of work was 6 months, in that time your day instead of starting , for me at 05.30 , slowly expanded to 6.00 O'clock, then 7, then 7.30, and you get used to lazy days, once phoning the agencies, your mates in the trade, Personnel managers at the big construction, electrical company's is over, you get used too doing sod all, and when you do get a start, its doubly difficult to revert back to the old routine.

At your age, with retirement only a few years away, the unconscious thought of retirement, is the spur that conversely, slows you down. In my case beacause my trade is-was very physical, as the years rolled on, it became increasing obvious that these now old bones just could not cope any more, and so after 50.5 years working in my trade, I packed it in, already knowing what lay ahead, due to being out of work, for what amounted to, if added up, several years. You are 52, when it hit me, I was 58.
 
i have a mortgage free house dont owe anyone a penny. Not Rich but just comfortable have ALL I need but now gone mental on buying stuff I want . ole age . huh
Buy what you want. If you still have more money coming in than going out after doing that, then fill your boots. You can always buy some new regalia....;)
 
I'm sort of the opposite I suppose - 'only' 51 and been retired for the last 4 years.

It's taken a lifestyle change, but we now just work with the budget we get from the dosh the investments earn.

No kids, or any other family members that will need the money.

Weirdest thing is trying to work out when to start spending the actual capital without putting ourselves at risk, or under spending and leaving a wad for no good reason.

Both folks are in their 70's now so I suppose if they leave anything will shape that decision too - not expecting anything as they are both with younger partners now, so anything would be a bonus.

Do I miss having a 'soddit' attitude as before? A little bit, but I don't miss working even more.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
"Confirmed bachelors" can have kids - I know of two couples (1 x pair confirmed bachelor, 1 x pair confirmed bachelorettes) who have adopted children and are very happy famalies.
But that means he has to take on responsibility and the compromise if living with someone else, which is not his thing. Happy with his life as it is. My daughter and her husband talked over adoption but decided against it.
 
A bit less than a year to go until this fixed term contract I'm on expires, then another year until the state pension kicks in. I could jack now though, as the various lump sums plus pensions I'm already drawing plus the wife's works pension if she decides to jack early, (or her salary if she decides to keep working), would be more than enough to keep us until my state pension starts. There'd be another 8 years until her state pension starts but I'm still sure we'll be OK until then - we don't live extravagantly.

I'm definitely in soddit mode. Really can't be arrsed about work, (and thus totally enjoying working/shirking from home), just potter around now and lockdown is saving us loadsamoney. Well apart from the shite she buys from Amazon of course.
 
I definitely am in Soddit Mode - as per @sirbhp 's definition.
Whilst a bit younger (at the tender age of 63)
and having spent money on experiences- not things - and kids are now doing the same - whats left is not going to the grave with me.

I still love a bargain ( I buy new clothes rarely , and look in a Charity Shop first ) - but will happily spend £2000 on a weeks fishing in Norway - or bugger off sailing with mates and spend whatever it takes to share the adventure.

Being divorced helps.
I value my independence a lot and am going to keep it that way until croak.
 
It's threads like this that make me realise that at 38 and still serving I'm quite the young pup on ARRSE! Myself and the Mrs don't want kids though and with both of us being on reasonably good incomes I too think sod it and buy things I want. My dad died at 57 and his dad around the same age so I just think sod it, enjoy life while I still have it.

We’re in more or less the same boat. Dad died at 53, grandparents in their 60s.
Me & her indoors don’t buy each other Birthday or Christmas presents as we just have what we want when we want it all year round.
Cars, holidays & all the gizzits & gizmos I need.
Sod it. There are no pockets in a shroud.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
Dangerious, very mentally iffy. when the recession kicked in, in 2008, I found myself out of work, one month on site 2 off, 4 on. 3 off etc. The longest time out of work was 6 months, in that time your day instead of starting , for me at 05.30 , slowly expanded to 6.00 O'clock, then 7, then 7.30, and you get used to lazy days, once phoning the agencies, your mates in the trade, Personnel managers at the big construction, electrical company's is over, you get used too doing sod all, and when you do get a start, its doubly difficult to revert back to the old routine.

At your age, with retirement only a few years away, the unconscious thought of retirement, is the spur that conversely, slows you down. In my case beacause my trade is-was very physical, as the years rolled on, it became increasing obvious that these now old bones just could not cope any more, and so after 50.5 years working in my trade, I packed it in, already knowing what lay ahead, due to being out of work, for what amounted to, if added up, several years. You are 52, when it hit me, I was 58.
Entirely. I expected the money at 59 to cover no more than 18 months and I did look for jobs. But all I've done in my life is destroy tanks and work on IBM mainframes. If neither of them wanted me, I had to set my sights low.

You have no idea how good it felt when I realised I'd make it to State Retirement without working.

Aaaaand relax.
 

Q_Man

Old-Salt
I am but a pup at 45 (this weekend, in case you want to send a card / beer). I have my army pension and a decent council salary - that may sound like an oxymoron but just had a promotion and gone back to the wage I left the army on last year.

Wife, although a professional (not that kind of professional, hasn't worked "properly" since our eldest was born almost 12 years ago. Youngest is only 4 and middle one is 6 so can't see me stopping working until youngest leaves uni / gets a job / marries money.

Don't mind too much. Work is a bit shit, but we have a nice house, 2 functional not flash cars, one foreign holiday a year and 3 or 4 mini breaks in the UK. Don't save much, banking on two pensions.

Life is too short, could be hit by a bus tomorrow. My mate went into hospital for some check ups last November, never left, wife and 8 year old son left behind.

I've always had the soddit attitude - was a firm member of the weekend millionaire club, but have never been in debt and will always work.

You can't take it with you.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Part of the soddit for me was a couple of health issues coupled with a realisation that the bloke who owns the majority shares in the business is a bit of a cock. I think that he's changed since we started working together 20 years ago, but over the last 2-3 years I've found myself increasingly at odds with how he runs the business. Tecnically I have a vote, but then he just chooses to do what he wants, so I now only go into the office periodically for the odd half day to do accounts & expenses and have my own set of clients. I'm one of those who is happy to work at home BTW.

I am starting to develop my work outside the company which will enable me to disengage from the company completely in a couple of years should I so choose. In practice I'll probably continue to work for the company 1-2 days per week depending on my other work.

I will probably keep working one or two days per week as long as I enjoy it partly because I get to go to interesting places and do interesting stuff. That will enable us (self & SWMBO) to have good holidays and decent cars. Covid has hit the value of my pension, but once it recovers I'll be able to live comfortably hence the plan for 2-3 years.

My old man was made redundant at 62 from a company that he'd been with all his working life. He died at 70 and I've no wish to work until I drop, hence my plan to do what I want when I turn 62. If I do work it will be because I want to, not because I need to.
 

wheel

LE
I love threads like this in Arrse. I think somebody should print it out and hand to doley's just to show then what work can bring. I don't have much money, but I do have a comfortable lifestyle.

My only real regret is one I can do absolutely nothing about - I have no grandchildren. My daughter and her hubby can't have kids, which they knew before getting hitched and my son is a confirmed batchelor. Nowt I can do so just enjoy what I can, when I can and as often as I want.

Life is pretty good - touch wood! :)
I have no grand brats either and am chuffed to fuck about it, give me a hound any day. Late 50s mortgage free. SWMBO works four days a week so we live on her wage and mine goes into the savings pot. Just about to blow a few quid giving our camper van a bit of internal upgrade as we use it most weekends (well until the last 12 weeks). Enjoy life its far to short.
 
Me & her indoors don’t buy each other Birthday or Christmas presents as we just have what we want when we want it all year round.
Same with us - until the Covid thing hit, we had three nice breaks a year. Wedding Anniversary in Feb, my birthday in June, hers in October - we'd book a 3 or 4 day visit to somewhere one of us hadn't been before. The spacing was good and I'd normally squeeze in a skiing trip or two (if there was a deal to be had - the beauty of not working, deal pops up, go tomorrow).
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
i have a mortgage free house dont owe anyone a penny. Not Rich but just comfortable have ALL I need but now gone mental on buying stuff I want . ole age . huh
Better to enjoy it now than give it away when you‘re dead.
I‘m thinking about getting a wood lathe and all the toys to go with it probably looking at £1600 in all.
I’d rather use it than seeing it sat there, I’m a couple, well ,a few years younger than you mortgage free, what do they say, asset rich cash poor, that’s me but what cash I have I enjoy.
I save and then spend it, which is better than credit and that has always been my attitude to money.
SOD IT GO FOR IT AND ENJOY IT!!
 
Retired at 57, almost ten years ago now. Not wealthy but enough to get by on. No mortgage now obviously and a low maintenance pad to doss in.
Potter around most days without a care in the world.
Got four pensions now, state, Army plus two other occupational ones which I took at 60.
Got a new girlfriend who's a self sufficient schoolteacher in Germany. Haven't got to see each other since February but we're ok. I'm off out to Germany next month for an extended stay.
Am I in sod it mode? Fucking right. You only live once guys.
 
Life's a bitch and then you die.I'm 77 now,the more I can spend now,the less they can take off me when I end up in Home for the Befuddled.Spend it.
 
I've gone the other way. Working in a Bank, I'm acutely aware that my job may be precarious through a recession, so I'm currently being tighter than a Scotsman's sporran, the day before pay day, when it's his round.

I have savings, but intend to use them on a new house rather than unemployment.
Better save those bonuses!
 
I dont know if any arrsers have got soddit at all , well i'm 67 and for months now instead of figuring " do I need it ?" when buying stuff I tend to review it a bit then if I still fancy it Soddit and buy it . If I had saved my dosh during lockdown I d have a wee bit of a stash .

However today I decided to buy a Royal Anglian flag ( for breakfast club) , a chest pouch to carry my phone and keys ,( my back wont take a back pack as I got Spondulitus.) Then I bought a wee Bosch power spray coz I cant be Arrsed to even try to repair the old one which I 've had for ten years, it sprays water out from everywhere but the nozzles .

Gone from being careful to dont give a monkeys figuring that if i'm lucky i've got ten years left so a lot of stuff I'm buying is on the basis of " Soddit, it will see me out ."

Is it me ?

Just stopped me self from buying a new car in the last few weeks as mine is 10 years old but only has 37k on the clock 18 of which were on it when I bought it .
I think in ten years you managed to put as many miles on your vehicle that I used to get in a year pre COVID. I am utterly gobsmacked.
 
I think in ten years you managed to put as many miles on your vehicle that I used to get in a year pre COVID. I am utterly gobsmacked.


As tom jones says" Its not unusual" our 3 year old Ford has only done 3500 miles. Being now retired, its for local shopping runs, and the occasional visit to family. When working I would do 500 a week. I cannot be the only bloke who's use of his car has decreased since retiring.
 
Retired 12/13 years now, best job ever. Only been unemployed for a few months in my working life. Had to take some shitty jobs, as no trade or professional qualifications. Money was tight, especially when we decided on private schooling for the bairns. We believed a good education was a good start in life, says me who left school ASAP without even an o level. Mind you, I was lucky to have been educated in Scotland when their system was the envy of many. Mortgage paid, until this pandemic, we came and went as we liked. Not rolling in money, but not skint either. Like Gout Man we normally save for something, rather than credit. I naively thought because we weren't in debt, other than the mortgage, we would have a good credit rating!! It didn't make sense to me, you had to owe money to show your credit rating was good!? To us that showed bad financial management. On the whole our health isn't too bad. I'm still getting up a Munro or two whenever we head north, so at my age can't really complain. I'll take good health over any amount of money any day of the week.
 

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