SOCA boss quits, not bent, perish the thought.

#3
First came Operation Millipede

There is nothing like the certainty of being caught for prompting the correction of inexcusable oversights.

On retirement tomorrow I should be rationed to captions only on comments. Practising .....

Andrews Leaver Faults.
 
#4
How singularly unexpected that a senior copper suckles at the creamy teat of the private security industry.
 
#5
Soca is facing urgent questions over why it failed for years to tackle more than 100 blue-chip clients of corrupt private investigators, including law firms, banks and celebrities.
Explains why there is so much white collar crime going on...... Easy to get away with it particularly when you may have a high placed mole.
 
#6
There has been malicious speculation that SOCA have engaged in a whole variety of unlawful activities and tactics to get their man, and have accordingly had huge cases smashed apart and thrown out of court. The reason allegedly being given for dismissing one case in particular by the learned judge was that public confidence in the justice system would be irreparably damaged if the cases were allowed to continue. This is the worst kind of mindless speculation and is designed purely to harm the good name of that fine department. Further suggestions that one particularly large case got thrown out because the head of SOCA himself refused to answer a call to attend to defend his department's behaviour is wild imagination and completely without substance.

I'm not in the least bit surprised that this fine, upstanding gentleman has found cause to seek employment elsewhere, rather than continue in the face of such vile vilification.
 
#7
There has been malicious speculation that SOCA have engaged in a whole variety of unlawful activities and tactics to get their man, and have accordingly had huge cases smashed apart and thrown out of court. The reason allegedly being given for dismissing one case in particular by the learned judge was that public confidence in the justice system would be irreparably damaged if the cases were allowed to continue. This is the worst kind of mindless speculation and is designed purely to harm the good name of that fine department. Further suggestions that one particularly large case got thrown out because the head of SOCA himself refused to answer a call to attend to defend his department's behaviour is wild imagination and completely without substance.

I'm not in the least bit surprised that this fine, upstanding gentleman has found cause to seek employment elsewhere, rather than continue in the face of such vile vilification.
Did he not have a big stick to beat them with then?
 
#8
Hmmm,
A bloke that was a Senior Civil Servant all his life then something to do with Defence Estates, with no trace of anything to do with any law enforcement activities ends up at the head of SOCA.
They are not taking organized crime too seriously in this country still then?
 
#9
I would agree that SOCA has not been an outstanding success and that is probably why the National Crime Agency is being set up to tackle organised crime. But are you perhaps getting cofused about the respective roles of Sir Ian Andrews as Non-Executive Chair of the SOCA Board and Trevor Pearce QPM as Director General of SOCA?
 
#10
Nah. Not confused at all.
Why should anyone with nothing to do with law enforcement at all (ever) be in any role at all supervising what is alleged to be (and clearly is not) an organization dealing with serious and organized crime.
Non executive chair? What the fcuk was he responsible for then, fleet mileage and mobile phone bills?
Compare just one of what used to be called the Regional Crime Squads (and there were 9) and their results for one year with what SOCA has accomplished nationally in one year.
I can actually help with the figures if you are stuck.................
 
#11
Wasn't SOCA introduced by the last government to be the UK's version of the FBI? I'm quite sure that the NCA will follow on the tradition of it's predecessor and not quite work as advertised.
 
#13
Interesting info: Britain's FBI 'abandoned chasing crime Mr Bigs because it's too difficult' | Mail Online

SOCA as leaky as a colander and thoroughly infiltrated by drug barons. Didn't go after the biggest players because it was a bit too hard.

It's like the war on drugs, but with good guys all being PSCO's.

In 2009, the Great Gordon Brown (the blind leading the blind) said that SOCA was a failure, so why is it still there 4 years later, and as useless, corrupt and infiltrated as ever?

Gordon Brown steps in as agency fails to tackle organised crime gangs | UK news | The Guardian
 
#15
How singularly unexpected that a senior copper suckles at the creamy teat of the private security industry.
Good God, Sir.

Next you'll be suggesting that senior plod can retire to write columns for Murdoch rags, or go abroad and advise the Sunni leaders of a country how to more effectively slot their majority Shia population.

But crime is down, so be a team player and have that nice steaming cup of shut the **** up.

As for experience in policing, get real. I don't think I know anyone who got promoted for being a thief taker.

And the now-Invisible HMIC used to play Thomas the Tank Engine, but he can now tell us all what to do.

Experience, pah. Overrated mate.
 
#16
If you are interested this is how SOCA is run.

SOCA | How we are run

As I said I don't think its been a startling success, but I don't think you would find a competent senior police officer wanting to take on the role of chair of the board. Whether it is organised sensibly is another question, but it must be accountable to Ministers.
 
#17
Sir Ian Andrews was a career MOD civil servant who rapidly rose through the ranks and became CE/DE in the mid 1990s. He was also a Maj RE (V) but did regular service in Germany for a couple of years. He became 2nd PUS of the MOD in 2002 and retired in 2009 (and got his K) then became NED of SOCA. His wife also runs a very, very discreet corporate intelligence company.

He has no policing experience; he is principally a bureaucrat, although quite an effective one, IIRC
 
#18
To back up Crash - I had the privilege of working for Ian during his MOD time, and he is a thoroughly decent and straight bloke. And the point is that, from what I have heard on the grapevine, he got the SOCA job because he so outshone the assorted ACPO coppers who all blithely assumed that one of them would get the gig, because it would surely have to be given to a copper. Plod a plenty to actually conduct investigations, but why not have a sound bureaucrat at the top?

Very sad to see him go, brought down it would seem by a single misjudgement where, as I understand it, he went with the strict letter of the law, rather than the intended spirit.
 
#19
To back up Crash - I had the privilege of working for Ian during his MOD time, and he is a thoroughly decent and straight bloke. And the point is that, from what I have heard on the grapevine, he got the SOCA job because he so outshone the assorted ACPO coppers who all blithely assumed that one of them would get the gig, because it would surely have to be given to a copper. Plod a plenty to actually conduct investigations, but why not have a sound bureaucrat at the top?

Very sad to see him go, brought down it would seem by a single misjudgement where, as I understand it, he went with the strict letter of the law, rather than the intended spirit.
That matches my experience of him over a period of twenty or so years in different roles. He was one of the best and most effective senior civil servants I've come across. I'd trust his integrity far more than that of most in government senior posts.

Knowing him a little, I'm sure he'll be genuinely mortified to have made a mistake that caused him to have to bale out just a few weeks before the end for SOCA.
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
Perish the thought Ian Andrews was playing King Canute...

Blue-chip hackers may be named and shamed after Soca chief resigns - Telegraph

Britain’s organised crime fighting agency is under intense pressure to release the names of 100 blue-chip firms and individuals who used rogue investigators after the sudden resignation of its chairman.

Soca is facing questions over why it refused to name more than 100 blue-chip clients of corrupt investigators, who were involved in blagging, hacking and stealing private information.

Sir Ian’s resignation makes it more likely that a list of 102 companies that used rogue investigators, which was drawn up by Soca, will finally be released. He was seen by some MPs as the main obstacle to publication. The list includes 22 law firms, alongside several insurance companies, financial services groups and two celebrities.
Which would make the illegal hacking carried out by newspapers look relatively minor. We might even see several of the good and the great getting their collars felt...

Wordsmith
 
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