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So you go to the dump, and come back with stuff

A friend of mines youngest recons I'm the greenest person in the world because I've saved so much stuff from going into landfill my carbon footprint must be negative.
If you lived in Harrogate you'd get knack all. The tip Nazi's are convinced that once it's through the gates, it aquires the value of gold and must be protected at any cost. Normally by sticking it in the landfill skip and crushing it. The chances of someone else recycling and making use of it, is considerably more than their job's worth.
 
Ord Svcs Viersen, just down the road from JHQ, had a thing called Returned Stores Group (RSG) in one of the huge sh*ds. They used to receive in loadsa technical shiny things, some had been broken and were assessed for repair or disposal, other stuff had reached the end of its designated life, and some stuff was high value and just absolutely knacked but needed to be written off.

The Depot pikeys (the Army Fire Brigade/Service) used to go through the RSG skip almost every day. I am duty NCO one evening and my mucker from the Fire Brigade comes to the bunk and tells me to get over to the skip. I bimble over and see loadsa sealed greased waterproof packages laying in in the skip, loads of them. I clamber in and get a package open to find a brand new, still greased up Black & Decker drill - the original type from the 60's/70's that had the metal body. The Fire lads had hoiked away a load already, I got the Landy over and must have loaded up about 50 of them. I gave the Duty Officer a couple, passed them around in the German guard room and took the rest to my unit and hid them away to be used as gizzits and bribes.

Edit: Added Service to Fire Brigade.
 
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I could do the same with an old spectacles case.
Get some time in...
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You are truly "King of the Pikeys"!
The tales on here are mere amateurism, compared to the generation that went through WW2 and rationing. Cardboard tea packets opened flat and re-used as note paper, balls of random bits of string or rubber bands stuffed into random corners (you could never discard string, it was a cardinal sin) etc., etc.
 
If anyone hears or sees trailer suspension units or chassis going into tip or skip, please let me know...
 
Ord Svcs Viersen, just down the road from JHQ, had a thing called Returned Stores Group (RSG) in one of the huge sh*ds. They used to receive in loadsa technical shiny things, some had been broken and were assessed for repair or disposal, other stuff had reached the end of its designated life, and some stuff was high value and just absolutely knacked but needed to be written off.

The Depot pikeys (the Army Fire Brigade) used to go through the RSG skip almost every day. I am duty NCO one evening and my mucker from the Fire Brigade comes to the bunk and tells me to get over to the skip. I bimble over and see loadsa sealed greased waterproof packages laying in in the skip, loads of them. I clamber in and get a package open to find a brand new, still greased up Black & Decker drill - the original type from the 60's/70's that had the metal body. The Fire lads had hoiked away a load already, I got the Landy over and must have loaded up about 50 of them. I gave the Duty Officer a couple, passed them around in the German guard room and took the rest to my unit and hid them away to be used as gizzits and bribes.
the AFB at ER Long Marston became the FIRE service as it shut every day a massive bonfire
 
The tales on here are mere amateurism, compared to the generation that went through WW2 and rationing. Cardboard tea packets opened flat and re-used as note paper, balls of random bits of string or rubber bands stuffed into random corners (you could never discard string, it was a cardinal sin) etc., etc.
String, string, string's the thing,
Rope is thicker but string is quicker.
 
View attachment 514123 on the same trip I also recovered this lovely Georgian travelling chest, complete with keys, dated c 1810. It would have been covered in Pony skin.View attachment 514124
It needs a bit of work, but I was chuffed to recover both items from destruction.
You obviously attend a better class of tip that I do, the most up-market travel accessory I see is a bright yellow hard suitcase with busted hinges from too much stuffed in it....
 
The tales on here are mere amateurism, compared to the generation that went through WW2 and rationing. Cardboard tea packets opened flat and re-used as note paper, balls of random bits of string or rubber bands stuffed into random corners (you could never discard string, it was a cardinal sin) etc., etc.
Grandad on my mums side was in ship building, and was quite handy around the house. When Granny died I inherited a black cabinet about three feet high that used to be used as a plant stand, but inside were boxes and boxes of screw, still in the original cardboard boxes. At the back were packets of loose screws that were sorted into sizes and carefully stored in paper bags wrapped with rubber bands. On each bag was a hand written note of the size and number.

Growing up we had a tin box of loose screws which were saved from old furniture, something gets broken you take it apart and save the bits you can use so in the future if you need a screw for something out comes the tin and you sort through it until you find what you need. I still do that, which explains why every so often I get directed to reduce stock to a manageable level....
 

Kirkz

LE
Grandad on my mums side was in ship building, and was quite handy around the house. When Granny died I inherited a black cabinet about three feet high that used to be used as a plant stand, but inside were boxes and boxes of screw, still in the original cardboard boxes. At the back were packets of loose screws that were sorted into sizes and carefully stored in paper bags wrapped with rubber bands. On each bag was a hand written note of the size and number.

Growing up we had a tin box of loose screws which were saved from old furniture, something gets broken you take it apart and save the bits you can use so in the future if you need a screw for something out comes the tin and you sort through it until you find what you need. I still do that, which explains why every so often I get directed to reduce stock to a manageable level....
I have boxes and tins and jars full to bursting with screws, nails nuts, bolts washers and assorted odds and ends for exactly that purpose.
 

load_fin

War Hero
Walked past a skip recently, and some stuff jumped out at me:
3 x 1.2m sash clamps
1 x 1.8m sash clamps
(Alll loose and rattly; a short bead of weld fixed that)
A chop saw (cut 6 inches of cable off with a break in it, refixed the plug; good blade, cuts square)
A hand mite saw (donor parts for my broken one)
A floodlight (couple of bolts and a new plug bulb still working)
Two old powertool boxes (now holding formerly homeless power tools)


Best finds ever!
 

TamH70

MIA
I have boxes and tins and jars full to bursting with screws, nails nuts, bolts washers and assorted odds and ends for exactly that purpose.

I use the tins left when I've finished off my tins of posh Kenco Millicano Coffee for that purpose.
 
I estimate I have at least 8000 screws of the wrong size. Back to B+Q for a pack of 50 of which I use 12. When I croak they'll pay for the funeral from the scrappy weigh-in.
 

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