So whats a Crossed Belt?

#1
Some time ago, I was tasked to create a diversion in a conversation using this phrase, subsequently my ears bled, but was rewarded with many many beers, What pray did he mean, summat 'bout Mortars I seem to recall?
 
#4
Library_Soldier, hoping this is not a wah: there are plenty people here who know the answer but are feart to have their definition torn apart by other 81mm nazis on the site. It's simple enough and there may be a rush for the pamphlet when people get into work in the morning.
 
#5
Surely a "Cross Belt" is a belt that is worn by Rupert's (I think that the Light Division Seniors wear them also). It is worn across the shoulder and down the back (like a sash). It has a pouch, which is worn on the back, which was originally used for carrying dispatches. The pouch is now just for show.

(or have I missed the plot on this post?:( )
 
#6
quote="inkerman7492"]Surely a "Cross Belt" is a belt that is worn by Rupert's (I think that the Light Division Seniors wear them also). It is worn across the shoulder and down the back (like a sash). It has a pouch, which is worn on the back, which was originally used for carrying dispatches. The pouch is now just for show.

(or have I missed the plot on this post?:( )[/quote]

David Niven has an excellent description of what can be carried in them in The Moon's A Balloon whilst acting as Adjt's Stick, Condoms etc
 
#13
rabid spaniel said:
Library_Soldier said:
Hackle, no wah, noduff.
If you say so. In simplistic, splash, terms: one, three, two. Or two, one, three, etc etc.
LS, 'rabid spaniel' is quite right. NO WAH, Roger. If no-one else comes up with an even clearer answer I will get back to this.

On the other hand, it could be about "a belt that is worn by Ruperts" as previously suggested
 
#14
I can't believe that some officers have plastic versions! This was a sign of hard times in the late 80s and early 90s where savings had to be made. Shame on those who still wear them.
 
#15
A Cross Belt is also worn by Officers of the RA.

Mine is Brown Leather and goes from the right shoulder across the chest.

There is a pouch on the back which I was told was for musket ammo however it does make a handy mobile phone pouch.

Birddog
 
#17
6. Direction of Rotation. When a belt connecting two pulleys forms a single loop, it is called an open belt. If, however, it forms. a double loop, like a figure 8, it is called a crossed belt. Thus, in Fig. 2, the pulleys a and b are connected by an open belt, as are the pulleys c and d, while a crossed belt connects the pulleys e and f. Pulleys connected by open belts turn in the same direction, and those connected by crossed bells in opposite directions. If several belts are used between the first driver and last follower, these will turn in the same direction if there is no crossed belt, or if there is an even number of crossed belts, but in opposite directions If the number of crossed belts is odd.
 
#18
Birddog said:
A Cross Belt is also worn by Officers of the RA.

Mine is Brown Leather and goes from the right shoulder across the chest.

There is a pouch on the back which I was told was for musket ammo however it does make a handy mobile phone pouch.

Birddog
I thought that pouch at the back was for despatches.
musket ammo on the back in that small puch wouldn't be jery 'handy'
 
#19
rabid spaniel said:
Library_Soldier said:
Hackle, no wah, noduff.
If you say so. In simplistic, splash, terms: one, three, two. Or two, one, three, etc etc.
L_S

I think we've now covered most of the amusing answers to your quest for an explanation of the term "Crossed Belt".

You were right in thinking this is to do with mortars. Without attempting the pamphlet definition or current fire control procedures and the flexibility of this fine support weapon:

"Belt" refers to the belt, or pattern, of fire produced by two or more mortars deployed together and firing on the same fire mission. With each mortar firing at the same charge, elevation and bearing, the rounds should fall in a line corresponding to the layout of the mortar tubes. The time of flight is also identical, therefore the rounds should fall in the same right-to-left sequence as they were fired - eg one, two, three NOT one, three, two. "One" being the right hand tube and the first to fire.

A crossed belt occurs where the rounds fall out of right-to-left sequence, indicating a small variation in the "aiming" of at least one of the mortar tubes, so instead of parallel lines of flight, a round has crossed the path of another round. Without procedures designed to immediately detect and correct such an error, the fall of shot might appear acceptable in the initial engagement but the error factors will be dangerously multiplied when the same fire unit switches onto another target.
 

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