So, what you drinking?

My mother has Alzheimer’s. She resides in a specialist residential home. She’s in the general area at the moment but they have a specialist wing for the really advanced cases.

She knows who I am (I live 10 minutes up the road and see her frequently) but my sister who lives abroad was recently over and Mum couldn’t remember her name. She might see me today, but within 5 minutes (or maybe 5 seconds) of us parting she will not remember it.

The relevance for this thread, though, is that every Sunday I pick her up and we go to a pub in a converted station building on a still operating railway line. It’s a beautifully old fashioned place and full of old railway memorabilia. Mum loves it, and so enjoys our weekly “trainspotting” trips. As added value, my father (now long deceased) was a real railway buff and Mum loves the “connection” with Dad and his interest.

Plus the pub is a multiple CAMRA pub of the year winner and serves truly lovely beer. Win/win!
You're a good son.
 
I've discovered, after weekly (or so) visits to the local pub in the fishing village I frequent, that the darker the beer, the more likely I am to to suffer a gout attack in the following couple of days. This limits me to pilsner, which, I suppose, is ok, but I do like a good IPA or a bottle of strong real beer (Old Fart, Old Peculier, etc. Yet to test the Timothy Taylor Landlord this week.... ) Good thing whisky and rum are still on the menu; no ill-effects as far as I know, other than at low tide, when the ramp to my pontoon's uncivilly steep.
 
My mother has Alzheimer’s. She resides in a specialist residential home. She’s in the general area at the moment but they have a specialist wing for the really advanced cases.

She knows who I am (I live 10 minutes up the road and see her frequently) but my sister who lives abroad was recently over and Mum couldn’t remember her name. She might see me today, but within 5 minutes (or maybe 5 seconds) of us parting she will not remember it.

The relevance for this thread, though, is that every Sunday I pick her up and we go to a pub in a converted station building on a still operating railway line. It’s a beautifully old fashioned place and full of old railway memorabilia. Mum loves it, and so enjoys our weekly “trainspotting” trips. As added value, my father (now long deceased) was a real railway buff and Mum loves the “connection” with Dad and his interest.

Plus the pub is a multiple CAMRA pub of the year winner and serves truly lovely beer. Win/win!
My dad had Alzheimer's and the therapy we used was to take him out to a pub. He'd not remember what he'd eaten that evening but ask him about whether brother Francis had a secret porn stash when he was at school, or if he'd actually cycled from London to Liverpool in one ride for a bet when he was 19, he'd be full of stories about his youth as if was yesterday.

We'd come come from the pub and dad would say "mush dad, you're a damn good conversationalist, despite the fact that I'd spent most of the night listening to his stories from his youth.

And 10 minutes later he'd forgotten it all.

At least it meant the next time we went out we'd have exactly the same conversation again.
 
I've discovered, after weekly (or so) visits to the local pub in the fishing village I frequent, that the darker the beer, the more likely I am to to suffer a gout attack in the following couple of days. This limits me to pilsner, which, I suppose, is ok, but I do like a good IPA or a bottle of strong real beer (Old Fart, Old Peculier, etc. Yet to test the Timothy Taylor Landlord this week.... ) Good thing whisky and rum are still on the menu; no ill-effects as far as I know, other than at low tide, when the ramp to my pontoon's uncivilly steep.
Purines in yeast. Bottle and cask conditioned ales will contain some yeast. Ales are normally fermented with top fermenting yeast. Lagers use bottom fermenting yeast which tends to stay at the bottom of the fermentation vessel. Bottle conditioned lager will contain a little more yeast than typical bottled or keg lagers. Some brewers produce ale/lager hybrids. Cider should be okay other than the problem that it contains a lot more sugars than ale or lager so may not be so good for folk with a predisposition towards diabetes. Having said all that I thought I'd search for an article that discusses this very subject and found one. This article discusses exactly the issues you described. It also mentions that some gout sufferers seem to get by with medicine and a modest amount of ale or other beers.
Drinking Pains: Beer and Gout
 
Today I tasted this strange beverage

Maybe after a bottle of vodka it would be fine but today is purely beer drinking day.
I switched to Estonian Karl Friedrich

It is really fine - much better average level.
 
I've discovered, after weekly (or so) visits to the local pub in the fishing village I frequent, that the darker the beer, the more likely I am to to suffer a gout attack in the following couple of days. This limits me to pilsner, which, I suppose, is ok, but I do like a good IPA or a bottle of strong real beer (Old Fart, Old Peculier, etc. Yet to test the Timothy Taylor Landlord this week.... ) Good thing whisky and rum are still on the menu; no ill-effects as far as I know, other than at low tide, when the ramp to my pontoon's uncivilly steep.
Gout is a real bastard, but surely you know that.

Gout is caused by an accumulation of uric acid crystals - said to be pointy things - about various joints. Try this: eat a banana every day for a couple of weeks; either 'straight up' or sliced over morning cereal later try a couple of pints of darker beer. If you have no gout but you don't care that much for bananas, go to the chemist and buy a bottle of potassium supplements. I pop a 99mg tab each day and have been gout free for over a year.

Do whatever it takes to keep up with your beer intake!
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
I couldnt see this place mentioned in this thread, so thought i would add this link as a recommendation;

Lilleys Cider

I am a particular fan of the Mango Cider, which i can drink like juice. Which is unfortunate when you stand up as you find yourself falling over again very shortly afterwards...
If you are in the vicinity of Frome, you can pop into their shop and try each flavour - Colider (Cola flavoured Cider) is an odd concoction...
 
I was a fan of Bulmer's Perry, I believe the name was, or Peardrax, in the 1960s. It was sold in large, brown bottles with a heavy stone-type screw stopper.

Even though it was alcohol-free, I bought a bottle and took it back to the barracks. The very next day I went back to the off license to restock, buying an entire wooden crate full of the stuff.

I sometimes see pear cider here, in The Colonies, but it's horrible stuff.
 
I was a fan of Bulmer's Perry, I believe the name was, or Peardrax, in the 1960s. It was sold in large, brown bottles with a heavy stone-type screw stopper.

Even though it was alcohol-free, I bought a bottle and took it back to the barracks. The very next day I went back to the off license to restock, buying an entire wooden crate full of the stuff.

I sometimes see pear cider here, in The Colonies, but it's horrible stuff.
Peardrax was Whiteways.
 
Gout is a real bastard, but surely you know that.

Gout is caused by an accumulation of uric acid crystals - said to be pointy things - about various joints. Try this: eat a banana every day for a couple of weeks; either 'straight up' or sliced over morning cereal later try a couple of pints of darker beer. If you have no gout but you don't care that much for bananas, go to the chemist and buy a bottle of potassium supplements. I pop a 99mg tab each day and have been gout free for over a year.

Do whatever it takes to keep up with your beer intake!
In the spirit of research, last night, in company with a couple of yotties and the village mafia chieftain, I drank a great deal of ‘Corona’ beer; a particularly uninspiring but expensive and fashionable brew. I can see why the Spanish sleep at work during the day, but - no gout.
I had to educate the gangster on the foolishness of drinking from the bottle, though (do people think it makes them look hard, or cool, or something?), Northern Ireland’s not exempt from the possibility of Weil’s disease.
 
I couldnt see this place mentioned in this thread, so thought i would add this link as a recommendation;

Lilleys Cider

I am a particular fan of the Mango Cider, which i can drink like juice. Which is unfortunate when you stand up as you find yourself falling over again very shortly afterwards...
If you are in the vicinity of Frome, you can pop into their shop and try each flavour - Colider (Cola flavoured Cider) is an odd concoction...
Not as odd as Chilli flavor I have seen in some farms
 
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