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So we live in a democracy

#1
So after a select committee of MP's decide that this woman Maggie Atkinson was not suitable for the post of children's commissioner, Ed Balls has appointed her any way.

So that is the actions of a democracy is it. Seems to smack of the start of a dictatorship to me.
 
#3
On R4 the chairman of the committee described Balls as a bully who always wants his own way and is staffing his organisation with yes men.

Another thread has a petition to stop Blair becoming EU president, I think Balls has shown how much attention is paid by Labour to anything they don't want to do.
 
#9
The thing is now that New Labour have no talent left, they just dont have any one else to do the job, FFS who in their right mind would put a ******** like Balls ,Ainsworth,Johnson ect in any position of power unless they were desperate
 
#10
re-stilly said:
it's actually quite accurate, but as with any adaptation things are changed/omitted
Hmmm, whilst risking an almighty wah, I fear he may be refering to a somewhat more risque version of animal farm and whilst it may well involve pigs and horses I don't think Mr Orwell would put his name to this one.

On a more relevent note, Democracy? We currently live in a Nation that has a leader chosen by his mate, who just happened to be the outgoing leader, I might be a little hazy on the whole "democracy" meaning but I do know that whilst he is in power, to even mention the word is a joke.
 
#12
"So we live in a democracy"? What on Earth gave you that ridiculous idea?

Let's face it, folks. Representative democracy is an outdated relic of an era when most people were illiterate, the ruling elite thought they were a different breed from the rest, the nation's money was concentrated in a very few hands and it took days to travel from one end of the country to another due to the shocking state of the roads and appalling transport infrastructure.

Oh.
 
#13
duckula said:
re-stilly said:
it's actually quite accurate, but as with any adaptation things are changed/omitted
Hmmm, whilst risking an almighty wah, I fear he may be refering to a somewhat more risque version of animal farm and whilst it may well involve pigs and horses I don't think Mr Orwell would put his name to this one.

On a more relevent note, Democracy? We currently live in a Nation that has a leader chosen by his mate, who just happened to be the outgoing leader, I might be a little hazy on the whole "democracy" meaning but I do know that whilst he is in power, to even mention the word is a joke.
Duhhhh. :oops: My excuse it is Monday
 
#14
No we are ruled by hidden faces in Europe.
Party politics is now meaningless.
We no longer live in a democracy.
Those that died in two world wars for us died completely in vain.
Shame on us.
 
#15
Chef said:
On R4 the chairman of the committee described Balls as a bully who always wants his own way and is staffing his organisation with yes men.
That would be the same Balls who fancies himself as the next Labour leader then? The same Balls who was a protege of Gordon Brown at the Treasury, and appears to have learned everything he knows about management style from his mentor...
 
#16
flibbertigibbet said:
Chef said:
On R4 the chairman of the committee described Balls as a bully who always wants his own way and is staffing his organisation with yes men.
That would be the same Balls who fancies himself as the next Labour leader then? The same Balls who was a protege of Gordon Brown at the Treasury, and appears to have learned everything he knows about management style from his mentor...
How very dare you?
Really. You cannot use words like management in the same sentence as the name Gordon Brown.
That would imply the cnut has some vague idea of how to run anything more complex than a Scalectrix
 
#17
My friends, I must tell you that a Socialist policy is abhorrent to the British ideas of freedom. Although it is now put forward in the main by people who have a good grounding in the Liberalism and Radicalism of the early part of this century, there can be no doubt that Socialism is inseparably interwoven with Totalitarianism and the abject worship of the State. It is not alone that property, in all its forms, is struck at, but that liberty, in all its forms, is challenged by the fundamental conceptions of Socialism.

Look how even to-day they hunger for controls of every kind, as if these were delectable foods instead of war-time inflictions and monstrosities. There is to be one State to which all are to be obedient in every act of their lives. This State is to be the arch-employer, the arch-planner, the arch-administrator and ruler, and the archcaucus boss.

How is an ordinary citizen or subject of the King to stand up against this formidable machine, which, once it is in power, will prescribe for every one of them where they are to work; what they are to work at; where they may go and what they may say; what views they are to hold and within what limits they may express them; where their wives are to go to queue-up for the State ration; and what education their children are to receive to mould their views of human liberty and conduct in the future?

A Socialist State once thoroughly completed in all its details and its aspects – and that is what I am speaking of – could not afford to suffer opposition. Here in old England, in Great Britain, of which old England forms no inconspicuous part, in this glorious Island, the cradle and citadel of free democracy throughout the world, we do not like to be regimented and ordered about and have every action of our lives prescribed for us. In fact we punish criminals by sending them to Wormwood Scrubs and Dartmoor, where they get full employment, and whatever board and lodging is appointed by the Home Secretary.

Socialism is, in its essence, an attack not only upon British enterprise, but upon the right of the ordinary man or woman to breathe freely without having a harsh, clumsy, tyrannical hand clapped across their mouths and nostrils. A Free Parliament – look at that – a Free Parliament is odious to the Socialist doctrinaire. Have we not heard Mr. Herbert Morrison descant upon his plans to curtail Parliamentary procedure and pass laws simply by resolutions of broad principle in the House of Commons, afterwards to be left by Parliament to the executive and to the bureaucrats to elaborate and enforce by departmental regulations? As for Sir Stafford Cripps on “Parliament in the Socialist State,” I have not time to read you what he said, but perhaps it will meet the public eye during the election campaign.

But I will go farther. I declare to you, from the bottom of my heart, that no Socialist system can be established without a political police. Many of those who are advocating Socialism or voting Socialist to-day will be horrified at this idea. That is because they are short-sighted, that is because they do not see where their theories are leading them.

No Socialist Government conducting the entire life and industry of the country could afford to allow free, sharp, or violently-worded expressions of public discontent. They would have to fall back on some form of Gestapo, no doubt very humanely directed in the first instance. And this would nip opinion in the bud; it would stop criticism as it reared its head, and it would gather all the power to the supreme party and the party leaders, rising like stately pinnacles above their vast bureaucracies of Civil servants, no longer servants and no longer civil. And where would the ordinary simple folk – the common people, as they like to call them in America – where would they be, once this mighty organism had got them in its grip?

I stand for the sovereign freedom of the individual within the laws which freely elected Parliaments have freely passed. I stand for the rights of the ordinary man to say what he thinks of the Government of the day, however powerful, and to turn them out, neck and crop, if he thinks he can better his temper or his home thereby, and if he can persuade enough others to vote with him.

But, you will say, look at what has been done in the war. Have not many of those evils which you have depicted been the constant companions of our daily life? It is quite true that the horrors of war do not end with the fighting-line. They spread far away to the base and the homeland, and everywhere people give up their rights and liberties for the common cause. But this is because the life of their country is in mortal peril, or for the sake of the cause of freedom in some other land. They give them freely as a sacrifice. It is quite true that the conditions of Socialism play a great part in war-time. We all submit to being ordered about to save our country. But when the war is over and the imminent danger to our existence is removed, we cast off these shackles and burdens which we imposed upon ourselves in times of dire and mortal peril, and quit the gloomy caverns of war and march out into the breezy fields, where the sun is shining and where all may walk joyfully in its warm and golden rays.

Winston Churchill 1945
 
#19
smartascarrots said:
IIRC correctly, Winston opposed Indian independence? He had a very interesting idea of what 'freedom' meant.

WIth hindsight, he was right, they were not ready for it… chaos, million skilled in ethnic cleansing and Pakistan became a basket case run by the extremists rather than a functioning democracy.
 
#20
jagman said:
flibbertigibbet said:
Chef said:
On R4 the chairman of the committee described Balls as a bully who always wants his own way and is staffing his organisation with yes men.
That would be the same Balls who fancies himself as the next Labour leader then? The same Balls who was a protege of Gordon Brown at the Treasury, and appears to have learned everything he knows about management style from his mentor...
How very dare you?
Really. You cannot use words like management in the same sentence as the name Gordon Brown.
That would imply the cnut has some vague idea of how to run anything more complex than a Scalectrix
You are quite right, apologies. Balls appears to have learned everything he knows about throwing mobile phones at the wall from Gordon Brown.