So Shoplifting merely merits a Caution ??

#1
Link

Sorry its the Sun, and I don't care about the "personalities" involved

My point is - since when does an £800 theft merit nothing but a caution ??
 
#2
It should demand a stiffer penalty but clearly the Can't Prosecute Service don't think so. They make the decisions on charging or cautions on these types of offence.

Thought I'd get that in before the plod bashing starts.

edited to add.

Bearing in mind that a bloke can burgle a boatload of houses and won't get more than a referal order or "community punishment". This should come as no surprise to anyone.
 
#3
Surely , even from a CPS point of view - its a surefire winner. They were arrested and admitted guilt, hence one more box ticked, and another target met ??
 
#4
The_Seagull said:
It should demand a stiffer penalty but clearly the Can't Prosecute Service don't think so. They make the decisions on charging or cautions on these types of offence.

Thought I'd get that in before the plod bashing starts.

edited to add.

Bearing in mind that a bloke can burgle a boatload of houses and won't get more than a referal order or "community punishment". This should come as no surprise to anyone.
With that level of support I wonder how you motivate yourself to carry on doing the job? I'd be banging my head against the wall in frustration. :x
 
#5
RABC said:
Surely , even from a CPS point of view - its a surefire winner. They were arrested and admitted guilt, hence one more box ticked, and another target met ??
They still get both, without the need of court time mate. Plod get their detection too. Everyones a winner.
 
#6
Ord_Sgt said:
The_Seagull said:
It should demand a stiffer penalty but clearly the Can't Prosecute Service don't think so. They make the decisions on charging or cautions on these types of offence.

Thought I'd get that in before the plod bashing starts.

edited to add.

Bearing in mind that a bloke can burgle a boatload of houses and won't get more than a referal order or "community punishment". This should come as no surprise to anyone.
With that level of support I wonder how you motivate yourself to carry on doing the job? I'd be banging my head against the wall in frustration. :x
I felt like that for the 1st year, then it just wears you down and you just try your best to do the best from your end, and prepare for the inevitable disappointment.

Though once, in a blue moon, your faith is restored by a surprise result.
 
#7
RABC said:
Link

Sorry its the Sun, and I don't care about the "personalities" involved

My point is - since when does an £800 theft merit nothing but a caution ??
Since the prisons were full and apparently they dont work anyway.

"Tough on crime, tough on the causes......."

Bollox.
 
#9
What we are seeing more of where I work Is "Restorative Justice". Basically the theif gets to give a not very sincere apology then they are sent on their way. As they walk out of store we film with beaming smiles or just outright laughing........ Justice is served.
 
#10
“A caution represents an admission of guilt and forms part of a criminal record. " So no doubt they did it, a caution is all well & good for a schoolkid stealing a bit of make-up or sweets. But 2 Adults who are in their 50's that ridiculous they should get something more serious like Community service or a fine that reflects the value of the goods plus court costs. I hope M&S and Tesco have gone for civil recovery.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#11
if you havent already, can I recommend the books 'wasting police time' and 'perverting the course of justice' by pc. copperfield and inspector gadget respectively - their blogs (which the books sprang from) are always excellent reading too - indeed Gadget's has a number of points to make about public disorder that are eerily relevant considering the rumblings on all sides re next week with the G20 malarkey going on...
 
#12
JTs mum, class looking bird. How has she had all the life sucked out of her? How does one look that old and haggered while not being that old? There, slagged her off, feel much better now, justice has been served. Next.
 
#13
PandaLOVE said:
How has she had all the life sucked out of her?
She looks at least ten to 15 years older doesn't she? More like 65 or 70 than 50-odd. She reminds me of a Les Dawson character.
The Mrs reckons she's probably been a 40 per day smoker all her life, and has been hitting the old sunbed a bit too hard.
 
#14
RABC said:
@Seagull - I despair for you . How many times do you wonder why you bother ??
Quite regularly, though not so much anymore as I'm older, wiser, and on a specialist uniform department where I get to be out and about on the front line without too much of the paperwork and CPS bullsh!te.
 
#15
#16
western said:
The_Seagull said:
Quite regularly, though not so much anymore as I'm older, wiser, and on a specialist uniform department where I get to be out and about on the front line without too much of the paperwork and CPS bullsh!te.
So this was down to you then? :)

http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/w...e-apologise-for-mistaken-raid-91466-23251461/

or this?

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2009/mar/28/hanging-rope-suicide
Not guilty, that'd be the cowboys from South Wales. :lol:
 
#17
There was me thinking you were all one big happy ethnic minority.
 
#18
what I really don't understand is why punishments really don't "fit" the crime by first and formost putting right the damage that has been done.

If I steal/damage £800 worth of goods, the police spend 20 man hours investigating it and the CPS spend time&money prosecuting me then why don't I, the criminal, foot the bill for all that if I am found guilty?

damage/theft + police costs +CPS costs = what I pay as a fine.

If i can't afford that then I can do enough unpaid labour (at minimum wage rates) to pay off the bill.....



Any punative or reformative measures can be put on top of this...
 
#19
The_Seagull said:
It should demand a stiffer penalty but clearly the Can't Prosecute Service don't think so. They make the decisions on charging or cautions on these types of offence.

Thought I'd get that in before the plod bashing starts.

edited to add.

Bearing in mind that a bloke can burgle a boatload of houses and won't get more than a referal order or "community punishment". This should come as no surprise to anyone.
It's not just the Cnut's Protection Service who are soft as sh1t; in Scotland their equivelent is the Procurator Fiscal. And the "punishment" for a shoplifter up here is a fixed-penality notice of £40. :evil:

But then the SNP does'nt even try to claim that they are tough on crime: they make the average Guardian reader look like Judge Dredd... :x
 
#20
maguire said:
if you havent already, can I recommend the books 'wasting police time' and 'perverting the course of justice' by pc. copperfield and inspector gadget respectively
Also well worth a read is 'A Land Fit For Criminals' by David Frazer.

He's a recently retired probation officer who describes what happens to criminals after the police, CPS and courts have finished with them. Weep with joy as you read of heroin addicts who are paroled from prison with a £150 grant and, funnily enough, fail to turn up at the bail hostel, probation office etc.

Don't worry about the shoplifters. I believe in some places you don't even get a caution, just an £80 spot fine for nicking up to £250 worth of goods. You do the maths.

Worry more about the fact that most criminal offences are now dealt with by a caution. IIRC that includes 300+ rapes and over 1000 child sex offences that never saw the inside of a court last year.
 

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