Snoopers Charter - Worrying? Or required?

#1
https://www.liberty-human-rights.org.uk/campaigns/no-snoopers-charter/no-snoopers-charter.php

I admit, this does sound a bit "The government is out to get me, fetch my tin hat", but.... And, even as someone intending to join the Intelligence corps, where having access to this level of information would be useful I'd assume... This kind of thing scares the hell out of me all the same.

Does anyone think that this legislation is needed? Do you think its a good idea, or deeply concerning/detrimental? Or are you donning your tin foil hat and running to the hills naked to live away in isolation from the scary men?

----

This "Snooper's Charter" (The Communications Data Bill) could build up a complete list of things you've been looking at online, who you text, who you ring, where you've been. This can build up a worryingly intimate insight into your life - your health, your political views, your contacts, your movements at any given time. The technology required to do this is also potentially capable of capturing the content of these messages, not just the times/who they've been sent to. Starting to get worried yet?

This violates Article 8 of the Human Rights act; The right to privacy. For example - would you happily have a CCTV camera installed in your bedroom, in your house...? Thought not. As this is essentially what this amounts to.

I, like Liberty, don't see the problem with communications being monitored to prevent a crime, or during an investigation of a crime. Blanket monitoring of the entire population however, is incredibly unnerving. This turns a nation of citizens into a nation of suspects for starters.

Do you trust government to use this information? I don't, they've proven before they can't keep hold of information securely. Do I think its needed? No. Systems are already in place to intercept/monitor criminals. Do I think this is bordering on 1984's world, and something that would be horrendously damaging to personal freedom? Yes.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#2
We were warned a long time ago about such things but, my Internet has been broke for a week. If they want to snoop what I've been looking at, good luck to them.
 
#4
Suspect so. Its been floating around since 08, 09 in some different forms, which means I suspect it'd not die even if this got stopped. It'd still come back in a slightly different form in a few years.

Potential for blackmail would be massive mind. Having access to a 100 peoples entire email, text, and phone call conversation information? And individuals in government departments being corrupt enough to pass information on would not surprise me. Not enough safeguards in place really.
 
T

Tremaine

Guest
#8
This bit: "It represents a shift from targeted monitoring of future communications on the basis of individual suspicion to the indiscriminate stockpiling of private data to be used by public agencies for a future unspecified purpose". In other words, collect and keep anything and everything on everybody. For no good reason other than the delectation of your average nosy bastard. Course, they will look after it all nicely, and they won't sell it. Barry won't sell it on EBay and Fat Rita won't be laughing at it in the Ladies.

We're to accept that private companies will have our data. Stinking, civvy, agencies. Normally this shouldn't be an issue, except this is UK, with the world's biggest fucktards in our agencies and councils. And just look at what works in Westminster. The RIP Bill was introduced back in 2000, when these things started, and it could only have got worse. Interesting to see we're even behind Germany in this privacy and constitutional stuff. Germany FFS.

It's enough to make you take your barbecued eggs down the shed and reach for the SLR.
 
#9
Nothing at all to worry about:

The day is coming when . . .
>
> Operator: "Thank you for calling Pizza Hut. May I have your..."
>
> Customer: "Hi, I'd like to order."
>
> Operator: "May I have your NIDN first, sir?"
> Customer: "My National ID Number, yeah, hold on, eh, it's 6102049998-45-54610."
>
> Operator: "Thank you, Mr. Sheehan. I see you live at 1742 Meadowland Drive, and the phone number's 494-2366.
Your office number over at Lincoln Insurance is 745-2302 and your cell number's 266-2566.
> Which number are you calling from, sir?"
>
Customer: "Huh? I'm at home. Where d'ya get all this information?"
>
> Operator: "We're wired into the system, sir. I knew the number you were calling from - just checking you out for
lying."
>
> Customer: (Sighs) "Oh, well, I'd like to order a couple of your All-Meat Special pizzas..."
>
> Operator: "I don't think that's a good idea, sir."
>
> Customer: "Whaddya mean?"
>
> Operator: "Sir, your medical records indicate that you've got very high blood pressure and extremely high cholesterol. Your
National Health Care provider won't allow such an unhealthy choice."
>
> Customer: "Damn! What do you recommend, then?"
>
Operator: "You might try our low-fat Soybean Yogurt Pizza. I'm sure you'll like it."
>
> Customer: "What makes you think I'd like something like that?"
>
> Operator: "Well, you checked out 'Gourmet Soybean Recipes' from your local library last week, sir. That's
why I made the suggestion."
>
> Customer: "All right, all right. Give me two family-sized ones,then.
> What's the damage?"
>
>
Operator: "That should be plenty for you, your wife and your four kids,sir. The 'damage,' as you put it, heh, heh, comes $49.99."
>
>
Customer: "Lemme give you my credit card number."
>
> Operator: "I'm sorry sir, but I'm afraid you'll have to pay in cash.Your credit card balance is over its limit."
>
> Customer: "I'll run over to the ATM and get some cash before your drivergets here."
>

> Operator: "That won't work either, sir. Your checking account's overdrawn."
>
> Customer: "Never mind. Just send the pizzas. I'll have the cash ready. How long will it take?"
>
> Operator:
"We're running a little behind, sir. It'll be about 45 minutes, sir. If you're in a hurry you might want to pick 'em up while you're out getting the cash, but carrying pizzas on a motorcycle can be a little awkward."
>
> Customer: "How the hell do you know I'm riding a bike?"
>
Operator: "It says here you're in arrears on your car payments,so your car got repo'ed. But your Harley's paid up, so I just
assumed that you'd be using it."
>
> Customer:
"@#%/$@&?#!"
>
> Operator: "I'd advise watching your language, sir. You've already got aJuly 2006 conviction for cussing out a
cop."
>
> Customer: (Speechless)
>
> Operator: "Will there be anything else, sir?"
>
> Customer: "No, nothing. Oh yeah, don't forget the two free liters of Coke your ad says I get with the pizzas."
>
> Operator: "I'm sorry sir, but our ad's exclusionary clause prevents us from offering free soda to diabetics
 
#10
Was Orwell the Nostradamus of the 20th Century?

“Big Brother is Watching You.” The “Party” has taken over all aspects of life and is intent on eradicating individuality.
 
#11
Meh…

The Government seriously doesn't have a clue how this internets thing works.

Look at the blocking of Piratebay at ISP level.

Took all of 30 seconds to get round that one.
 
#12
**** 'em, let the snivvely snotty snoopers do what they want, proly beating their bishops while they snoop, I say again **** 'em.

( awaits knock on door )
 
#13
MPs might not understand the interwebs. Some civil servants might not as well.

Spooks, and telecomms companies on the other hand.... That said, most of the companies are flatly against it last time I checked. Too much chance for misuse, for theft, for blackmail, too much surveillance. For very little gain - technically speaking, anyway. Unless you want to know how many of the male population look at porn, I guess.
 
#14
MPs might not understand the interwebs. Some civil servants might not as well.

Spooks, and telecomms companies on the other hand.... That said, most of the companies are flatly against it last time I checked. Too much chance for misuse, for theft, for blackmail, too much surveillance. For very little gain - technically speaking, anyway. Unless you want to know how many of the male population look at porn, I guess.

All of them?

So problem resolved and we can all get on with important stuff now?
 
#15
All this snooping can already be done.
Must be sanctioned by the high heed yin.
But the technology exists to snoop on anyone we like.
Via phone, mobile or internet.

If you have nothing to hide then whats the problem?
 

TheIronDuke

ADC
Book Reviewer
#16
We were warned a long time ago about such things but, my Internet has been broke for a week.
I feel your pain Bro. While you have been away I have put your name on a $72,500,000 loan for the waterfront condo development in the Florida Keys we discussed. Your dog features on the website home page. You will love it. My people will be in touch when you fix your phone.

Thanks for the invite for lunch next Sunday but lets see how the weather pans out? Laters.
 
#19
How the **** will they 'Police' pre-paid sim cards in 'phones & dongles?
A/ Ban them.

B/ Make you produce your national ID card (did you think they had forgotten about these?) when buying one.


Pick one.
 
#20
So, someone must be behind or making the case for the new legislation. Is it perhaps ACPO or someone similar? with a "This will help us to capture more criminals and prevent terrorism and if it saves one life etc." type of logic.
 

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