Sneak preview of British Army Top Trumps card

#1
2 RGR is in the forthcoming Top Trumps "Fighting Units of the British Army" pack - but how do they rate vs other Units? :wink: Sneak preview below:

(for every pack sold, the manufacturers are making a donation to charity)
 

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#4
Ratty22 said:
So where may I purchase same?

Do tell.

Ratty 22
Should be available in WH Smith, Woolies, Tesco, Amazon, National Army Museum - most places which already sell Top Trumps in fact. If not in stock now then they willbe over next couple of weeks.

In BFG, PRIs and NAAFI will have them in.

TTFN

Tenere
 
#5
FaceLikeAPingPongBall said:
do you automatically lose if you have RLC & AGC?
My Bold not if you do battle on Manpower! Or even in some cases for VCs either however if you have a RLC or AGC card keep them safe as they are not included in the original 30 so will be a collectors item :wink:
 
#6
FaceLikeAPingPongBall said:
do you automatically lose if you have RLC & AGC?
Interesting one. If you took them out of a situation, say Iraq, would you automatically loose? It would be interesting to see how long you could sustain for :D
 
#7
Think your founding year is wrong, old boy. Sorry. Gurkhas didn't become part of the British (well, Indian at the time) Army until 1816 (ish). They had a war with the Brits from 1814-1816 and from this stems the strong bond between the British Army and the Gurkhas.
 
#8
The_Goon said:
Think your founding year is wrong, old boy. Sorry. Gurkhas didn't become part of the British (well, Indian at the time) Army until 1816 (ish). They had a war with the Brits from 1814-1816 and from this stems the strong bond between the British Army and the Gurkhas.
Perhaps they were formed from a body of men that were in existence before then.

In the same way that the senior infantry regiments were in existence before the Army's offical founding date of 1660.
 
#9
The_Goon said:
Think your founding year is wrong, old boy. Sorry. Gurkhas didn't become part of the British (well, Indian at the time) Army until 1816 (ish). They had a war with the Brits from 1814-1816 and from this stems the strong bond between the British Army and the Gurkhas.
Figures were obtained from two sources: MOD and the Units themselves. Founding dates (of Unit or earliest antecedent), No of VCs and No of Battle Honours were all provided by Units. 2 RGR have described their earliest antecedent as the 10th Madras Native Infantry founded in 1776.
 
#13
BaldricksBullet said:
MoD

Established : 1971, but reorganised due to inefficiency 1974, 1977, 1981, 1984, 1987, 1991, 1998, 2002, 2005

Manpower (working): 0

VC's: 1 less than Idi Amin

Battle honours: 0

NOW THIS IS THE COLLECTORS CARD I WANT
wasnt amin VC AND BAR? seem to remember he awarded himself two
 
#14
It seems that the 'Sun's' editorial staff have got involved with the production of these cards what with 2 RGR being referred to as "elite"!!!

PS. It is interesting that the other senior bravery awards such as the QGM, GM and MC are not included (but I guess that would have given the RLC too much of an advantage)!
 
#18
Hey

In the Sunday Times:

Army finds winning hearts is child's playChristina Lamb
IT might be a children’s card game but it has exercised some of the top minds of the British Army for months and had commanding officers of prestigious regiments bickering over which “out-trumps” the other.

The first British Army version of Top Trumps, one of Britain’s most popular card games, is the brainchild of an army doctor working with the wives of soldiers serving in Afghanistan. The packs go on sale this week with the royalties from each one sold going to help to build schools in Afghanistan.

“We were all hearing in letters and e-mails from our husbands about these children with no classrooms, just sitting on the dirt, and living with no water, electricity or toys,” said Caroline Richards, whose husband General David Richards was commander of the Nato forces in Afghanistan until February. “We wanted to do something too.”

To start with the women’s contributions to the hearts and minds campaign was small scale, including a sponsored run, cake sale and plant sales. But with Afghanistan defined as one of the world’s poorest countries, the women wanted to do more.


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It was then that Dr John Ross, GP on the Rheindalen base in Germany and father of a seven-year-old boy, came up with the idea of trumps, a game which is experiencing a renaissance in school playgrounds. “I was looking round my son’s room and noticed the trumps cards,” said Ross. “I thought: every small boy goes through an army phase - what about an army set?”

Trumps cards sets are based on a theme such as dinosaurs or European footballers and each card has a list of six statistics with which players try to trump each other. Although there have been sets on warships and military jets, there has not been one on Britain’s armed forces.

“I thought it was a great idea,” said Caroline Richards. But she had reckoned without the bureaucrats at the Ministry of Defence (MoD) who muttered darkly about intellectual property. She decided that the only answer was to deploy her own lethal weapon - her husband.

“I pointed out that it’s a great opportunity to enthuse boys about the army,” said David Richards. “The MoD wanted to put in all sorts of caveats, but I said: don’t be childish, it’s a game.”

Even so it has taken almost a year to get the MoD licence to use regiments’ names, badges, mottos and photographs. The biggest hurdles were choosing which regiments to include and which criteria to judge them on.

Ross whittled his way down to 70 units, but a set of trumps has only 30 cards. In the end he decided to send a draft out to the commanders of all 70, then choose through a combination of first-come first-served and trying to be representative.

The first four criteria were easy: Ross chose year founded (although this was made more complex because units have been amalgamated), fighting strength, Victoria Crosses (VCs) won and battle honours.

The Grenadier Guards, currently serving in Afghanistan, trump all others on year founded, dating from 1656. Top for manpower is the Royal Horse Artillery, while the Duke of Lan-caster’s Regiment has the most VCs. A number of regiments, including the Parachute Regiment and 16 Regiment Royal Artillery, vie for battle honours.

Deciding on the final two categories was more controversial. Eventually they agreed on firepower, whereby regiments with large guns and tanks come out top - so the Army Air Corps trump all others. Last is combat versatility. In this, nobody beats the SAS.

“The vast majority are very happy to take part because of regimental pride,” said Richards. “But there have been problems like some obscure regiment having the same combat power as the Paras, which didn’t go down well, so there has been a lot of smoothing of feathers.”

- Sunday Times readers can claim an exclusive free Super Top Trumps card by printing cutting out this paragraph and sending it, with a stamped self-addressed envelope to: British Army STT Offer, PO Box 2575, Marlborough SN8 3ZR.

Conditions at www.timesonline.co.uk/uknews
 
#20
I know this is dragging up an old thread but having bought a pack of these for HLM juniors I was wondering what happened to the other Regts' cards that don't feature in the final 30? I have seen a card for one of the REME Bns but don't know where it came from.
 

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