snake bites

#1
I just found out that vipers live in an area where we are planning to move to.
How do you keep yourself safe from snakes, are there any anti-snake devices? What do you do in case of a snake bite?
 
#3
Oh pity.... Saw this thread and started to salivate about my teen years, lager and cider 50/50...... I feel another midlife crisis looming..... I wonder what Julie is doing nowadays the cheap slut.....
 
#4
British vipers? Rarely any size at all, more die from bee and wasp stings in the mouth causing breathing obstruction. Bits of the South West of Scotland are rotten with them. I've come very close to stepping on one, saw a guy step on one and get nipped in the Scouts when I was a kid. Saw one that had been run over and it was a good three and half feet, maybe more, which is huge.

Local dogs were killed in an area where me and my pals played for years and never saw one.

Basically, anywhere providing loads of intricate cover is "snakey", but British adders love to bask because the weather generally is pretty crap, but they can't get too hot either, so look at it from the snakes point of view - when the place starts to cool at the end of the day, or heat at the start, which bits stay warmest or get warmest - dark paths and stones at the end or the start of the day to heat up and moderate cover once warm enough. Don't put your hand into anything you can't see. European snakes are non-aggressive. It's your dog you need to worry about, and little kids.
 
#5
Sluice_dweller said:
Domovoy said:
I just found out that vipers live in an area where we are planning to move to.
How do you keep yourself safe from snakes, don't move there!

are there any anti-snake devices? no idea, try google

what do you do in case of a snake bite?Try and identify the snake and go to A&E as soon as possible
1. We already bought a house.
2. Tried. It came up with Army Humor and not much more.
3. You, people, go to all sorts of places, surely you know of something that can be done before you reach A&E, apart from the usual: keep a bite below a heart level, apply pressure around the wound...
 
#7
The Americans had about eight people killed by snakebite during the entire Pacific campaigns in WW2, and those were a) nasty b***** snakes, and b) hundreds of thousands of people diving into deep cover all day.

Snakes want to eat, and that means a rat, that's all. The reason that snakes are non-aggressive is because the aggressive ones got smacked to bits and didn't pass on their genes. There was a kid in the South of England who managed to get himself bitten by doing a Steve Irwin and picking the snake up - he was about 11, this was not a dry bite (most are) and all he had to show for it was a night in hospital and a big forearm!

The worst thing you can do is worry, because if the worst happens you will communicate that to the victim, and the hullaballoo might put them into shock, which could cause them more problems than the bite.

Seriously, watch your hounds, apart from that don't worry. Bottles to apply over a bite and possibly pump out the fluid surrounding it can be purchased, but really Africa and some parts of the US are where to worry - type "rattlesnake round up" into google if you want something to worry about. :)
 
#8
gobbyidiot said:
British vipers? Rarely any size at all, more die from bee and wasp stings in the mouth causing breathing obstruction. Bits of the South West of Scotland are rotten with them. I've come very close to stepping on one, saw a guy step on one and get nipped in the Scouts when I was a kid. Saw one that had been run over and it was a good three and half feet, maybe more, which is huge.

Local dogs were killed in an area where me and my pals played for years and never saw one.

Basically, anywhere providing loads of intricate cover is "snakey", but British adders love to bask because the weather generally is pretty crap, but they can't get too hot either, so look at it from the snakes point of view - when the place starts to cool at the end of the day, or heat at the start, which bits stay warmest or get warmest - dark paths and stones at the end or the start of the day to heat up and moderate cover once warm enough. Don't put your hand into anything you can't see. European snakes are non-aggressive. It's your dog you need to worry about, and little kids.
It's Balkan viper (Vipera ammodytes). Apparently unpredictable and very venomous...
 
#10
gobbyidiot said:
The worst thing you can do is worry, because if the worst happens you will communicate that to the victim, and the hullaballoo might put them into shock, which could cause them more problems than the bite.
That sounds like me. I can keep presence of mind where strangers are concerned, but when my family members are in trouble I can easily go into a panic mode... Not good.

Thanks for your reassurance.
 
#13
Domovoy said:
I just found out that vipers live in an area where we are planning to move to.
How do you keep yourself safe from snakes, are there any anti-snake devices? What do you do in case of a snake bite?
I don't know but I just got stung by a fcuking wasp and it's bloody throbbing (my thumb not the wasp).
 
#14
jack-daniels said:
Domovoy said:
I just found out that vipers live in an area where we are planning to move to.
How do you keep yourself safe from snakes, are there any anti-snake devices? What do you do in case of a snake bite?
I don't know but I just got stung by a fcuking wasp and it's bloody throbbing (my thumb not the wasp).
Kill the wasp. It helps psychologically wise. :)
 
#15
i moved to ireland no snakes st patrick got rid of them! suggest you get a similar saint type person to go whereever you are moving its the only way to be absolutely sure to be sure.
 
#16
It could be worse. In New London, CT a number of years ago I met a couple just in from Kings Bay, GA base. They said there were so many poisonous snakes that the wife used to carry a holstered .45 anytime she took the kids into the yard to play on the swingset. IIRC the mom shot 23 poisonous snakes in her yard in 3 years. Apparently she also got a few non-poisonous ones by mistake. She used snakeshot, not ball ammo. I know you can't have handguns in the UK but maybe ratshot in a .22lr would do the job.
 
#17
DavidBOC said:
It could be worse. In New London, CT a number of years ago I met a couple just in from Kings Bay, GA base. They said there were so many poisonous snakes that the wife used to carry a holstered .45 anytime she took the kids into the yard to play on the swingset. IIRC the mom shot 23 poisonous snakes in her yard in 3 years. Apparently she also got a few non-poisonous ones by mistake. She used snakeshot, not ball ammo. I know you can't have handguns in the UK but maybe ratshot in a .22lr would do the job.
Our new house is in a hunting area, I assume shotguns are permitted...

Yeah, I can picture myself in knee-high leather boots with jingle-bells (so not to startle a snake) and a shotgun strolling around the garden... dear Lord! Should've bought a house in Iceland.

On a serious note, I went through few First Aid instructions and found some contradictions there: 1) apply pressure above and below the wound / apply pressure above the wound; 2) apply ice / don't apply ice; 3) suck the poison out / don't suck the poison out; 4) make an incision / don't make an incision... :?
 
#19
In AUSTRALIA we use the pressure immobilisation treatment for all snakebites, that is , STARTING AT THE BITE SITE USING A CREPE OR RUBBER THREAD BANDAGE TWICE AROUND THE LIMB THEN TO THE DISTAL END OF THE LIMB AND RETURN PROXIAMATELY THEN SPLINT THE LIMB TO THE BODY >
 

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