Army Rumour Service

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Slow March - Now what was that all about?

Actingunpaid

Old-Salt
Any more National Service memories of marching?.....Like those sprogs who would practice marching with arm going forward same as the leg, in an attempt to get out early, unable to march correctly?
I'm sure the SDI was foaming at the mouth with one lad in our recruit party,who ended up parading with the halt and the lame at passing out.The GWAR
 
For pokey drill. It always used make me snigger watching the Provo give 3 or 4 “change step”s to the SUS, who invariably anticipated another one, and changed step when they weren’t supposed to and about fell over when the Provo gave another one one step later. Every time :)

Moral of the story - don’t get caught :)

Morning @Roadster280,
Always found that hilarious. Even funnier watching SUS, being rifted to scoff, scoff-hall at other end of camp ie. Distance and gradient important. After a long rift, R.P. lets gets him marking time, then shit-loads of change steps, about turns then "FORWARD!", bellowed down lug--hole. Alway got them stumbling/falling.
Your moral holds but I always thought. He could be in for a 'nothing' reason and thank fck it's not me.






Not for me to say R.P.s, bunch of cvnts. Job description, individual character etc. Some enjoyed the power and were really 'disliked'. Though for balance, not all of them.
 
Two others come to mind. The change arms and change step.
Change arms was handy on a long march with a shouldered "that rifle" but change step? I never saw the use really.
Used when a body of marching troops are out of kilter with the band. The "strong beat" should be (I think) on the right foot.

Being navy, we find ourselves having to use this order fairly frequently...
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
There was an odd drill movement which I think was called secure arms. The rifle ended up with the bolt/receiver area held in the armpit, rifle parallel with the ground, muzzle forward, supported by the hand on forestock, 12 inches back from the foresight. It was meant to be used when wearing the waterproof (yeah, right) cape and protected the rifle from rain/snow.
The position, with a modified movement, continued after re-equipping with the SLR in 1959.
 
Any more National Service memories of marching?.....Like those sprogs who would practice marching with arm going forward same as the leg, in an attempt to get out early, unable to march correctly?
National Service had nothing to do with it! We had a mong at RMAS who just couldn't march properly. He left in the end. He was sh1t anyway but an awfully decent guy.
 
0F598B25-6408-4A9F-B4E7-FE8F17B10BBE.jpeg
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
RAF Drill Manual online.

“For the purpose of hinstruction, this movement his broken down into parts, the first part being . . . “
 
Last edited:

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
National Service had nothing to do with it! We had a mong at RMAS who just couldn't march properly. He left in the end. He was sh1t anyway but an awfully decent guy.
Our term at IJLB had a guy who could not march, he always swung right arm with right leg and left with left. No amount of shouting would do, so after a day or so, one of the woodentop drill sgts took him aside for some personal instruction.

Now this was not of the shouty shouty type but he gently got him walking normally, which the lad could do fine as it was only when it went stiff and formal that he started walking out of step with himself. Having got him walking the DS got him to gradually smarten up and by the end of that drill session the lad could join the squad and march the same as the rest of us. A bit of gentle instruction worked way better than a lot of shouting. Quite a lesson to the lad, and the rest of us young Juniors.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor

Troy

LE
Morning @Stanchion,
Are the guys in the boat holding the bridge up, on their heads?
Gen'., question. What's the back-story? I can see 'Coldstream Guards'(not depot, peaks slashed etc), but left glasses in gaff.

Bridge Test
25th September 1957: 300 NCO's and men from the Coldstream Guards march and counter march across a new concrete bridge constructed in St James's Park, London, while architects and engineers in a boat beneath the centre of the bridge test it for any signs of weakness. (Photo by Derek Berwin/Fox Photos/Getty Images)
 
Two others come to mind. The change arms and change step.
Change arms was handy on a long march with a shouldered "that rifle" but change step? I never saw the use really.
As a cadet i saw change step used a lot* - mainly because my mate could be out of step with himself and another lad who naturally tick tocked



*Once to the great amusement of all as he was marched to a fence and thus marking time and no one had ever adressed how you changed step under said circumstances - kicking the heel doesnt work
 
Not a drill move, but on some old suspension footbridges there can still be seen a sign 'TROOPS BREAK STEP'. This was to prevent a sympathetic wave building up, ultimately causing the bridge to collapse.

I think that the Millennium Bridge over the Thames suffered such problems without any troops being within miles of it - until some very expensive modifications were made.

Not beyond the realms of possibility.


Wasn't the command "break step" used for troops crossing sand and grass.
 

Brotherton Lad

LE
Kit Reviewer
Watch these chaps from last Tuesday:


You can skip the first 7 minutes of waiting to get on parade.
 
Those who know me know I'm a never served nomark civvie. However I come from an army family, unfortunately I chose to join the sea cadets in my yoof.
On a two week course at Lympstone I was indentified as having "da beat" and ended up teaching those without the rhythm how to change step and as alluded to march without moving an arm with a leg "a la Beatles on abbey road". Unfortunately this Followed me on further courses at Excellent, Cambridge and Raleigh.
Some still wonder why I never joined.

M.b. drives my wife mad when I subconsciously change step to match her.
 

Latest Threads

Top