Skill At Arms pre-amble

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
#1
Prompted by a semi-related discussion with friends, I seem to recall that during recruit training our DS would begin a Skill At Arms lesson with a preamble that went along the lines of, "the right to bear arms is a privilege in the eyes of our nation". This seemed to have disappeared by the time I was a Skilly instructing CROW (mid-naughties).

Does anyone know if this was actually written in a PAM somewhere, or just one of those faddish things DS sometimes used to come out with?
 
#2
Don't remember that happening, or having to do it on either of my cadre courses - late 70's to early 90's.
 
#3
Prompted by a semi-related discussion with friends, I seem to recall that during recruit training our DS would begin a Skill At Arms lesson with a preamble that went along the lines of, "the right to bear arms is a privilege in the eyes of our nation". This seemed to have disappeared by the time I was a Skilly instructing CROW (mid-naughties).

Does anyone know if this was actually written in a PAM somewhere, or just one of those faddish things DS sometimes used to come out with?
Sounds like part of lesson one for teaching the Rifle 5.56mm.

I completed my RPC2 ‘93 and MPC(A) in ‘94 and it was still taught then.

I think it goes on “and carries with it responsibilities......”.
 
#4
The right to bear arms was conferred on all Englishmen by the Bill of Rights of 1689. That is where the wording comes from. At that time it was conferred so that English Protestants could defend themselves from a perceived threat of violence from Roman Catholicism. I guess a parallel today would be having the right to bear arms to defend oneself against terrorism.

Your DS was getting himself confused though, if something is a 'right' then I wouldn't say it was a privelage and vice versa.
 

RP578

LE
Book Reviewer
#5
Your DS was getting himself confused though, if something is a 'right' then I wouldn't say it was a privelage and vice versa.
As per dingerr's post above, I heard it used by multiple DS at different times, so it wasn't a case of one DS making something up himself.

On a semantic point, the right to do so something could indeed be a privilege, if it is limited to a sub-section of society i.e. the Armed Forces.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#6
I don't remember such preamble, however every small arms lesson had its own preamble, printed as the first paragraph to a particular lesson. I can remember much of the 'patter' for example. '"During this lesson I am going to teach you the Load, Unload, and The Makesafe of the rifle. The reason for this is that these actions become second nature under battle conditions" etc etc. However we were taught at various times that we were 'Twice a citizen' and obliged to obey the rules of being a civilian and the additional rules of being a soldier, which I suppose covered the rules of carriage of arms.
Edited to add: SASC QMSI's had there own little habits and if the one attached to your unit had a particular fad, then it was soon fed in bucket loads to Tommy Atkins.
 
Last edited:
#7
Prompted by a semi-related discussion with friends, I seem to recall that during recruit training our DS would begin a Skill At Arms lesson with a preamble that went along the lines of, "the right to bear arms is a privilege in the eyes of our nation". This seemed to have disappeared by the time I was a Skilly instructing CROW (mid-naughties).

Does anyone know if this was actually written in a PAM somewhere, or just one of those faddish things DS sometimes used to come out with?
SAA mid 80's

SAA '' preamble '' in those days consisted of an Aim, Incentive and Reason why. I certainly never heard, or indeed come across a '' Preamble '' that began - The right to bear....... in 22 years Service
 
#8
I don't remember such preamble, however every small arms lesson had its own preamble, printed as the first paragraph to a particular lesson. I can remember much of the 'patter' for example. '"During this lesson I am going to teach you the Load, Unload, and The Makesafe of the rifle. The reason for this is that these actions become second nature under battle conditions" etc etc. However we were taught at various times that we were 'Twice a citizen' and obliged to obey the rules of being a civilian and the additional rules of being a soldier, which I suppose covered the rules of carriage of arms.
Edited to add: SASC QMSI's had there own little habits and if the one attached to your unit had a particular fad, then it was soon fed in bucket loads to Tommy Atkins.
To be fair, your SAA lessons were on musketry and the written word wasn’t widespread. ^^
 
#9
Ours always included; "Use safely among your comrades and effectively against the enemy..."
 
#10
Wasn’t there a part about arming bears? My memory is cloudy.
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#11
In one's little brown book AB 64 part 2, which carried your 'Skill at Arms' record. it stated boldly at the top of the weapons skills page; ' Your weapons are given you to kill the enemy'
 

overopensights

ADC
Book Reviewer
#12
SAA mid 80's

SAA '' preamble '' in those days consisted of an Aim, Incentive and Reason why. I certainly never heard, or indeed come across a '' Preamble '' that began - The right to bear....... in 22 years Service
Your post reminds me of the other parts of the lessons 'Confirm by stages and the 'Summing up'
 

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