Builds Six unknown horsemen of the metal variety, restoration/repaint

Smeggers

ADC
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Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Six horsemen?

I wonder who the additional two horsemen of the apocalypse would be in the 21st century?

I’d nominate

5. No internet access
6. SJW
Any Terry Pratchett reader will tell you that Chaos was the Fifth horseman but he left before they became famous. The Sixth would have to be Things Not Working, Even After You Give Them A Good Thumping!

Chaos changed his name to Ron Soak (KAOS) and became a dispenser of dairy products.
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Had this from PF which backs up Daz


Those are homecasts, made from molds that originated in Germany, though later there were mold makers here in the US who copied them.

The molds were made by Gebrüder Schneider, Schneider Brothers, who were located in Leipzig and operated from around 1890 up through 1945. They had a widely varied catalog of bronze molds for hobbyists to cast their own toy soldiers at home, and their products were very popular. Some used the molds to make figures which they painted, boxed, and sold as a cottage business. The Schneider catalog covered Ancients, medieval knights, cowboys & Indians, and most of the major European armies circa 1900, as well as the American army. For the German army, they made molds for Prussians in Pickelhauben and Jaeger in their shakos; Bavarians in their Raupenhelm, and Saxon Jaeger in their own distinctive shakos. They made cavalry figures, too, with cuirassiers, Uhlans, and hussars.

Here in the US, there was a German ex-pat named Henry Sachs who started off by selling Schneider molds, then copies of Schneider molds under his own label. That was back in the 1920s. There was a big market here for homecasting, and a couple other makers of molds started off selling Schneider molds and copies, notably Home Foundry and Junior Caster. You can still get molds today from a successor company, Castings, Inc, which sells a series of Schneider molds depicting Prussian bandsmen circa 1910.

In Germany, after the war, there was a gentleman in Cassel who made replicas of Schneider molds in a zinc alloy, Herr Höhmann. He also made molds from the catalog of Schneider Bros' chief competitor, Ideal ("ee-day-all"). Ideal had its own knights, very pretty, and African natives and scenes of village life. Herr Höhmann was a very nice gentleman; I bought many of my molds from him, to go with the original bronze Schneider molds that I have. Sadly, he passed away, and though he wanted his son to follow him in the business, that didn't happen.

This particular figure was a British cavalryman, 1914. Where the figure was cast, is almost impossible to say. Generally, if you bought them online, they were probably made in the country where the seller was located.

As a toy soldier collector, I enjoy these molds and the figures I make from them. I use old linotype metal, which produces a nice casting with crisp detail. Painted up, the figures have a certain charm to them. Buying them, though, is a hit-or-miss business. Most of the ones you find for sale are really only worth melting down, though.

Hope that helps, prosit!
Brad
From that I would be tempted to paint them up Britains figure style
 

ericferret

War Hero
I wonder if the carbine bucket on the r/h side suggests British.
Russian cavalry in photograph seem to carry rifles slung across the shoulders
 
first round of painting, let that dry, then some nit picking, touch in, and the grass gets a second shade. I'm tempted to finish them with a Britains style semi gloss varnish.
first round of paints.png


read somewhere that the scene in warhorse where the cavalry charge the German guns is made up and not based on any fact, well I never, Spielberg goes for spectacle effect rather than historic fact....again.
 
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Give you a bit of an idea;

 

lert

LE
first round of painting, let that dry, then some nit picking, touch in, and the grass gets a second shade. I'm tempted to finish them with a Britains style semi gloss varnish.
View attachment 494557

read somewhere that the scene in warhorse where the cavalry charge the German guns is made up and not based on any fact, well I never, Spielberg goes for spectacle effect rather than historic fact....again.
Reminds me of one of those horse racing games you used to get at the arcades!

I don't know enough to say whether the charge in Warhorse is based on fact or not but it's in the book so perhaps Spielberg could be allowed a little leeway! What spoiled it for me was the swordsmanship employed. I was under the impression the Pattern 1908 (or 1912 Officer's since it's Hiddlestone and Cimberbatch you see most of, Lt Col and Capt repectively) was a thrusting weapon not a mere slasher as in the film.

Proper ruined it for me that did. Otherwise I was totally bought in......
 

lert

LE
Anyways I guess since the figures in question appear to have curved blades, they could always be post-Boer but pre-First War cavalry?
 
all done and on display in a glass fronted display case, out of reach of sticky inquisitive fingers, or an irritated furry paw, or even Mrs Sprocket with her feather duster.
on display.png
 

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