Sir - You are a C...

#1
Is this true? Capt Shoots Range Safety Supervisor 8O

Ok ok... its in the 'scum' but please dont tell me is true ....

How stupid can you get, going on the piss till 5 am, gettin rat-arsed, 2 hours gonk then going on the range.... hope the lads used the twat as a falling plate target after :evil:
 
#5
Looks like a genuine mistake ... when they're sober and trying to drop you that's the time to really worry about it ...

... bad news for the Bn boxing team if he couldn't stand up after the first round ... ouch ??!!!
 
#6
2 hours gonk
Thats what buggered the young gentleman up, he should have carried on the p!ss and who the f*ck let an officer have a machine gun for gawds sake, a Webley and a cane thats what gentlmen have, his batman needs to be put on a fizzer for this.
 
#7
An insider said: “It was a miracle the sergeant was not cut to ribbons in a hail of bullets.

“The captain had been drinking until 5am with other officers, knocking back anything he could lay his hands on.

“The accident was four hours after he swigged his last drop.”


Does anyone really speak in this ridiculous tabloid stylee? Or is it more likely that 'an insider' = The Scum's sensationalised version - to make it more 'accessible' for their brain-dead readers.
 
#8
Can anyone tell me what the fcuk this bit has to do with the rest of the story?!?

"Earlier this week, The Sun told how a 22-year-old Sandhurst officer cadet was burned on the forehead when a boozy game of “fireball hockey” went wrong in Norfolk."
 
#9
devilish said:
Can anyone tell me what the fcuk this bit has to do with the rest of the story?!?

"Earlier this week, The Sun told how a 22-year-old Sandhurst officer cadet was burned on the forehead when a boozy game of “fireball hockey” went wrong in Norfolk."

That'll be The Scum 'supporting our boys'.
 
#10
Have things changed that much since my time, do you actualy load and make ready before reaching the firing point these days?
 
#11
That's his career gone for a burton then.

Or maybe a desk in whitehall beckons.
 
#12
jinxy said:
Have things changed that much since my time, do you actualy load and make ready before reaching the firing point these days?
Not normally - but if you have been investing in the bar profits until 0500 ............... !!??
 
#13
Murielson said:
jinxy said:
Have things changed that much since my time, do you actualy load and make ready before reaching the firing point these days?
Not normally - but if you have been investing in the bar profits until 0500 ............... !!??
Don't believe everything that you read.
 
#14
It doesn't really say much about what sort of range the guy was on.
 
#15
chocolate_frog said:
It doesn't really say much about what sort of range the guy was on.
Hythe & Lydd, which has all sorts of ranges on it if I remember correctly.

Doesn't really matter, does it? He slotted the instructor in the leg, doesn't matter if it was a 500m range or a CQB effort.

Thank fcuk it looks like a flesh wound. Get well soon, mate.

V!
 
#17
An insider said: “It was a miracle the sergeant was not cut to ribbons in a hail of bullets."
5.56mm rounds are designed to tumble, so it's exceedingly unlikely that the poor chap would have been 'cut to ribbons', although he wouldn't exactly have been capable of sustained vigorous activity.

I'm also keen to meet this 'insider' (presumably Army) who thinks its acceptable to refer to sustained small arms fire as a 'hail' - shurely expressions this cheesy are reserved for Action Man magazine? ;)

Hope the Range Spvr gets well soon.

Edited to add:

Earlier this week, The Sun told how a 22-year-old Sandhurst officer cadet was burned on the forehead when a boozy game of “fireball hockey” went wrong in Norfolk.
Fcuk me, the Scum really are cnuts, aren't they? Eulogise a selfish has-been wife-beating alcoholic all you like, but get a bit pi$$ed and fcuk around and the hangman's noose beckons. To$$ers.
 
#18
Darth_Doctrinus said:
5.56mm rounds are designed to tumble
'Fraid not old chap. any such design is banned by the Hague Convention.

5.56mm will only behave the same as any other streamlined round. It is likely to tumble on hitting solid mass or on reaching terminal velocity.

I used to think the same as you but I had an extensive debate with somebody who knew his stuff and backed it up with a lot of readily available studies from the web.
 
#19
GDav said:
Darth_Doctrinus said:
5.56mm rounds are designed to tumble
5.56mm will only behave the same as any other streamlined round. It is likely to tumble on hitting solid mass or on reaching terminal velocity.
Correct. All rounds tumble at some stage - if nothing gets in the way before.

The idea that the 5.56 was 'designed' to tumble, is a misunderstanding of those who remember the SLR/7.62 round. The 7.62 would fly straight and true from an SLR far further than most of us can see - especially in the typical north European setting. The 5.56, however, tumbles at a far earlier range/distance, and thus could well be in 'tumbled' stage at a target that you've aimed at. Anyone who's a reasonably accurate shot, and coming from the SLR, can expact to hit a target at greater ranges than the 5.56 stays 'true' - hence the misconception.

Also, from personal experience, light foliage can cause a 5.56 (R4-combination) to 'tumble' early, whereas the 7.62 (R1) would pass straight through some pretty heavy bush without deflection!
 
#20
I know somebody is going to take me up on this so to save an argument in advance here's a couple of salient facts.

All pointed non-expanding bullets tumble after impact with flesh as their spin is unsufficient to stabilize their flight in a material denser than air, and if the jacket is relatively thin this results in G-forces sufficient to cause the bullet to break into two or more pieces and vastly increases the wounding effectiveness of the bullet's impact. The effect is very similar to that of a hollow-point bullet.

http://www.answers.com/topic/bullet

Hague Convention (1899) Declaration III - On the Use of Bullets Which Expand or Flatten Easily in the Human Body

http://www.answers.com/main/ntquery...nventions+(1899+and+1907)&gwp=8&curtab=2222_1

The full declaration can be found here: http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/lawofwar/dec99-03.htm

The Declaration of St Petersburg 1868 is the precursor to the Hague Declaration III and can be found here: http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/lawofwar/decpeter.htm

so you can see that, although steel jacketed, pointed bullets all tumble naturally, they are not designed to do so. Such design is forbidden by international treaties which the UK is signatory to.
 

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