Sir John Moore and Corunna 200 - Not Forgotten

Should Sir John and battles hounours be honoured after 200 years?

  • Yes, lest we foreget!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No, it means nothing to the soldier today.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
#1
Dear all,

Next week see's the 200th anniversary of the Retreat and Battle of Corunna as well as the heroic death of Sir John Moore.

The good people of Sandgate, Kent, members of the Shorncliffe Redoubt Preservation Society and re-enactors will be marking this event with a commemoration on the 17th January at 10.30am at Sir Johns memorial on the sea front

We will be marking this great Soldier who revolutionised they way men were trained. We will also be honouring the men, women and children who died on the retreat and at the battle.

This will be followed by a tour of Sir John Moores Redoubt by Shorncliffe Camp.

Those of you wanting to attend and help us save Sir John Moores Redoubt please contact me chris.shaw@shornclifferedoubt.com[email]

Look to your colours - our society has not and will not forget battle honours, just because they are not in the press. Come and join us and celebrate a great man who lead the way in how to train and treat the British Soldier.

Best wishes

Chris Shaw
Chairman
Shorncliffe Redoubt Preservation Society
[url=http://www.shornclifferedoubt.com]Shorncliffe Redoubt[/url]
[email]chris.shaw@shornclifferedoubt.com
 
#2
Next week see's the bicentenary of the battle of Corunna and the death of Sir John Moore.

Sandgate, home to Sir John Moore, where he formed the Light Infantry at Shorncliffe Redoubt are marking this event.

The details are as follows

TO CONFIRM

Corunna 200 UK - Saturday 17th January 2009.

The event is in two parts and is in conjunction with the Sandgate Parish Council, the SRPS, 1st Foot Guards and the 95th/RHA (other units will be attending). There should be about 20+ firers and about 40 re-enactors, the guest are said to be between 200 - 300+. There will be local press and TV coverage.

It is in two parts. Firstly the commemoration and then a tour of Shorncliffe Redoubt.

Commemoration - Sir John Moore Memorial, Sandgate. Starts 10.30 am

The event starts at 10.30 and will run about 40 minutes. There will be a full service lead local vicar and Army Padre. Re-enactors will fire the volley, associations and regiments wil lay wreaths and then march to Local Hotel for beverages.

The Tour - Shorncliffe Redoubt, Hospital Hill, Sandgate

We move to the Redoubt at 12.00pm and will gather by the Military Cemetary. The tour starts at 12.30.

There will be a tour by Michael George, historian and drill by re-enactors, whilst the visitors gather but mainly it is a chance for those of you who have not been there for a good look around. Remember Shorncliffe is going to be handed over to us soon and I want those of us who want to take back our heritage from the accountants and civil servants to stamp our mark on it.

Tour will end around 2.00pm

This is a once in a life time opportunity and the only bi-centennial Napoleonic Event celebrated in this country. The theme of the day is to celebrate Sir John Moore’s life and achievements, but not mourn his death.

The people of Sandgate are honoured to have the link with the Britsh army for more than 200 years, please support them.

Call me 07958 611956 for a map, directions or more details.

Chris Shaw
Chairman
SRPS
 
#3
Alas, I wish I could be there, if only IMO my Gt Gt Gt Grandad of the 43rd Light Infantry who was there. He had an arm badly damaged, and was discharged with a pension. 6d a day.

Hope it goes very well!
 
#5
The 43rd will be there?
Surely you mean re-enactors of the 43rd will be there.

Having said all you have, I have to admit, I had totally forgotten about Corunna.
This was due to my growing exstacy about the upcoming 200th anniversary of the storming of Bodajoz!

Bet your lot did not make a fuss about the 200th of the Glorious First either!
 
#6
Yes re-enactors as we are the ones keeping the flame alive of regiments lost to time through mergers and disolution of great units.

We are associated with numerous commemorations, but money and interest is in short supply. But we carry on, never falter and never surrender.

That's why it's taken civvies 4 years to save Shorncliffe Redoubt, when the Army and MOD didn't care!

I do and so does my private army!

We want to do the Talavera march this year, should be fun

Rfn Shaw, 95th Rifles
 
#7
As an ex 2RGJ man I totally admire your commitment. There was a mention of the event on the RGJ Assoc website. But us 60th Rifles were already Riflemen but SJM served as adjudant with the 5/60th.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#8
As an ex 3 RGJ man I too would love to be there, Shornecliffe has a place in the regimantal heart, but alas I can't get away. Best wishes and hope it goes well.
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#9
Sir John Moore - a fine example of one of the many the great generals produced by Scotland.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#10
Auld-Yin said:
Sir John Moore - a fine example of one of the many the great generals produced by Scotland.
But educated and developed by the English. 8)
 
#11
It isn't just the Brits who remember Corruna either. And yes, I know that this was 5 years ago!!

Spain pays tribute to British role in defeating Napoleon

By Isambard Wilkinson in Corunna
Last Updated: 11:25PM GMT 16 Jan 2004

After two centuries of bitterness over Britain's role in ousting Napoleon's forces from the Iberian Peninsula, Spain yesterday honoured the soldiers' efforts by commemorating one of the most famous retreats in the British Army's history.

Cannon fire and muskets rang out across the bay of Corunna as Spanish, French and British officials yesterday marked the 195th anniversary of the "Retreat to Corunna" led by Sir John Moore during the Peninsula War.

Spanish officials put aside residual enmity over the action, which led to British soldiers drinking, raping and pillaging their way across the Spanish countryside.

"This commemoration contributes to the unity of the European nations," said Francisco Vazquez, the mayor of Corunna.

"We must bury past conflicts and celebrate a lasting peace."

The head of the expeditionary force, Sir John managed to march 15,000 of his men across Spain for two weeks with little rest and no rations and then embark them while under heavy fire in January 1809.

He is credited with saving the British Army, which was able to return to the peninsula under the command of the Duke of Wellington, who drove the French from Spain in what the Spanish call the War of Independence.

A bust of Sir John Moore was unveiled by the British ambassador to Madrid, Stephen Wright, and flowers were laid to commemorate the thousands of soldiers and sailors who died during the retreat.

During the last phase of the retreat Sir John was fatally wounded by a cannonball but he continued to rally his troops in a counter-attack. He died that evening and was buried in the ramparts of the city, where there is now a walled garden.

Sir John lost 2,000 men and one fifth of his army was missing. The streets of Corunna ran red with blood as orders were given to slaughter hundreds of cavalry horses in case they fell into French hands.

"Its wonderful that the Spanish people appreciate the efforts of Sir John Moore and that they can put aside the rather poor popular image of the British soldier there," said Ian Fletcher, a noted historian on the Peninsula War.

The remnants of the expeditionary force arrived back in Portsmouth, bedraggled and haggard, to the horror of townspeople.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...te-to-British-role-in-defeating-Napoleon.html
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#12
old_fat_and_hairy said:
Auld-Yin said:
Sir John Moore - a fine example of one of the many the great generals produced by Scotland.
But educated and developed by the English. 8)
Actually he wasn't. From his wiki entry

He was born in Glasgow, the son of John Moore, a doctor and writer, and the older brother of Vice Admiral Sir Graham Moore [1], (1764 - 1843) . He attended Glasgow High School, but at the age of eleven joined his father and Douglas, the young 16 year old 8th Duke of Hamilton, (1756 - 1799), his father's pupil, on a grand tour of France, Italy and Germany, This included a two-year stay in Geneva, where Moore's education continued.
 
#13
Auld-Yin said:
Sir John Moore - a fine example of one of the many the great generals produced by Scotland.
Unfortunately our Scottish contact in Hollyrood has failed to get any support from Politians or the Media north of the boarder. It seems you are one of the few Scots that care.

I think that is a shame and disgrace. So it is left to Englishmen to save and honour Sir John - Braveheart my arse.

But thank you for caring. He will be remembered, as will the English, Welsh, Scotish and Irish soldiers who fought and died with him.

Best wishes

Rfn Shaw
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#14
Auld-Yin said:
old_fat_and_hairy said:
Auld-Yin said:
Sir John Moore - a fine example of one of the many the great generals produced by Scotland.
But educated and developed by the English. 8)
Actually he wasn't. From his wiki entry

He was born in Glasgow, the son of John Moore, a doctor and writer, and the older brother of Vice Admiral Sir Graham Moore [1], (1764 - 1843) . He attended Glasgow High School, but at the age of eleven joined his father and Douglas, the young 16 year old 8th Duke of Hamilton, (1756 - 1799), his father's pupil, on a grand tour of France, Italy and Germany, This included a two-year stay in Geneva, where Moore's education continued.
Just proves my point! France, Italy and Germany, all countries that were civilised and settled by fine English yeoman, and it's a well-known fact that Geneva is actually a suburb of Ashby de la Zouch!
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#15
old_fat_and_hairy said:
Auld-Yin said:
old_fat_and_hairy said:
Auld-Yin said:
Sir John Moore - a fine example of one of the many the great generals produced by Scotland.
But educated and developed by the English. 8)
Actually he wasn't. From his wiki entry

He was born in Glasgow, the son of John Moore, a doctor and writer, and the older brother of Vice Admiral Sir Graham Moore [1], (1764 - 1843) . He attended Glasgow High School, but at the age of eleven joined his father and Douglas, the young 16 year old 8th Duke of Hamilton, (1756 - 1799), his father's pupil, on a grand tour of France, Italy and Germany, This included a two-year stay in Geneva, where Moore's education continued.
Just proves my point! France, Italy and Germany, all countries that were civilised and settled by fine English yeoman, and it's a well-known fact that Geneva is actually a suburb of Ashby de la Zouch!
:D
 
#16
Slowly and sadly we laid him down,
From the field of his fame fresh and gory;
We carved not a line, and we raised not a stone,
But we left him alone with his glory.
Charles Wolfe (1791–1823), The Burial of Sir John Moore after Corunna


I visited his grave in 1976 during the awful heatwave.

For McGonagall fans here is his poem The Battle of Corunna
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#18
IndianaDel said:
The 43rd will be there?
Surely you mean re-enactors of the 43rd will be there.

Having said all you have, I have to admit, I had totally forgotten about Corunna.
This was due to my growing exstacy about the upcoming 200th anniversary of the storming of Bodajoz!

Bet your lot did not make a fuss about the 200th of the Glorious First either!
If your service involved 15H (you must be OLD!), 15/19H or LD, you wouldn't be allowed to forget. Sahagun (21 Dec 1808) marked the high tide for Sir John Moore, to be followed immediately by the retreat, and it has been the primary Regimental day for them all. 10H (now KRH) were on the bench but did not get to play and did not get a cap as a result.
 
#19
I was pleased to hear that Glasgow has marked Sir John today. Hopefully they'll now get behind us to save his Redoubt.

Funny though, we emailed every SMP from Salmon downwards and only got one reply.

What a surprise!
 
#20
If you ever visit Glasgow feel free to pop into the Pub named after him near his birthplace.

"His statue, raised by public subscription, stands on the south side of George Square. It was made by John Flaxman RA (1755-1826) and was the first statue in George Square, erected in 1819."
 

Attachments

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads

Top