Sinn Fein pledge a referendum on a United Ireland!

#1
Sinn Fein is seeking a referendum on Irish unity in its assembly manifesto.
The party is also proposing a referendum on a new all-Ireland constitution, and wants people in Northern Ireland to be allowed to vote in Irish presidential elections.
It calls for tax-varying and borrowing powers to be transferred to Stormont, and cross-border tax harmonisation.
Martin McGuinness said "much has changed" in the four years following the restoration of devolution in 2007.
"The locally elected executive, assembly and all-Ireland bodies are working for the benefit of people across this island," he said.
Mr McGuinness added: "As a society we cannot allow those within and those outside the political process attempt to drag us back. They cannot and will not be allowed to succeed. Those days are gone and will not return.
"While we all retain our differences, we can all be proud of the role we have played in promoting the peace process, by stabilising these institutions and demonstrating the primacy of politics."
Pledges in the Sinn Fein manifesto include:
  • Increasing economic and fiscal powers away from London to Stormont;
  • Implementing the Review of Public Administration to deliver £400m in savings, including the reduction of councils from 26 to 11;
  • Blocking the introduction of separate household water charges;
  • Opposing any increases in student fees;
  • Introducing a phone mast levy to generate £160m over four years;
  • Delivering Bill of Rights;
  • Promoting the Irish language act, and implementing all-Ireland strategy to create new Gaeltacht areas, particularly in urban centres;
  • Bringing in all-Ireland public health system which provides free care at point of delivery;
  • Reinstating 50-50 Catholic/Protestant recruitment policy to the PSNI;
  • Establish all-Ireland job creation plan.
 
#3
#4
Are you a resident of Northern Ireland?
No. But it's (sadly) British right? So just as the Scots and Welsh get to vote on English issues, why can't we return the compliment to the dominions and have our say on the future of Ulster?

Edited to add, I think I've spent enough bloody time there to have earned a vote on this one...
 
#5
Does any other party favour a referendum?
 

Sixty

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#6
No. But it's (sadly) British right? So just as the Scots and Welsh get to vote on English issues
We do?

It's Scots and Welsh MPs you're on about there rather than the rest of us.
 
#7
No. But it's (sadly) British right? So just as the Scots and Welsh get to vote on English issues, why can't we return the compliment to the dominions and have our say on the future of Ulster?
Because the British government decided that it was for the citizens of Northern Ireland to take their own future in their own hands.

Thus its only NI citizens who can vote in any referendum.

And yes it is still British, for the forseeable future.

I think theres actually a reference in the Belfast Agreement were it says you can take your vote and shove it up your hole.
 
#8
"While we all retain our differences, we can all be proud of the role we have played in promoting the peace process, by stabilising these institutions and demonstrating the primacy of politics."

SNIP

[*]Reinstating 50-50 Catholic/Protestant recruitment policy to the PSNI;
Point one. Proud of the role in promoting peace? By being a murdering cnut? It was the British Army that proved terrorism doesn't work, not terrorist cnuts in the ira and uff... or the cnuts of labour. The everyday( non murdering cnuts) people of Ulster also helped.

Point two. If terrorist fcukers like our marty and gezzer hadn't been so keen on killing Catholic RUC officers, or at the very least intimidating them out of the service, they wouldn't need b0llocks legislation like that.

None too long ago 'Come home to a real fire, join the RUC' was daubed on Catholic walls'.

Given the antics of some scroats in recent weeks it would appear marty needs to take control of the internal security unit, get some new 'nutters' in and start doing some diy and rompering.
 
#10
Does any other party favour a referendum?
The SDLP favour a United Ireland by referendum but won't call for it. Alliance party are nuetral so would support it as they are non Orange/non Green.

And possibly the DUP as they are so far up Sinn Feins ass its not possible to know were they stand on the union anymore.
 
#12
let them have their referendum if it passes away you go if it does'nt shut up and getting on with dragging the place into the 20th centuary.
ffs nobody in england cares if your protestant or catholic most of them could'nt tell you the diffrence or care.
 
#13
No. But it's (sadly) British right? So just as the Scots and Welsh get to vote on English issues, why can't we return the compliment to the dominions and have our say on the future of Ulster?

Edited to add, I think I've spent enough bloody time there to have earned a vote on this one...
In the same way that the good people over here
should be able to vote on immigration to GB. No pakis, no indigos, no blax, no poles, no afghans, no arabs, no turx, infact anybody who was not born in the UK.
#
 

Auld-Yin

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#14
In the same way that the good people over here
should be able to vote on immigration to GB. No pakis, no indigos, no blax, no poles, no afghans, no arabs, no turx, infact anybody who was not born in the UK.
#


Well that means thousands of pad brats looking for a new home! I wouldn't mind being 'repatriated' to Singapore!
 
#15
let them have their referendum if it passes away you go if it does'nt shut up and getting on with dragging the place into the 20th centuary.
ffs nobody in england cares if your protestant or catholic most of them could'nt tell you the diffrence or care.
I doubt this referendum would cure anything... orange sashes and bowlers would still march, and the rest would mutter about potatoe famines or something.
 
#16
Renewed Irish violence: Blair’s two big mistakes
Car bomb in South Armagh
Crispin Black: Tony Blair should have renegotiated Good Friday deal after 9/11 killed off IRA’s funding
By Crispin Black
LAST UPDATED 6:02 AM, APRIL 18, 2011
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The discovery of a 500lb van bomb outside Newry, South Armagh 10 days ago and the murder of Constable Ronan Kerr in Omagh, County Tyrone earlier this month show that unreconciled Republican splinter groups are growing bolder.

It is not unexpected. Jonathan Evans, head of MI5, has been warning publicly for over a year that Republican 'splinter groups' are becoming more ambitious, with some of the most extreme able to attract new young recruits with no criminal record or intelligence profile from 'The Troubles'.

But given that a united 32-county Ireland might only be a generation away, it seems an odd time for a renewed terrorist campaign by disaffected Republicans. Why is it happening?

In part we are dealing with Irish history. Whenever a group of Republican terrorists comes to some sort of arrangement with the British government, another group of hardliners breaks away and vows to continue the violent struggle. That's just the way it is.

But in part we are dealing with the consequences of yet another misjudgment by Tony Blair. He made two crucial mistakes in negotiating the 1998 Good Friday Agreement. The first was that he underestimated the sheer brutality of elements of the IRA leadership and its rank and file.

The IRA in South Armagh and Tyrone, particularly, were notorious for their arrogant and bullying ways. Torture and beatings were a first resort. Protection and extortion rackets made them rich. And their writ ran absolutely. Any young man who dared court a young woman who had caught the eye of an IRA boss risked knee-capping or worse. It was gang rule pure and simple, dressed up as Irish patriotism.

But Blair chose to ignore this fundamental truth, judging that a little selective amnesia was worth it. Maybe it was at the time.

Ex-terrorists certainly can come good. EOKA terrorists who bombed and murdered British troops on Cyprus in the 1950s and 60s evolved rapidly into civilised citizens after we withdrew into our sovereign bases. Some of the best tavernas in the Troodos mountains to this day are run by ex-EOKA men and their families - always with a warm welcome for British troops from the garrison or on their way back from Afghanistan.

Having operated in Northern Ireland since 1969, the security service did not fall for the IRA's new-found charm. Throughout the early years of the Good Friday Agreement, MI5 never took their eye off the ball. Despite the emerging challenge of Islamist terrorism back home, they ensured that talented people were still assigned to Belfast, including a number of counter-espionage experts to make sure that the new policing and security structures were not penetrated by IRA diehards.

Since 2007 they have been responsible for all intelligence matters in the Province operating from their state-of-the-art headquarters at Loughside in the Belfast suburb of Holywood.

Sadly, no amount of preparedness can make up for the legacy of Blair's second and less forgivable mistake. Of course concessions had to be made to bring the IRA on board. But it is hard to understand why Tony Blair did not revisit the Good Friday Agreement after 9/11.

Organisations like the New York Fire Department who marched enthusiastically in the same St Patrick's Day parade as the IRA's emissaries from the old country suddenly understood what terrorist bombs do to people.

Overnight, the financial and political support that some Americans had given the IRA for more than 100 years dried up. The IRA and its fellow travellers in Sinn Fein were on their uppers * at risk of being bundled up in world opinion with the Islamist crazies.

Far from additional concessions, Blair should have gazumped them, * forced the IRA to destroy its weapons and explosives and kept Republican prisoners in jail until he was satisfied that they had done so. The so-called 'splinter groups' like Oglaigh na hEireann which was behind this month's incidents would never have got off the ground.

Nevertheless, despite concerns about recent events, the security service remain confident in the long term that Northern Ireland will continue to be peaceful.

If you think their Loughside headquarters is 'too big for purpose' that's because it's not just for fighting Irish terrorism. The building houses MI5's national emergency back-up centre, including 'surge' personnel and computers.

It is an astonishing irony that Northern Ireland, despite its difficult history, is seen as relatively immune from the dangers of Jihadism. If anything really terrible were to happen in London or elsewhere on the mainland, our spooks consider Belfast the safest place to be.

Read more: Renewed Irish violence: Tony Blair's two big mistakes | News & Politics | News & Comment | The First Post
 
#17
Well down here the "referendum" would die by 2 words...."tax hike".

Thanks Gerry but no thanks we have you, your beard and your troll under the bridge that's enough for us.
 
#18
Gerry and co are behaving like early 90's labour. Smart suits makeovers and "blue sky thinking". and It's easy to see why with the loyalist/unionist parties in the north acting like the chuckle brothers on acid. The Enda and Eamon show in the south will do the same when the honeymoon is over as well. Sinnsane think they have the perfect storm (well blustery light shower) on their hands to gain popularity. They will keep putting foward their own adgenda in bite sized pieces untill it sounds quite reasonable to any moderate sheep out in the electoral pastures. The referendum is just one of those pieces. However I don't think the future will be all that rosey, their policies would make David Ike suck on his teeth and as is the want of all politicians some are going to get caught with their hands in the till and some with their cock up a rent boy.
 

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