Single cylinder motorcycle engines.

#23
The old Honda CB250RS was my favourite London bike - very small, lightweight and compact (I kept it in the house stairwell for security), but very punchy and quick because of the power to weight ratio.

Pity they don't make anything like that nowadays. Everything seems to three times the size and bulk for the same engine size - bit like the riders, I guess.
My lad's CBR300R is something like a successor. Well, the CBR300F, naked version more properly.

 
#25
I did my test on one of these (linked) with an underseat tank and some sort of weird false tank fairing arrangement for stowing a lid. The bike was supposed to be some kind of around town scooter replacement for people who didn't want to ride a scooter (scooters are great for what they're great at so just buy one).

I give you the BMW F650 Schiessrad BMW F650 (1993-2007) Review

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/32/BMW_F650_CS_storage_bag.jpg/300px-BMW_F650_CS_storage_bag.jpg
 
#27
My missus owns an MZ Skorpion. MZ stuck a Yamaha XTZ 660 engine in it. It goes like stink, likes to revs easy to 7K, and is smooth as hell mid range to about 90mph. It handles like it's hard wired to the riders brain.

 

cent05zr70

On ROPS
On ROPs
#32
Got a snap somewhere of Pater riding a Panther through a stream in a reliability trial, you may think a Panther was not the most sensible of trials irons, you may be right. As a handicap he had Mater on the "flapper pad"!
 
#33
Much as I liked big single cylinder bikes, having graduated from a CB125 as a teenager up to a brief romance with a SR500.

The one thing that bothered me was thinking; OK I'm happily barrelling along at 80mph about 6000rpm, that means that the piston is accelerating from a standstill up to the top of the cylinder, stopping, reversing direction accelerating down to the bottom of the cylinder, stopping, reversing and accelerating upwards again. Hmmmm, it's doing that 100 times per second and being a big lump it's quite weighty. Hmmmm, and I'm crouched over the tank so it's right below my chest.

That's when I thought maybe a 750-4 with smaller pistons would be safer.
 
#34
Much as I liked big single cylinder bikes, having graduated from a CB125 as a teenager up to a brief romance with a SR500.

The one thing that bothered me was thinking; OK I'm happily barrelling along at 80mph about 6000rpm, that means that the piston is accelerating from a standstill up to the top of the cylinder, stopping, reversing direction accelerating down to the bottom of the cylinder, stopping, reversing and accelerating upwards again. Hmmmm, it's doing that 100 times per second and being a big lump it's quite weighty. Hmmmm, and I'm crouched over the tank so it's right below my chest.

That's when I thought maybe a 750-4 with smaller pistons would be safer.
Interesting. So more cylinders less wear on the engine?
 
#36
Interesting. So more cylinders less wear on the engine?
Maybe, but I did recall a teacher explaining why multi cylinder engines are more powerful and can rev higher as the weights of the reciprocating parts are lighter. Also something to do with 'oversquare' engines (bore is greater than stroke) having less distance for the piston to travel. I did always lust after a CBX1000 just to see what it would be like.
honda-cbx-lead.jpg
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#37
Apropos of nothing.

1975. I'd flounced as a statutory right because RMP wouldn't let me transfer to RAC and was claiming dole. I took some motoring magazine with while I signed on. Read an article about a recent find in an Italian barn. A 1955 5 litre two cylinder engine designed to give a Ferrari maximum torque, explicitly for Monza.

Put it on test bed, fired it up, took the test bed with it like an unbalanced washing machine across the kitchen floor. Thought better of it, binned, forgotten.
 
#40
Yes, that is the other issue. Many bikes today seem big and unwieldy. More like car engines bolted to two wheels.


In terms of single cylinders I have been looking at the Yamaha MT03 (660cc)

View attachment 339594

or the Honda CMX500 View attachment 339597
The Honda is a coupled single cylinder bike with two cylinders connected together in a parallel layout that is quite popular with the manufacturers of twin cylinder motorcycles.
 

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