Simple bug in the super gucci F22

Discussion in 'Aviation' started by here_be_mike, Feb 26, 2007.

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  1. Just found this link and has a wee chuckle especially after RAF3s rant about how utterly amazing this aircraft is earlier today. Basically for those who cant be bother to read, there was a wargame with the plane in Alaska, F22 flies over international date line causing date to change thus crashing major internal systems including navigation and comms. Luckily it was a clear day so they could spot the refuelling tankers and piggy back them back to base :shakefist: Sounds strangly familier to the Y2K bug in that the system can handle a date change.

    http://www.dailytech.com/Lockheeds+F22+Raptor+Gets+Zapped+by+International+Date+Line/article6225.htm
     
  2. Given the complexity of the software in the aeroplane, a few bugs are hardly a surprise HBM. That's why you test, test and test again.

    PB
     
  3. Yes that’s the whole point of testing, but it’s the fact that it’s such a simple problem that caused such a major problem. The system can’t handle a change of date? I could understand if the system crashed if the software was drastically taken out with its design parameters, for example tricking the software that it has 1,000 missiles in its payload instead of whatever it carries. This is a really small thing, surely it would have been caught sooner during stress tests of the system (having it operate for days on end) when still in initial design stages.
     
  4. It was when the aircraft were deploying to Japan for an exercise and crossed the date line.

    However, the software glitch was identified and fixed in Hawaii. The F-22 are now in Japan on exercise as planned. No different to numerous previous glitches with new aircraft (eg Sea Harrier INS en route to Falklands as it crossed equator and Sea King not recognising Scillies as it was off map).

    New aircraft have glitches.

    MM
     
  5. Fair enough I stand corrected as to how silly this is. I just though such a simple problem would have been fixed long before being allowed off the ground.
     
  6. What is this, an early April fools joke? Is it only me who struggles to believe that the aircrafts clocks are connected in some way to its GPS, and that crossing the IDL causes it to automatically re-set them.
    I'm no avionics guru, but I am more than a little sceptical.
     
  7. Let's be honest though, if it is gen, the fact that a $65bn (to date) project, that's been under development for 20+ years gets flummoxed by a cousin of the Y2K bug has to raise at least a wry grin. (Unless, of course, you happen to be the stick monkey stuck inside it over the middle of the Pacific Ocean when it happens.)