Simmerit's build of the R.A. crossing over wooden bridges into Tunisia in 1943 - West Desert Build

PFGEN

GCM
Yeah, I'm aware they were issued with pistols, but carrying longs is a bit out of order for non-combattants!

I heard that as non-combatants they weren't allowed to be armed. If captured they were allowed to assume the rank of captain. To that end they were dressed with a Sam Browne and officers cap. They also had to have a "C" indicator on their sleeves. I've no source to quote from so could be wrong.
 
I heard that as non-combatants they weren't allowed to be armed. If captured they were allowed to assume the rank of captain. To that end they were dressed with a Sam Browne and officers cap. They also had to have a "C" indicator on their sleeves. I've no source to quote from so could be wrong.
Are you sure you're not confusing them with Correspondents who were civilian press? The AFPU were soldiers with cameras who were part of the propaganda effort so were not non-combatants in the Geneva Convention sense, much the same as REME etc weren't intended to charge about killing the enemy.
 
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ches

LE
Point of interest - maybe. I am just reviewing a pictorial book about 3rd US Armor in NW Europe WW2 and many of the jeeps had a rifle holster for the driver like this

View attachment 567315

Might be a good addition for your model.
a bit like this one?

View attachment 567321

I’m not sure if British keeps carrier rifles in a sling but I’ll be having a look at the jeeps in the piccies a few pages back in the thread and basically recreating them in every detail.

I went for the Meng model as apparently it’s got the best 50 and 30 cal cast guns seen on the modelling market to date (allegedly). I won’t me using them on my build so two for the spares box.

yes it probably merits a separate review.

Might need to be careful on this one, IIRC the leather/fabric holster for the driver as per the first pic was a US standard fit on early prod runs of the Jeep, but there was also the pressed steel clamp that was fixed to the rear of the folding windscreen, commonly held an M1 Garand however don't forget that kit supplied to the UK went through a strip down process of some sort - M3 & M4s would arrive (IIRC) with Thompsons or M3 SMGs as part of issue for crews & these as well as other US specific stuff was removed before issue. I remember reading this relating to the early issues of Shermans to the NA theatre & the blokes being livid at all sorts of happy kit being removed. I've not seen any pics of UK used Jeeps with the drivers holster fitted & iirc that the windscreen mounted clamp was also removed as LE's wouldn't fit in it.
 
Might need to be careful on this one, IIRC the leather/fabric holster for the driver as per the first pic was a US standard fit on early prod runs of the Jeep, but there was also the pressed steel clamp that was fixed to the rear of the folding windscreen, commonly held an M1 Garand however don't forget that kit supplied to the UK went through a strip down process of some sort - M3 & M4s would arrive (IIRC) with Thompsons or M3 SMGs as part of issue for crews & these as well as other US specific stuff was removed before issue. I remember reading this relating to the early issues of Shermans to the NA theatre & the blokes being livid at all sorts of happy kit being removed. I've not seen any pics of UK used Jeeps with the drivers holster fitted & iirc that the windscreen mounted clamp was also removed as LE's wouldn't fit in it.

Looking at the piccies of the Jeeps a couple of pages back in the thread, I cant see any evidence of rifle holsters. Ta for the tip re the window mount - not sure if the Meng Jeep has one fitted.
 

PFGEN

GCM
Are you sure you're not confusing them with Correspondents who were civilian press? The AFPU were soldiers with cameras who were part of the propaganda effort so were not non-combatants in the Geneva Convention sense, much the same as REME etc weren't intended to charge about killing the enemy.

From limited knowledge there was a distinction between civie journos and war correspondents and between the two sides. In the case of civil reporters at the start of ww2 a lot of US journal were in the likes of Berlin and positively encouraged to send out reports al be heavily censored. Not sure what happened to them when the Germans decided it would be a good idea to declare war on the US.

German war correspondents were members of their units and expected to fight as well as shoot film. No non-com role for them. The allied lot were different. Maybe somebody can come up with some photos that shows them armed. I have a mate who was a war correspondent embedded with US forces. I'll see if he knows anything on the historical aspects.
 

Smeggers

ADC
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Are you sure you're not confusing them with Correspondents who were civilian press? The AFPU were soldiers with cameras who were part of the propaganda effort so were not non-combatants in the Geneva Convention sense, much the same as REME etc weren't intended to charge about killing the enemy.
Definitely a point well made and in need of more research.

Had a look via Google and found the following:

R48cec2ca13f4a9bf50fab43886f953ee.jpeg
a3ce40ca1afeb994157244e4bafc0ba0.jpg
large_000000.jpg

Pistols seemed to be the order of the day for AFPU but not for War Correspondents (at least not the British) who as reported earlier, had to wear an arm band with the letter "C" clearly shown. There are pictures of various US correspondents with rifles, Thompsons and in one case a .30 cal machine gun! War Correspondents were civilians, whereas AFPU was a military unit.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
From limited knowledge there was a distinction between civie journos and war correspondents and between the two sides. In the case of civil reporters at the start of ww2 a lot of US journal were in the likes of Berlin and positively encouraged to send out reports al be heavily censored. Not sure what happened to them when the Germans decided it would be a good idea to declare war on the US.

German war correspondents were members of their units and expected to fight as well as shoot film. No non-com role for them. The allied lot were different. Maybe somebody can come up with some photos that shows them armed. I have a mate who was a war correspondent embedded with US forces. I'll see if he knows anything on the historical aspects.
...Bob Mitchum was unarmed in Anzio, until Columbo got shot....
 
Definitely a point well made and in need of more research.

Had a look via Google and found the following:

View attachment 567509View attachment 567508View attachment 567510
Pistols seemed to be the order of the day for AFPU but not for War Correspondents (at least not the British) who as reported earlier, had to wear an arm band with the letter "C" clearly shown. There are pictures of various US correspondents with rifles, Thompsons and in one case a .30 cal machine gun! War Correspondents were civilians, whereas AFPU was a military unit.
Interesting that the bloke on the left in photo 2 has his belt on back to front. Could this be a means of stabilising the camera, I wonder.
 
Interesting that the bloke on the left in photo 2 has his belt on back to front. Could this be a means of stabilising the camera, I wonder.

must be a reason or why would you do it?

You think about 58 pattern and what’s the benefit? I suppose you could get at your spare stash of fags in the kidney pouches and the water bottle was always a pain in the Arrse to get at but he’s got no belt kit in his belt, so like you say - why turn it around?
 
Definitely a point well made and in need of more research.

Had a look via Google and found the following:

View attachment 567509View attachment 567508View attachment 567510
Pistols seemed to be the order of the day for AFPU but not for War Correspondents (at least not the British) who as reported earlier, had to wear an arm band with the letter "C" clearly shown. There are pictures of various US correspondents with rifles, Thompsons and in one case a .30 cal machine gun! War Correspondents were civilians, whereas AFPU was a military unit.
And "armed" with the Zeiss Ikon Super Ikonta 312/16 (called Ikomat in the US). I also suspect that is a slightly later model, having an accessory shoe. In the middle photo (left) the camera is held in a brown leather Ever-Ready case. As I mentioned up thread, these cameras were standard commercial models imported via neutral Sweden during the war; very collectable and a tidy one is £200-400 each today and capable of taking excellent photos. The yellow filter is an accessory but would have been standard as well.
 
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Interesting that the bloke on the left in photo 2 has his belt on back to front. Could this be a means of stabilising the camera, I wonder.
I think that unlikely. The camera is handheld; typically using film speeds of 32-50 ISO/ASA, taking 11 shots per film. Not a point and shoot camera, but able to take superb photos handheld. (I have two!)
 
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I think that unlikely. The camera is handheld; typically using film speeds of 32-50 ISO/ASA, taking 8 shots per film. Not a point and shoot camera, but able to take good photos handheld. (I have two!)
I agree but was unable to come up with a better reason. I was thinking more in terms of cine cameras though, maybe with a yoke around the neck and straps linking the camera to the belt buckles.

Who knows? Might even have been a rig for a body camera.
 
I agree but was unable to come up with a better reason. I was thinking more in terms of cine cameras though, maybe with a yoke around the neck and straps linking the camera to the belt buckles.

Who knows? Might even have been a rig for a body camera.
Perhaps for a cine camera, but I've never seen any webbing rig but it's also something that could be extemporised
 

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