Show me your toolbox...

Wow. That looks just like my sitting room in Warcop. My place was originally a cumbrian farmhouse. Just like that with what would have been a range cooker. Also just like that a window off to the right. When we did the windows we removed an oak lintel which I still have. The house was built in the very early part of 17th century, so we think that the lump of oak would now be about 900 years old.

Farm houses of that era just had a single big room, I remember the layout well from my childhood. Sleeping was up on an open mezzanine. In our case that mezzanine formed the dining room ceiling, which when we did a bit of work was still daub over dried brushes.
My old man’s place in Devon was like that. The walls were thick at the base and got thinner as they went up with a thatch just resting on timbers, themselves just resting on the top of the wall, tied in with wooden pegs. It was all mud and straw apart from the bottom few feet. It was surprisingly hard. I can remember putting an extractor in and needed a hammer drill to get through the outer inch or two, inside was less packed but had some small stones in as a rudimentary concrete.

All the houses are about the same size or multiples thereof as over the years, 2 or 3 will have been knocked together. Apparently this is a function of landowners allowing the peasants to build houses with a footprint “the size a family can build in stone to the height of 2’ between sunrise and sunset on St Swithen’s Day”*. The whole community would pitch in in a loose interpretation of family, most were probably related anyway, and build in stone which is fairly rare thereabouts to the minimum required and then crack on with the much more readily available mud, straw and cow shit.

Terraces were popular as you’d only need to build 3 walls, the 4th being in place already.

* These are criteria I made up as I don’t know the real criteria but you get the idea.
 
Nah. It was delivered like that. Managed to blag a sizeable discount as a result.

Last big shouty match I had in there was while fitting some heavy duty sills to the Landy.

Involved drilling through hardened galvanised chassis, use of a Jack, large amounts of twatting my swede on metal etc.

There was a lot of swearing.
It’s cathartic.

Apparently.

i don’t know either, sounds like a good word though.
 
You need a project that you're never going to finish that has to be removed from your house at great expense after you die.

A small traction engine, a 14' plywood Mirror dinghy or a 1/2 scale Lancaster bomber made of lolly sticks will do.
Jethro Gibbs Walt
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
It’s cathartic.

Apparently.

i don’t know either, sounds like a good word though.
I also like to photosynthesise big words into sentences to sound clever.
 
Now I am in my mid-30's, I decided it's time to re-evaluate certain parts of my life. Starting with the important things, I've cropped my slightly receding hair to a grade 3 and now I come to the second-most important thing.

What DIY / tools should I possess? I'm looking for stuff that I will either probably need to use a fair amount, or stuff that will allow me to fix / do simple things without calling out a professional (eg the Basin Wrench saved me a lot of ££ on a plumber when changing my taps over).

I currently have (that I can remember):

An array of spanners
Set of Chisels
Many allen keys
20" Wood saw
Several junior hacksaws
12" Tenon saw
18v Cordless drill
Many screwdrivers
Leatherman
Needle-nose / normal pliers
The phone number of several actual professionals
Couple of claw hammers
Soldering Iron
Belt Sander (on order)
Basin Wrench
Heat gun

So over to you - what more do I need / would you have for easy jobs / general maintenance?
Blimey, this COVID virus makes people create some shit threads.

..........and anyway, I’m not showing you my toolbox, bumda.
 

Mrsheeny

War Hero
Now I am in my mid-30's, I decided it's time to re-evaluate certain parts of my life. Starting with the important things, I've cropped my slightly receding hair to a grade 3 and now I come to the second-most important thing.

What DIY / tools should I possess? I'm looking for stuff that I will either probably need to use a fair amount, or stuff that will allow me to fix / do simple things without calling out a professional (eg the Basin Wrench saved me a lot of ££ on a plumber when changing my taps over).

I currently have (that I can remember):

An array of spanners
Set of Chisels
Many allen keys
20" Wood saw
Several junior hacksaws
12" Tenon saw
18v Cordless drill
Many screwdrivers
Leatherman
Needle-nose / normal pliers
The phone number of several actual professionals
Couple of claw hammers
Soldering Iron
Belt Sander (on order)
Basin Wrench
Heat gun

So over to you - what more do I need / would you have for easy jobs / general maintenance?
Just off that, you need the follwing;

Bahco 8" Wide Grip Adjustable Spanner
Rothenberger Waterpump Pliers
Screwdriver set - Wera will do
Bahco hacksaw

End of the day yoi get what you pay for, buy cheap, pay twice.

Get a decent tool box aswell. I've had/tried/broke every type and size of tool box/bag going and the one I swear by is the open tote by Stanley, usually about £20. Other than that a Stanley Fax Max tool box, either are just as good and you can use the box as a hop up.
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
I have a garage full of nice shiny tools , but you can be assured that when doing ANY diy i have to go and buy the one tool i dont have ! years ago when I moved into this house i went through a phase of always buying a tool in Aldi or the market . The only problem with this is that I now have at least six tool boxes all labeled Screw, glue, saw, plane car etc etc but I dont have a scoobie how to use them ! It might be coz i'm left handed but I just always ferk up diy jobs and just create m ore work for tradesmen . I've always been the same.

However what ever your do it yourself project is and I mean ANY project give me time and I 'll write you a booklet on how to do it complete with illustrations .
 

morsk

LE
I worked for a Norwegian Company for nearly 20 years and saw / used that or similar type of stove for cooking very effectively ... can sometimes be a little dirty when using wood with a lot of resin in it .

... and slightly off thread I actually have one of these which works on a similar principle and will burn virtually anything ... with my limited DIY skills I made a lid for the mug .

Swiss Volcano Stove.jpg
 
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HE117

LE
Japanese pull saw..

get a "Ryoba" which has a cross cut on one side and a rip on the other..

You will never go back!
 

WALT

War Hero
Ok, here's a bit of tool porn. It's a Messerschmitt panel beater's tool kit (or at least most of one).
I found a bloke who had three at a fleamarket in Leipzig. The first was, as I expected, robbed of tools and stripped out.
"How much for the tool boxes?"
"80 Euros apiece."

Hmm, bit steep for an empty box, no matter how nice. Had a quick look at the next; also empty. Then onto the third. "Hello." Half the tools were still inside and all the partitions. And what got my little heart pittering and apattering, was that it also had the inventory book inside so one could know exactly what should be in it.
"How much for this one?"
"80 Euros apiece."
"Ok, ta very much, this one's coming home with me."
Now, every time I go to a fleamarket, I take a list of what's missing. Slowly, it's filling up again.

DSCN4719.jpg
DSCN4720.jpg
DSCN4721.jpg
DSCN4722.jpg
 
Ok, here's a bit of tool porn. It's a Messerschmitt panel beater's tool kit (or at least most of one).
I found a bloke who had three at a fleamarket in Leipzig. The first was, as I expected, robbed of tools and stripped out.
"How much for the tool boxes?"
"80 Euros apiece."

Hmm, bit steep for an empty box, no matter how nice. Had a quick look at the next; also empty. Then onto the third. "Hello." Half the tools were still inside and all the partitions. And what got my little heart pittering and apattering, was that it also had the inventory book inside so one could know exactly what should be in it.
"How much for this one?"
"80 Euros apiece."
"Ok, ta very much, this one's coming home with me."
Now, every time I go to a fleamarket, I take a list of what's missing. Slowly, it's filling up again.

View attachment 495071View attachment 495072View attachment 495073View attachment 495074
The wood is in remarkably good condition?
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Since we’re now talking tool porn, this is the kit from my Ferrari. (Well a picture of an identical one I found on the Internet because I can’t be arsed to go out to the garage.)

Every piece has the Ferrari prancing horse on it.
1FB327CB-C428-4AA6-B628-7D052690AD61.jpeg
 

theinventor

Old-Salt
Safety glasses. You don’t really need them until you get a splinter in your eye....
+1 to that, and you can get them pretty cheap online with corrective lenses so that you can actually see. I got some +1.5 (same as my readers) and it's a revelation: I can properly see what I'm doing, so less chance of injury, and being safely goggles they stay on my face whatever angle my head's at. I've trashed two pairs of "best" readers from angle grinder sparks on the glass, these I just chuck and buy another pair.
 

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