Show me your toolbox...

Rab_C

War Hero
And this is my tool box.

Owners of Snap On trolleys will laugh at the quality, but the whole set up was under a grand and is more than adequate for my needs.

It currently looks nothing like this and is covered in bits of half finished projects and surrounded by paint tins.
View attachment 494671
Ravers you stole that design from pusser, the materials are slightly different but the design could be from any pussers war canoe.
 
One of the very few electric gadgets I have that can manage ash timber. I grudgingly acknowledge that they are quite handy.
I'll freely admit that I am terrible at carpentry, which is why I became a brickie, but even I can make lovely straight and square cuts with one of those gadgets.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Very interesting thing, joists, in this part ofthe world.

A huge number are actually second hand bits of ships.

Once upon a time all timber cut was owed to the navy. The only time anything decent was available for building was when ships went in for refit.

The beams in one of my barns in warcop were dated 1838 and had all sorts of slots and witness marks that had nowt to do with barns.
I’ve got this beast in one of our downstairs rooms. I reckon it’s about 7m long and about a foot thick.

Can’t remember what he said it’s made of but a mate with a big timber / forestry business, was here a few years back and remarked that it definitely wasn’t a native species of wood.

The ship theory would make sense.

114D9CFA-7C5D-46E8-822A-0ECA29E56827.jpeg
 

Polyester

Old-Salt
Very interesting thing, joists, in this part ofthe world.

A huge number are actually second hand bits of ships.

Once upon a time all timber cut was owed to the navy. The only time anything decent was available for building was when ships went in for refit.

The beams in one of my barns in warcop were dated 1838 and had all sorts of slots and witness marks that had nowt to do with barns.
I am massively into carpentry and joinery, just obsessed with it. I love reading old buildings and you‘re bang on about building materials and provenance. It’s actually astonishing how the trades and materials where organised once upon a time.
 
I particularly like the word ”F***” on that Joist. That’s class.
When I use the expletive, “you f**king c**t often shouted at an unco-operative inanimate piece of wood or metal, my missus often asks me if doing that fixed it.

I politely tell her that yes it did and everything is right with the world again.

After 38 years of being married, I’ve never stopped using the phrase but I do now mostly say it either out of her earshot or if that’s not possible very quietly in a fierce whisper.

Sadly, my workshop is a bit of a no go area for bad language.

The neighbours in the adjoining property at the bottom of our garden have children and any talking whatsoever is carried out in the knowledge that if their children are in their garden, they can probably hear everything being spoken through the thin wood wooden fencing that borders our property and the thin walls of the workshop.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
When I use the expletive, “you f**king c**t often shouted at an unco-operative inanimate piece of wood or metal, my missus often asks me if doing that fixed it.

I politely tell her that yes it did and everything is right with the world again.

After 38 years of being married, I’ve never stopped using the phrase but I do now mostly say it either out of her earshot or if that’s not possible very quietly in a fierce whisper.

Sadly, my workshop is a bit of a no go area for bad language.

The neighbours in the adjoining property at the bottom of our garden have children and any talking whatsoever is carried out in the knowledge that if their children are in their garden, they can probably hear everything being spoken through the thin wood wooden fencing that borders our property and the thin walls of the workshop.
A few years back I was driving around town, generally being sweary at old cnuts towing caravans around and getting in the way.

I hadn’t even noticed to be honest, such is the severity of my service induced Tourette’s.

One of the sprogs pipes up for the back:

“Daddy what’s a fogwood?”

She’d misheard me say fuckwit.

Of course I corrected her and then told her never to say any of the words that daddy says while he’s driving.

Fogwood is now our generic swear word for when the kids are within earshot.
 

Truxx

LE
I’ve got this beast in one of our downstairs rooms. I reckon it’s about 7m long and about a foot thick.

Can’t remember what he said it’s made of but a mate with a big timber / forestry business, was here a few years back and remarked that it definitely wasn’t a native species of wood.

The ship theory would make sense.

View attachment 494682
Wow. That looks just like my sitting room in Warcop. My place was originally a cumbrian farmhouse. Just like that with what would have been a range cooker. Also just like that a window off to the right. When we did the windows we removed an oak lintel which I still have. The house was built in the very early part of 17th century, so we think that the lump of oak would now be about 900 years old.

Farm houses of that era just had a single big room, I remember the layout well from my childhood. Sleeping was up on an open mezzanine. In our case that mezzanine formed the dining room ceiling, which when we did a bit of work was still daub over dried brushes.
 
A few years back I was driving around town, generally being sweary at old cnuts towing caravans around and getting in the way.

I hadn’t even noticed to be honest, such is the severity of my service induced Tourette’s.

One of the sprogs pipes up for the back:

“Daddy what’s a fogwood?”

She’d misheard me say fuckwit.

Of course I corrected her and then told her never to say any of the words that daddy says while he’s driving.

Fogwood is now our generic swear word for when the kids are within earshot.
Another problem is that we have the grandchildren most weeks for usually a couple of days which is marvellous but I have tinnitus from my days in the mob.

I often talk in what I believe to be an almost whisper like tone, for example on the phone to my brother or to mates and we exchange the normal bloke language with a swear word in every other sentence and my missus will shout over on almost every occasion, we can all hear you!
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Now I am in my mid-30's, I decided it's time to re-evaluate certain parts of my life. Starting with the important things, I've cropped my slightly receding hair to a grade 3 and now I come to the second-most important thing.

What DIY / tools should I possess? I'm looking for stuff that I will either probably need to use a fair amount, or stuff that will allow me to fix / do simple things without calling out a professional (eg the Basin Wrench saved me a lot of ££ on a plumber when changing my taps over).

I currently have (that I can remember):

An array of spanners
Set of Chisels
Many allen keys
20" Wood saw
Several junior hacksaws
12" Tenon saw
18v Cordless drill
Many screwdrivers
Leatherman
Needle-nose / normal pliers
The phone number of several actual professionals
Couple of claw hammers
Soldering Iron
Belt Sander (on order)
Basin Wrench
Heat gun

So over to you - what more do I need / would you have for easy jobs / general maintenance?
I would definitely add

Jigsaw
Circular Saw or Track Saw
Clamps
Decent adjustable square, get two a 12" and 6"
Punches
Nail Pullers
Spirit or laser level

And go for a Random orbital sander rather than a belt sander
And a decent pair of hand planes, No4 and a low angle block plane
 

Polyester

Old-Salt
I would definitely add

Jigsaw
Circular Saw or Track Saw
Clamps
Decent adjustable square, get two a 12" and 6"
Punches
Nail Pullers
Spirit or laser level

And go for a Random orbital sander rather than a belt sander
And a decent pair of hand planes, No4 and a low angle block plane
I’m getting a whiff of Clifton, Marples and classic hand tools from you Rampant! :)
 
Wow. That looks just like my sitting room in Warcop. My place was originally a cumbrian farmhouse. Just like that with what would have been a range cooker. Also just like that a window off to the right. When we did the windows we removed an oak lintel which I still have. The house was built in the very early part of 17th century, so we think that the lump of oak would now be about 900 years old.

Farm houses of that era just had a single big room, I remember the layout well from my childhood. Sleeping was up on an open mezzanine. In our case that mezzanine formed the dining room ceiling, which when we did a bit of work was still daub over dried brushes.
The ship bit is spot on.
in the early 1970’s we needed to double the size of the bar at our caravan site at Troutbeck. Dad had the idea of putting in a Mezzanine but it had to match the old barn we originally started with.
He went to Daltons auction yard ( on london rd Carlisle for those who remember) and came back with about 30 tonnes of oak.
It had all originally come out of ships, been recycled into barn and house roof trusses, and then recycled into the sale yard.
on first glance it all looked utterly fvcked, eatern with worm, odd joint sockets everywhere, tennon joint ends with wooden pins in that made no sense . We thought he’d bought crap firewood.
However, start to clean it up with an adze and axe, another story.You needed no skill as when the blade cut through the outer inch of wormy crap, you would think you had hit iron.The inner timbers were utterly sound ( cut down in the late c18 I’d guess.) and with the aid of a very very sharp chainsaw we built a very convincing second deck to the club in about 3 days.
we sold the site in the 80’s and I’ve never been back but I would hope it’s still there.
 

giatttt

Old-Salt
Better to have a drawer full of ancient high quality mismatched imperial spanners, than a brand new shiny set of Halfords shit made of butter steel.
The Halfords Professional stuff is OK and they have a no quibble replacement service just like SnapOn/BluePoint
 

Oops

War Hero
Oh heck, @ Truxx can you make anyone feel even more guilty....

We're currently in the process of re roofing original house (1650's) with added barn (1791) it's got two main purlins that supported a stone flagged roof, which started to 'slip' when I were a lad....
Council made em remove the flags, and due to family circumstances, inheritance tax, etc. Its been left (abandoned) ever since....

Im in the process of clearing up to chuck a steel portal over it, and as a result the ( now half rotten) pulins have to come down.....
They're over 45ft.long. and past reclamation, when admitting the feeling of regret to the kids whilst firing up the chainsaw, they mocked my 'Sad Old Gittedness'
It was only when I explained that when these were saplings Henry Vlll was probably a lad, did it start to dawn!
 

Attachments

For maintenance, I would add:

Sharpening stone (or go full on with a wet grinder) - dull blades are dangerous, if it’s not cutting correctly, the tendency is to apply more force until it either slips or fubars the job.
A rubber mallet - sometimes you want to apply a bit of force without destroying the thing being forced.
A vice - holding a workpiece securely is common sense.
A shop vac. Many uses, and stops ‘er indoors pitching a fit when you get drywall dust in the household vac.
A decent pair of snips. Bit of practice and they’re wire strippers too.
A multimeter. A cheap Chinese thing for a tenner will do. Is it live? Yup. Thank God I tested it first...
A set of files, both round and flat.
A step ladder. Self explanatory, but standing on chairs is not for winners.
Safety glasses. You don’t really need them until you get a splinter in your eye....
Gloves. Decent leather work gloves. But do not use anywhere near spinning blades. They will get caught in the blade and drag your fingers in.
An apron. Spend a tenner on an apron or get paint/glue/oil on a more expensive shirt. If it bothers someone that it’s not masculine, then I would question their masculinity to begin with :)
A set of brushes. Steel wire to derust things, brass wire to remove corrosion from soft metals, stiff nylon where scratching can’t be tolerated.
Selection of sandpaper in various grits, say 40 through 400.
A small tap hammer. You don’t always want to beat the shit out of something.
A socket set. Buy the best you can afford, it will last. I bought mine when I was 18 and I’m 52 soon.
If you get any tools with spinning blades, get a set of push sticks. Use them, not your fingers.
A decent Stanley knife and blades. Change them when they get dull.

If the scope includes actually making things, as well as fixing/maintaining them, would include a table saw and a compound miter saw as a minimum. Don’t buy a thickness planer unless you’re also buying a planer/jointer too. They work together. One is not much use without the other. You can’t make wood straight with a thickness planer, and you can’t change the thickness of a piece with a jointer.

You can go mad on lathes, routers, bits, sanders, bandsaws etc, but that’s beyond the scope here. DOn’t need any of that stuff for maintenance or making flat pieces.

If you see any electrically operated tools with laser alignment guides, walk away. They WILL go out of adjustment, and you WILL cut the piece wrongly. It’s just a matter of time until they go out of alignment. Where the blade hits the piece is where it will cut. It’s no more complicated than that.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Now I am in my mid-30's, I decided it's time to re-evaluate certain parts of my life. Starting with the important things, I've cropped my slightly receding hair to a grade 3 and now I come to the second-most important thing.

What DIY / tools should I possess? I'm looking for stuff that I will either probably need to use a fair amount, or stuff that will allow me to fix / do simple things without calling out a professional (eg the Basin Wrench saved me a lot of ££ on a plumber when changing my taps over).

I currently have (that I can remember):

An array of spanners
Set of Chisels
Many allen keys
20" Wood saw
Several junior hacksaws
12" Tenon saw
18v Cordless drill
Many screwdrivers
Leatherman
Needle-nose / normal pliers
The phone number of several actual professionals
Couple of claw hammers
Soldering Iron
Belt Sander (on order)
Basin Wrench
Heat gun

So over to you - what more do I need / would you have for easy jobs / general maintenance?
Mole grips , circuit test screwdriver/multi meter,heat gun
 

Guns

ADC
Moderator
Book Reviewer
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Top is a bit untidy as I am going through my fishing stuff. Peg boards are great for having tools where you need them. Less used power tools are in cupboards to the side.

I would recommend buying as best as you can afford for key item like cordless and impact drill, circular saw and those go to hand tools like screwdrivers and wrenches. I made the bench myself and so it is the right height and width for me - ease to do and you can use under the bench for storage - I have my socket sets, table top saw and other bigger items. If space is tight consider making the bench top fold down. If you are serious about doing stuff then a mite saw (to the right folded up) is a must. Makes cutting lumber less hassle.

If you are going cordless and it is for occasional use and general DIY choose a brand and stick with it. Saves on batteries. You can get deals on a starter kit. I went with Milwaukee as they had a good deal on charger and batteries. Only snag is I'm in for that brand and they are pricey.
 

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