Should the TA have the option of a army pension?

Discussion in 'Armed Forces Pension Scheme' started by Man_of_Kent, Sep 13, 2007.

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  1. I think the Ta should have some sort of pension, as the saying goes one army TA and Regular. Not to sure how it could work, but it would be a good idea.
     
  2. Would you give up your bounty first?

    There you go boys....cat...pidgeons..go!
     
  3. Could be a option, either bounty or pension, but not both
     
  4. The forces are under-funded as it is so realistically it would only be possible for the TA to receive a bounty or a pension, not both.
    A TA pension wouldn’t really amount to much as we work on a part-time basis and realistically how many reservists are actually going to stay in long enough to actually earn said pension…
    We’re far better off sticking with our bounty.
     
  5. Check this out:

    http://www.mod.uk/DefenceInternet/AboutDefence/CorporatePublications/PersonnelPublications/Pensions/Reserves/Jsp764Part3ReserveForcesPensionScheme.htm

    0201. A person is eligible to be an active member of the scheme if:

    (a) he is serving in a Full Time Reserve Service (including Additional Duties Commitments) appointment or is mobilised under Part 4, 5 or 6 of the Reserve Forces Act 1996, or a corresponding power in the Reserve Forces Act 1980,

    (b) either:
    (1) his service began on or after 6 April 2005, or
    (2) he opted to transfer to RFPS from AFPS 75 on the common
    transfer date of 6 April 2006, and

    (c) he is not:
    (1) an active member of AFPS 75, or
    (2) a member of another occupational pension scheme (ie a scheme
    in respect of which an employer is paying a contribution).

    It is a bit of a read, and no I haven't, but it may answer your query.
     
  6. If you give all the TA a pension then you are rewarding people by providing the potential for a miniscule pension for little more than turning up for a drill night and, due to the lack of MTDs, the odd weekend and a 15 day camp. We already reward this committment by the bounty system.
    Are you proposing scrapping the bounty as it isn't enough, isn't wanted or needed or that it should be replaced by a system that rewards an individuals committment at age 60/65 by a small amount? Bearing in mind that would imply turning up for at least the minimum days for a full length TA career before you get anything other than your DRP?
    I was under the impression that the bounty was a retention bonus. Scrap that bonus and replace it with a pension at 60/65 and you may find that not a lot of people stay around long enough to collect.
    In my opinion the FTRS pension scheme provides the reward that TA soldiers should expect because it is targeted at those who are willing and able to support the regs on Ops or by supporting them on limited forms of FTRS.
     
  7. pay your bounties into a private pension scheme and there we have it - a pension for your military efforts!


    (unless it all goes tits up that is)
     
  8. Off we go again. :sleepy:

    Invest your bounty in a personal pension scheme if you think you'll live that long.


    edited to add: others got there first.
     
  9. OldSnowy

    OldSnowy LE Moderator Book Reviewer

    Having been on ARRSE for far too long, I refer m'learend friends back to this thread from 2004:

    http://www.arrse.co.uk/cpgn2/Forums/viewtopic/t=10922/postdays=0/postorder=asc/start=0.html

    Which was when, according to The Times:

    "A GROUP of 30 Territorial Army recruits is bringing a discrimination test case against the Ministry of Defence to win pension rights for all 40,000 part-time soldiers. The reservists will argue before an employment tribunal in London today that the Army has denied them access to the Army Pension Fund. Despite serving up to 126 days a year, including service in the Gulf War, and believing that part of their pay was going into the Army Pension Fund, they have been told that they will have no army pension rights on retirement. Michael Morse, partner at Fox Hayes, the Leeds law firm leading the case for the soldiers, said: "Men and women in the TA believe that they are an integral part of the modern British Army and they make a huge commitment. Their job titles and roles are no different from regular service personnel and many became senior officers with regulars serving under them. Now it seems the MoD is telling them that they are only playing weekend warrior after all." He said that the MoD denied that the recruits were protected by part-time legislation, although the Army's website often called them part-time."

    The group's claims, made under the Equal Pay Act, argue that denial of access to a pension has a disparate impact on women, who are represented in higher numbers in the TA than in the regular Army. The MoD, which is resisting the claim, has been said to refute any comparison between the work done by the TA and regulars."


    It is now September 2007, and the Employment Tribunal reached a conclusion last month. They agreed with the MOD case, that most pension benefits provided to Volunteer Reservists would be insignificant and disproportionate compared to the administrative costs of providing them and also it was more appropriate to remunerate Volunteer Reserve Service by way of a bounty.

    In other words, no pension.

    Back to the original question - should the TA have the option of an Army pension - well, possibly.

    Will the TA ever have the option of belonging to the same pension scheme as the Regulars? In the words of buffy, "Nope, never gonna happen, trust me."
     
  10. Well its going to be a pretty token sum for most isnt it probably cost more to admin than pay out .I'd rather any money went to people who get broken in training or on ops .
     
  11. Yawn. We've been through this before.

    a) there's no money

    b) there's no 'will' to do it by the MOD

    c) the bounty will go and I'd rather keep it

    d) on a part time basis, it'll be worth diddly squat anyway and fewer and fewer TA are lasting more than 10 years.

    e) if you had a pension, they'd want you to sign a contract to stay and I'd rather have the freedom to hand my kit in whenever I wanted.
     
  12. msr

    msr LE

  13. How about a super bounty one off payment, say 5k, for those on completion of 22 years and beng certified efficient for X years of that
     
  14. msr

    msr LE

    Because there are no retention issues with people who have been in that long?
     
  15. Thats right, however this was an instead of pension suggestion, not a retention bonus (however i could see it being taken as such as if it wre only paid out at a certain length service)